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Michelle Tea


"It's so hard to get rid of dudes when they attach themselves hostilely to you. At least they were in a car and we could run in the opposite direction if we needed to. But that's so humiliating. Running away sucks."


Michelle Tea reads a selection from Rose of No Man's Land, her whirlwind exploration of poverty and dropouts. In this excerpt Trisha and Rose are attempting to hitch a ride and are forced to improvise a surprisingly effective weapon to fend off a car full of boys. (Running Time: 9:08)


Michelle Tea reads a passage from her brand new as-yet-unpublished novel, Black Wave, about the end of the world and the end of love in '90s San Francisco. (Running Time: 23:09)

Michelle Tea is the author of four memoirs, including the Lambda-award winning Valencia and the illustrated Rent Girl, which is currently being developed for television. She continues to curate literary events nationally, and is host and cookie-baker for the monthly Radar Reading Series at the San Francisco Public Library. Rose of No Man's Land is her first novel.


Related Broadcasts

  • Black Wave
    • Rose of No Man's Land

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