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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Saturday, February 28, 2015

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, February 28, 2015
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Leonard Nimoy Dies at 83 Mr. Spock has died. Though he was a published author, photographer and recording artist, Leonard Nimoy will forever be remembered for his role in "Star Trek." Nimoy died Friday at his home in Los Angeles. He suffered from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. He was 83 years old.
  • 1:00 am
    KQED Newsroom Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors Approve Purchase of Controversial Cellphone Tracking DeviceSergeant Kurtis Stenderup from the Santa Clara County Sheriff's office and Jennifer Lynch from the Electronic Frontier Foundation weigh in on what the device can be used for and whether there's a threat to public privacy.
  • 1:30 am
    Washington Week The Latest on the DHS Funding Standoff John Harwood of CNBC and Juana Summers of NPR will have the latest on the congressional standoff over funding the Department of Homeland Security and President Obama's executive action on immigration reform.
  • 2:00 am
    Commonwealth Club HUD Secretary Julian Castro on Greening Buildings Buildings are the big kahuna when it comes to fighting climate change. Forty percent of carbon emissions in the United States come from buildings and the electricity that goes into them. Energy and water-wise buildings are now trendy in many downtown office towers, driven mainly by market forces. Julian Castro, secretary of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), wants to take energy efficiency and new financing models to multifamily developments and federal housing communities. Secretary Castro will also talk about HUD's efforts to help create greener communities and fight climate change.
  • 3:00 am
    Inside Europe Greece Thrown an Economic Lifeline Greece was thrown an economic lifeline this week. After weeks of negotiations with international creditors and its EU partners, Athens was offered a four-month extension of its financial bailout. In return, Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras committed his government to a series of reforms.
  • 4:00 am
    It's Your World (a broadcast of the World Affairs Council) Redefining Philanthropy and Decision-Making in Philanthropy: A Science or an Art? Darren Walker, the tenth president of the Ford Foundation, reflects upon the foundation's influence on his life, the current environment for social change, and his thoughts on how philanthropy is being redefined.
  • 5:00 am
  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
    Weekend Edition
    Perspectives7:36am & 8:36am

  • 9:00 am
  • 10:00 am
    The Best of Car Talk Click and Clack tackle the tougher questions of the automobile world.
  • 11:00 am
    Wait, Wait Don't Tell Me This quiz show takes a fresh, fast-paced and irreverent look at the week's events.
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    This American Life Except For That One Thing Mike Anderson was 36-years-old, married and a suburban father of four. He owned a contracting business and built his family's modest, three-bedroom house in St. Louis from the ground up. He volunteered at church on the weekends and coaches his son's football team. All pretty normal ... right? Except for one thing ... which surfaced one day two summers ago.
  • 1:00 pm
    Radiolab Desperately Seeking Symmetry The show sets out in search of order and balance in the world around us, and asks how symmetry shapes our very existence -- from the origins of the universe, to what we see when we look in the mirror. Along the way, the program looks for love in ancient Greece, heads to modern-day Princeton to peer inside our brains and turns up an unlikely headline from the Oval Office circa 1979.
  • 2:00 pm
    Radio Specials Re:sound - The Failure of Flight Show In this hour, hear stories about the failure of flight. In one story a man mysteriously falls from the sky onto a sunny London street, and in another, a plane crashes into a mountainside, and an 11-year-old walks away.
  • 3:00 pm
  • 3:30 pm
    Radio Specials A Wizard of Earthsea: A Big Read Documentary Ursula K. Le Guin's "A Wizard of Earthsea" is arguably the most widely admired American fantasy novel of the past 50 years. The book's elegant diction, geographical sweep and mounting suspense are quite irresistible. Earthsea - composed of an archipelago of many islands - is a land of the imagination, like Oz, Faerie or the dream-like realm of our unconscious. Earthsea may not be a "real" world but it is one that our souls recognize as meaningful and "true." Actions there possess an epic grandeur, a mythic resonance that we associate with romance and fairy tale.
  • 4:00 pm
    Living On Earth The Rogue Federal Program For more than a century, a U.S. federal program called Wildlife Services has been operating in the shadows. It's funded by private interests and taxpayer money, and now kills millions of animals, some inhumanely. As the Center for Biological Diversity's Amy Atwood explains, this slaughter is mostly not in service of the animals or ecosystem and has little regulation, transparency or accountability.
  • 5:00 pm
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    A Prairie Home Companion Born to Ramble This week, we're heading west across the Mississippi for a live broadcast from the State Theatre in Minneapolis, Minnesota with special guests, folk-rock singer and songwriter Brandi Carlile and gospel grandmaster Jearlyn Steele. Plus, the Royal Academy of Radio Actors, Tim Russell, Sue Scott and Fred Newman; musical director and pianist Richard Dworsky with The Steady Shovellers (drummer Jonathan Dresel, Larry Kohut on bass, guitarist Dean Magraw, and Richard Kriehn on mandolin and fiddle); and the latest News from Lake Wobegon.
  • 8:00 pm
    Selected Shorts Against the Odds Guest host Jane Kaczmarek presents two stories about people who beat the odds. In Lauren Groff's "At the Round Earth's Imagined Corners," read by Amy Ryan, a sensitive boy grows up in a house full of snakes. Then, writer Kiese Laymon recalls coming of age in racist Jackson, Mississippi in his memoir "How to Slowly Kill Yourself and Others in America," read by Brandon J. Dirden.
  • 9:00 pm
    This American Life Except For That One Thing Mike Anderson was 36-years-old, married and a suburban father of four. He owned a contracting business and built his family's modest, three-bedroom house in St. Louis from the ground up. He volunteered at church on the weekends and coaches his son's football team. All pretty normal ... right? Except for one thing ... which surfaced one day two summers ago.
  • 10:00 pm
    The Moth Radio Hour Two Weddings and a Prison Break Writer and bon vivant, Simon Doonan, sets out on a mission to fulfill a childhood desire; a secret finally catches up with a suburban housewife and mother; a college drop out finds himself in the unlikeliest of places and a young woman sets out to sabotage the wedding of the man she loves.
  • 11:00 pm
  • 12:00 am
    Radiolab Desperately Seeking Symmetry The show sets out in search of order and balance in the world around us, and asks how symmetry shapes our very existence -- from the origins of the universe, to what we see when we look in the mirror. Along the way, the program looks for love in ancient Greece, heads to modern-day Princeton to peer inside our brains and turns up an unlikely headline from the Oval Office circa 1979.
Saturday, February 28, 2015

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Radio Specials

Every week, KQED airs some of the best programs from independent radio producers and public radio networks around the world.