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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Monday, May 25, 2015

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Monday, May 25, 2015
  • 12:00 am
    On the Media Who Remembers the Philadelphia MOVE Bombing? On May 13, 1985, the Philadelphia police bombed a fortified home occupied by MOVE, a radical organization. The bombing and the fire that followed destroyed much of a city block and have haunted the neighborhood. When native Philadelphian and NPR correspondent Gene Demby reported on the 30th anniversary of the bombing, though, he got a reaction he wasn't expecting: much of his audience hadn't heard of it before.
  • 1:00 am
    Latino USA A Latino History of the U.S. Take a trip around the country with host Maria Hinojosa to learn about Latino history. Hear about the patriotic celebrations of Laredo, Texas and the first colony in the US. It's not where you think it is. Also: could Zorro be the first American superhero? A high school class in East LA learns about the Chicano movement. And just where did the term "Hispanic" come from?
  • 2:00 am
    Marketplace Weekend The Exclusivity of Credit Did you know credit scores were designed to money more accessible? So what happened?
  • 3:00 am
    Morning Edition Remembering Local Heroes on Memorial Day Boston is full of statues of statesmen and generals. But there are smaller memorials as well, to people who aren't in history books. Like the plaques on street corners, commemorating neighbors who were killed in war.
  • 5:00 am
    Morning Edition
    The California Report 5:50am, 6:50am & 8:50am

    KQED News 6am, 6:30am, 7am, 7:30am, 8am, 8:30am, 9am, 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm & 4:30pm


    Perspectives 6:06am, 7:35am & 11:30pm

  • MORNING
  • 9:00 am
    Forum War Photographer Lynsey Addario Lynsey Addario is no stranger to war. The MacArthur Award-winning photographer has covered conflicts in Afghanistan, Iraq and Syria, embedding herself with soldiers and capturing rare pictures of warlords and civilians caught in the crossfire. She has also survived two kidnappings and a horrific car accident overseas. In her new memoir, "It's What I Do: A Photographer's Life of Love and War," she takes a candid look at her nomadic life and her struggle to find love and motherhood while pursuing a dangerous career.
  • 9:30 am
    Forum Veterans Use Tattoos to Share Their War Stories War veteran Ron "Doc" Riviera says, "Every tattoo on my body tells a story. If people would just ask, they wouldn't get a movie or a book, they'd get the real thing." Riviera is part of an online exhibit called "War Ink," which uses the stories behind veterans' body art to bridge the often difficult gap between the civilian and military worlds. On this Memorial Day, we'll hear from three soldiers who participated in the project.
  • 10:00 am
    Forum How to Get Kids Away From Screens and Into Nature Paleontologist and "Dinosaur Train" host Scott Sampson says that the average American child spends about four to seven minutes a day outside. In his new book "How to Raise a Wild Child," Sampson calls on parents to become "nature mentors" and help their kids connect to the outdoors. We'll talk with Sampson about how to raise kids who love nature at a time when gratification is only a click away.
  • 10:30 am
    Forum How a Goshawk Helped a Daughter Grieve British author, poet and naturalist Helen Macdonald's new book is a memoir about her father's unexpected and sudden death. It's also a detailed look at how she learned to overcome her grief by training a goshawk, a bird with a reputation as "murderous, difficult to tame, sulky, fractious and foreign." Macdonald joins us to talk about her acclaimed book, "H is for Hawk."
  • 11:00 am
    Here & Now Lobster Rolling in Maine Ask 100 chefs how to make a lobster roll and you'll get 100 different answers.
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    The Takeaway How the Obama Administration is Battling ISIS The show gets a look at what is happening behind the scenes in the Obama administration as they struggle to deal with ISIS and the expanding war in Syria. Guests include Martin Smith, Frontline filmmaker and producer of "Obama at War."
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air Philip Glass The show talks with composer Philip Glass about his life, including the early days when his music sounded so radical that some audience members threw things at him.
  • 2:00 pm
    World The Politics of an Israeli Lorde Tribute Album Pop music sensation Lorde has a big fan in Israel who tried to produce a tribute album sung in the languages of Jerusalem. The project became more twisted and political than anything by Lorde.
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace How Your Local Movie House Programs Its Screen How do single-screen movie theaters figure out which movie they're going to play each weekend?
  • 4:30 pm
    All Things Considered
    KQED News 4:30pm, 5:04pm, 5:30pm, 6:04pm & 7:04pm


  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Marketplace How Your Local Movie House Programs Its Screen How do single-screen movie theaters figure out which movie they're going to play each weekend?
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air Philip Glass The show talks with composer Philip Glass about his life, including the early days when his music sounded so radical that some audience members threw things at him.
  • 8:00 pm
    World Affairs Council Coming Together to Support Communities in Times of Crisis Crisis situations -- from acute shocks to chronic stresses -- often illuminate each sector's skills, pressures, requirements and need for nuance. For example, philanthropy's flexibility and ability to act fast allows it to play a unique role in supporting individual communities through hard times. The private sector's capacity to create and leverage innovative technologies and distribute goods and services can help rebuild cities. And finally, governments play a vital role by setting standards, establishing policies, mobilizing resources and coordinating action. It is during crises that cross-sector collaboration becomes truly imperative. And it is only through integrated prevention and response strategies that long-term resilience can be achieved. Guests include Antonio Guterres, High Commissioner for Refugees, United Nations; Neal Keny-Guyer, CEO, Mercy Corps; Olara Otunnu, President, Uganda People's Congress; President, LBL Foundation for Children; and Gayle Smith, Special Assistant to the President and Senior Director, National Security Council.
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
    Forum War Photographer Lynsey Addario Lynsey Addario is no stranger to war. The MacArthur Award-winning photographer has covered conflicts in Afghanistan, Iraq and Syria, embedding herself with soldiers and capturing rare pictures of warlords and civilians caught in the crossfire. She has also survived two kidnappings and a horrific car accident overseas. In her new memoir, "It's What I Do: A Photographer's Life of Love and War," she takes a candid look at her nomadic life and her struggle to find love and motherhood while pursuing a dangerous career.
  • 10:30 pm
    Forum Veterans Use Tattoos to Share Their War Stories War veteran Ron "Doc" Riviera says, "Every tattoo on my body tells a story. If people would just ask, they wouldn't get a movie or a book, they'd get the real thing." Riviera is part of an online exhibit called "War Ink," which uses the stories behind veterans' body art to bridge the often difficult gap between the civilian and military worlds. On this Memorial Day, we'll hear from three soldiers who participated in the project.
  • 11:00 pm
  • 12:00 am
Monday, May 25, 2015

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