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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Sunday, November 19, 2017

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Sunday, November 19, 2017
  • 12:00 am
    Radiolab Donation and Mutation Where do you find comfort after the death of a child? In this episode, Radiolab follows one couple as they discover a sense of purpose in an unlikely place: a clinical world where human parts are used for research. In this surprising journey, Ross and Sarah Gray gain a view of science that is redemptive, fussy facts that are tender, and parts of a loved one that add up to something unexpected. Then, get a glimpse at a technology on the cusp of radically changing how we think about the effect of scientific advancements on humanity. Hidden inside some of the worlds smallest organisms is one of the most powerful tools scientists have ever stumbled across. It's a defense system that has existed in bacteria for millions of years and it may some day let us change the course of human evolution.
  • 1:00 am
    Freakonomics Radio Why Doesnt Everyone Get the Flu Vaccine? Host Stephen Dubner looks for a small step people can take to stop playing a part in killing babies, the sick, and the elderly. Turns out, it already exists, and its called the flu shot.
  • 2:00 am
    To the Best of Our Knowledge Working For A Weekend That Never Seems To Come Weekends arent recharging you much anymore? Youve got a lot of company. Across professions, half of Americans surveyed say theyre exhausted from work. More and more of us feel scrambled, tired and drained. Are we facing daily lives more prone to burnout? And what can we do about it?
  • 3:00 am
    To the Best of Our Knowledge Getting Jazzed There's a new kind of music packing nightclubs with young fans. It's jazz - but not the sound of your grandparents' supper club. Infused with hip hop and other popular musical forms, jazz is being remade. We talk with some of today's biggest and most innovative jazz stars, including Esperanza Spalding and Vijay Iyer, and explore the magic of improvisation.
  • 4:00 am
    Living On Earth The Rights of Nature Host Steve Curwoods discussion with University of British Columbia Environmental Law professor David Boyd continues, as he explains how indigenous peoples have helped spearhead the movement to ensure that the rights of natural features and ecosystems are protected. David Boyds book, The Rights of Nature, argues that its time this enhancement of rights was widely recognized, to protect the future of the planet.
  • 5:00 am
    Weekend Edition PTSD When does stress turn to trauma? For a former social worker it happened after a career dealing with child abuse.
  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
  • 10:00 am
  • 11:00 am
    A Prairie Home Companion Jason Isbell, Angelique Kidjo, The Dover Quartet, and Billy Collins This week its the second of three November rebroadcasts, from just over a year ago at The Academy of Music in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Jason Isbell sings "Speed Trap Town" and "Cover Me Up," Anglique Kidjo performs "Afirika" and "Orisha," The Dover Quartet plays the Adagio for Strings by Pennsylvania's own Samuel Barber, and Billy Collins shares "On Rhyme" and "Thanksgiving" from his collection The Rain in Portugal. Plus: Chris Thile's Song of the Week, "I Made This for You"; check in with the Philly Chapter of We're Not Actually Doing Construction, Just Making Loud Noises Early in the Morning; a glimpse into the world of fine dining; and Lydia Rogers of The Secret Sisters joins Chris on Leonard Cohen's "Dance Me to the End of Love."
  • AFTERNOON
  • 1:00 pm
    City Arts & Lectures Jennifer Egan Jennifer Egan is the author of several novels and a short story collection. Her novel A Visit From the Goon Squad, won the 2011 Pulitzer Prize, the National Book Critics Circle Award, and the Los Angeles Times book prize. Also a journalist, she has written frequently in the New York Times Magazine. Manhattan Beach, Egans first historical novel, will be published in October 2017. Mesmerizing, hauntingly beautiful, with the pace and atmosphere of a noir thriller and a wealth of detail about organized crime, the merchant marine and the clash of classes in New York, it is a deft, startling, intimate exploration of a transformative moment in the lives of women and men, America and the world.
  • 2:00 pm
    On the Media When Bad People Make Good Art One way the allegations made against Harvey Weinstein differed from those against stars like Louis C.K., is that Weinstein was important to the film industry, whereas C.K. was important to us. And the many fans who related to his comedy and filmmaking now find themselves burdened with the question: knowing what they now know, can they continue to love his work? Kathryn VanArendonk, film and television critic for New York Magazine, isn't so sure. She and Brooke discuss why trust was essential to enjoying C.K.'s work and how the legacy of his work has been altered.
  • 3:00 pm
    TED Radio Hour Simple Solutions Sometimes, the best solutions to complex problems are simple. But simple doesn't always mean easy. This hour, TED speakers describe the innovation and hard work that goes into achieving simplicity.
  • 4:00 pm
  • 5:00 pm
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    Latino USA Disney in Latin Ameria With the release of Coco, Disney Pixar's film about the Day of the Dead, Latino USA takes a look back at Disneys relationship with Latin America. We start in the 1940s when Walt Disney and a group of animators were deployed by the U.S. government to Latin America in efforts to curb Nazi influence there. Then we hear from a Chilean writer who wrote a book called "How to Read Donald Duck" critiquing Disney comics American imperialism in the 1070s. His book would later be burned in Chile. And finally, we talk with the directors of Coco, Lee Unkrich and Adrian Molina.
  • 7:00 pm
    Radio Specials Planet Money: North Korea's Capitalists Even inside North Korea, the most restrictive, socialist regime in the world, there are entrepreneurs. People are dreaming up ideas of services to offer, products to sell, businesses to start. They're called the 'donju,' and they're part of North Korea's small middle class. When a member of the donju starts a business, the government gets a cut of the profits. Lots of that money has helped fund North Korea's nuclear program. Today on the show, we go inside the 'Hermit Kingdom' and meet North Korea's capitalists and the westerners training them to be better business-people.
  • 7:30 pm
    Radio Specials How I Built This with Guy Raz: Gary Erickson - Founder of Clif Bar Guy Raz talks to Gary Erickson, who created the Clif Bar. He got the idea after asking his mom "Can you make a cookie without butter, sugar or oil?" The result was Clif Bar, an energy bar named after his dad now one of the most popular energy bars in the U.S.
  • 8:00 pm
    Marketplace Weekend Identity Thieves, Pay to Read, Sustainable Thanksgiving Getting ready for the holidays can mean swiping that credit card A LOT. What can happen when ID thieves get your information, and how can you avoid that? Plus, is it a students constitutional right to learn how to read? Are states obligated to pay for that in public education? And healthy and sustainable eating isnt impossible this Thanksgiving. Why scaling down your Thanksgiving turkey could save the world.
  • 9:00 pm
    KQED Newsroom GOP Tax Plan, the Week in Politics, Vietnam Town Hall Check in with Silicon Valley Congressman Ro Khanna to get his reaction to the new GOP tax plan which would cut about $1.5 trillion over the next ten years, plus includes a clause to repeal the healthcare mandate under Obamacare. Then the show is joined by our political experts to analyze the biggest news of the week from sexual harassment allegations against embattled senate candidate Roy Moore to President Trumps Asia trip. And KQED's Thuy Vu hosted a town hall about the Vietnam War aboard the U.S.S. Hornet in Alameda. The event featured panel discussions about PTSD and the anti-war movement as well as the war's lingering impact on those who fought in the war.
  • 9:30 pm
    Cambridge Forum Deadly Double Helix: Part 2 The public conversation with Danielle Allen, Director of the Safra Center for Ethics at Harvard continues as she discusses her new memoir CUZ which documents the events which conspired to cause the untimely death of her young cousin, Michael, on the streets of Los Angeles in 2009. A deadly double helix of narcotics and street gangs ultimately entrapped her cousin, as with countless others, leading to his incarceration and death.
  • 10:00 pm
    Truth, Politics, and Power with Neal Conan Saudi Arabia and the United States Donald Trump made his first visit as President to Saudi Arabia and embraced King Salman and his son. Now the Crown Prince, the 31 year old Mohammed Bin Salman, arrested hundreds of prominent Saudis in whats been described as a purge. Hes also responsible for Saudi Arabias aggressive proxy wars with Iran and its unstated alliance with Israel.
  • 11:00 pm
    Tech Nation Codebreaking Moira speaks with journalist Jason Fagone about Elizebeth Smith Friedman, a pioneer in codebreaking, from World War I to rumrunners to drug smuggling to the famous Enigma machine. His book is The Woman Who Smashed Codes: A True Story of Love, Spies, and the Unlikely Heroine Who Outwitted Americas Enemies. Then on Tech Nation Health, Dr. Marco Taglietti, President and CEO of Scynexis, talks about their work in serious invasive fungal infections.
  • 12:00 am
    On the Media When Bad People Make Good Art One way the allegations made against Harvey Weinstein differed from those against stars like Louis C.K., is that Weinstein was important to the film industry, whereas C.K. was important to us. And the many fans who related to his comedy and filmmaking now find themselves burdened with the question: knowing what they now know, can they continue to love his work? Kathryn VanArendonk, film and television critic for New York Magazine, isn't so sure. She and Brooke discuss why trust was essential to enjoying C.K.'s work and how the legacy of his work has been altered.
Sunday, November 19, 2017

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Radio Technical Issues

Radio Technical Issues

As we become aware of technical problems originating from KQED Radio, we will list them here.

 

    Radio
    • KQEI Off The Air 11/4/2017

      The KQEI transmitter will be turned off Saturday morning (11/4). Utility work in the area requires de-energizing the lines for the safety of the workers. It is expected to be off for 5 hours.  Once the power returns, the broadcast will return to normal.

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our Radio Technical Issues page.

 

Radio Specials

Every week, KQED airs some of the best programs from independent radio producers and public radio networks around the world.