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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Saturday, September 24, 2016

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, September 24, 2016
  • 12:00 am
  • 1:00 am
    KQED Newsroom Election Roundup, Cannabis Entrepreneurs, Politics and Comedy PBS NewsHour Correspondent Lisa Desjardins talks to Thuy Vu about the presidential election. The story of one entrepreneurs efforts to become the next Napa of cannabis. Scott Shafer talks to the comedians behind the podcast Politically Re-Active, W. Kamau Bell and Hari Kondabolu.Plus, listen back to an earlier interview with one of Bay Areas 2016 MacArthur geniuses Gene Yang.
  • 1:30 am
    Washington Week Countdown to the First Debate Just days before Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton square off in the first presidential debate, the 2016 campaign has once again turned its focus to national security following a series of weekend attacks that are being investigated as potential terrorism. The Republican nominee renewed his support for racial profiling by police to prevent further incidents while Clinton said Trumps comments have been used for "recruitment of terrorists." Jennifer Jacobs of Bloomberg News will explain what the candidates say they would do to prevent future terror attacks.
  • 2:00 am
    Commonwealth Club An Evening with Kareem Abdul-Jabbar Since retiring from professional basketball as the NBA's all-time leading scorer, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar has become a lauded observer of culture and society, a New York Times bestselling author, and a regular contributor to The Washington Post, Time magazine and Time.com. At a pivotal time in our history and in the midst of a presidential race that threatens to divide us, Mr. Abdul-Jabbar will give his take on the origins of bias and inequality that remain a stubborn part of America, 240 years after its founding document declared that all Americans are created equal. He contends that many Americans, out of fear and sometimes ignorance, make too many false assumptions about fellow citizens who arent like them.
  • 3:00 am
    Inside Europe E-Residency, Dying Traditions, Weaponized Bears Turning back time, Merkel style, more clever ruses in politics; the social stigma of being alone in the Netherlands. Post-Brexit, could E-residency offer Brits another way back into Europe? The demise of an age old tradition in Spain. Jewish history remembered in Slovakia and Venice. And how bears seem to be becoming one of Putin's not so secret weapons.
  • 4:00 am
    World Affairs Council Trapped in the Forever War When President George W. Bush declared the war on terror after September 11, 2001, the United States was plunged into a global conflict with no clear objectives. Today, nearly fifteen years later, there is still no end in sight. In addition to the wars original enemy, Al Qaeda, the US is in conflict with other jihadist and terrorist organizations, including ISIS. What has the investment of resources by the United States and its allies achieved in this ever widening conflict and why has the United States, the most formidable military force in the world, so far failed to defeat its enemies?
  • 5:00 am
    Weekend Edition The Lesser Bohemians Eimear McBride's new novel The Lesser Bohemians, has drawn comparisons to James Joyce for its extraordinary prose style. She talks about the intricacies of the relationship between her central characters -- two artists living and loving in London's bohemia.
  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
  • 9:00 am
  • 10:00 am
  • 11:00 am
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    This American Life The Problem We All Live With Right now, all sorts of people are trying to rethink and reinvent education, to get poor minority kids performing as well as white kids. But there's one thing nobody tries anymore, despite lots of evidence that it works: desegregation. Nikole Hannah-Jones looks at a district that, not long ago, accidentally launched a desegregation program.
  • 1:00 pm
    Snap Judgment Breakout There's a place they want you to be and your only hope your only chance to make the life you deserve is to breakout. On the next Snap Judgment LIVE! recorded where dreams are born. "The Breakout Special" Snap Judgment LIVE. Storytellers with a beat.
  • 2:00 pm
    Radiolab Donation and Mutation Where do you find comfort after the death of a child? In this episode, follow one couple as they discover a sense of purpose in an unlikely place: a clinical world where human parts are used for research. In this surprising journey, Ross and Sarah Gray gain a view of science that is redemptive, fussy facts that are tender, and parts of a loved one that add up to something unexpected. Then, get a glimpse at a technology on the cusp of radically changing how we think about the effect of scientific advancements on humanity. Hidden inside some of the worlds smallest organisms is one of the most powerful tools scientists have ever stumbled across.
  • 3:00 pm
    Freakonomics Radio Ten Signs You Might be a Libertarian This week on Freakonomics Radio, the other presidential candidate, Libertarian Gary Johnson. The Libertarian Party-- and other third parties-- probably have no chance at winning this years presidential election. Even still, Johnson likes to say that most Americans are Libertarians but dont know it yet. Could you be one of them?
  • 4:00 pm
    Reveal -- From the Center for Investigative Reporting Russias New Scapegoats A Russian journalist is murdered in St. Petersburg not for what hes reported, but for being gay. Reveal exposes what it's really like to be gay in Russia and neighboring countries today, where hateful rhetoric against the LGBT community appears on a daily basis on TV and out of the mouths of politicians. Reveal traces the roots of the anti-gay movement and shows how President Vladimir Putin uses this agenda to quash political dissent, exert influence on neighboring nations and bash the West.
  • 5:00 pm
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    A Prairie Home Companion That Fall Feeling This week its another fall rebroadcast from the Fitzgerald Theater in Saint Paul, Minnesota, this one originally from October 2009. The boys of Wilco stop by to play "One By One" and "Passenger Side" and add a touch of rock'n'roll to the corner of Exchange and Wabasha, and a blast of bluegrass from singer Patty Loveless, including "The Bramble and the Rose" and "Prisoner's Tears." Plus: our Royal Academy of Radio Actors with a message from Beebopareebop Rhubarb Pie featuring the revolutionary Thermal Thong, Dusty and Lefty head out of Minnesota just before winter descends, and Rich Dworsky and the Guy's All-Star Shoe Band play "Rockin' Past Bedtime." In Lake Wobegon, the host recalls an autumn morning that changed him forever.
  • 8:00 pm
    Selected Shorts Celebrating Jane Eyre Guest host Cynthia Nixon presents a celebration of Charlotte Brontes Jane Eyre. To mark the 200th anniversary of the classic novel, the writer Tracy Chevalier was approached to create an anthology, inviting contemporary writers to pen stories inspired by it. The result was Reader, I Married Him: Stories Inspired by Jane Eyre. On this program, youll hear Tony Award winner Joanna Gleason (Into the Woods) read from the original. Then, a rebuttal from Rochester, in Salley Vickers Reader, She Married Me, read by Chris Sarandon. The final story is by Audrey Niffenegger, who chose to look at an earlier period in Jane Eyres difficult life: her time at the orphanage. The Orphan Exchange, is read by Tovah Feldshuh.
  • 9:00 pm
    This American Life The Problem We All Live With Right now, all sorts of people are trying to rethink and reinvent education, to get poor minority kids performing as well as white kids. But there's one thing nobody tries anymore, despite lots of evidence that it works: desegregation. Nikole Hannah-Jones looks at a district that, not long ago, accidentally launched a desegregation program.
  • 10:00 pm
    The Moth Radio Hour GrandSLAMS Coast to Coast In this hour, Moth GrandSLAM stories from around the country. PTSD, a transgender teen, college, eBay, prison, eye contact and the emergency room. Hosted by The Moths Senior Producer, Jenifer Hixson.
  • 11:00 pm
    Snap Judgment Breakout There's a place they want you to be and your only hope your only chance to make the life you deserve is to breakout. On the next Snap Judgment LIVE! recorded where dreams are born. "The Breakout Special" Snap Judgment LIVE. Storytellers with a beat.
  • 12:00 am
    Radiolab Donation and Mutation Where do you find comfort after the death of a child? In this episode, we follow one couple as they discover a sense of purpose in an unlikely place: a clinical world where human parts are used for research. In this surprising journey, Ross and Sarah Gray gain a view of science that is redemptive, fussy facts that are tender, and parts of a loved one that add up to something unexpected. Then, we get a glimpse at a technology on the cusp of radically changing how we think about the effect of scientific advancements on humanity. Hidden inside some of the worlds smallest organisms is one of the most powerful tools scientists have ever stumbled across. It's a defense system that has existed in bacteria for millions of years and it may someday let us change the course of human evolution.
Saturday, September 24, 2016

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