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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Monday, January 22, 2018

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Monday, January 22, 2018
  • 12:00 am
    On the Media The #MeToo Backlash Begins This week, the online magazine Babe published an expos describing a sexual encounter between comedian Aziz Ansari and "Grace," an anonymous woman, in which consent lines were blurred, though not necessarily crossed. Thus, a new and contentious phase in the #MeToo movement began. Some critics, like The Atlantic's Caitlin Flanagan and the New York Times' Bari Weiss, argued that this was a case of unnecessary humiliation, bringing an everyday encounter into the frame of a movement that's better focused on clear-cut cases of assault. Others argued that the article sparked an important and long overdue dialogue around consent. Brooke speaks with Vox.com's Caroline Framke about why this case is different from the #MeToo revelations thus far and where the conversation might be going from here.
  • 1:00 am
    Latino USA Taking Back the Trees The small town of Chern in Michoacn, Mexico sits amidst pine trees, and most of its residents make money off of the resin they tap. But when drug cartels turned their attention to Chern's pine trees and began illegally logging them to make a quick buck, the townspeople decided that enough was enough. Plusthe story of a man who became a wrestling champion despite being born with only one leg. And, Spanish indie-pop artist El Guincho breaks down his production process.
  • 2:00 am
    Marketplace Weekend Trump Year One, College Credit Its been a year since the Trump administration took office what the past year has meant for regulations. Plus, getting students college credit while theyre in high school has been all the rage but where exactly is the payoff?
  • 3:00 am
  • 5:00 am
  • MORNING
  • 9:00 am
    Forum Monday Morning Political Roundup We'll bring you analysis of the latest news out of Washington D.C. and a look back at President Trump's first year.
  • 10:00 am
    Forum Council on Foreign Relations' Richard Haass on New National Defense Strategy The most significant shift in national defense strategy in almost two decades was unveiled last week by US Defense Secretary James Mattis. The big takeaway: Competition from global leaders like China and Russia is now the biggest threat to national security, replacing the fight against terrorism. Council on Foreign Relations president Richard Haass joins us to dissect the new strategy, and to discuss how best to tackle the most pressing U.S. foreign policy challenges at a time when populism is rewriting the old world order.
  • 11:00 am
    Here & Now Sporty Norwich With the Winter Olympics less than a month away, we look at the tremendous success of the tiny Vermont town of Norwich, which has sent an athlete to every winter Olympics, except one, since 1984.
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    The Takeaway Rising Civic Engagement A year after the Womens March, we hear from a researcher who surveyed participants at that and other major demonstrations over the last year. Her findings show increased civic engagement over the course of 2017 -- more people contacting elected officials, attending town halls, and getting involved in other ways beyond just voting.
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air How Democracies Die Harvard professors Steven Levitsky and Daniel Ziblatt are the authors of the new book How Democracies Die. They spent more than twenty years studying the breakdown of democracies in Europe and Latin America, and they believe that American Democracy is in danger. They'll discuss the manner in which other democracies have withered - it's not about coups anymore, and what norms must be in place to help protect democracy.
  • 2:00 pm
    World Polish Women Call Out Their Government Women are mobilizing and marching in Poland. They're defying a notoriously far-right government. That they see as rolling back their reproductive rights. Poland's abortion laws are already among the most restrictive in Europe. Now proposed legislation could lead to an outright ban.
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace Tipping Rules The Department of Labor is working on a new rule that could change what happens to the tips you leave at restaurants. The proposed rule is in what's called the "public comment" period right now. A look at where those comments are coming from, and the role they play in policymaking.
  • 4:30 pm
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Marketplace Tipping Rules The Department of Labor is working on a new rule that could change what happens to the tips you leave at restaurants. The proposed rule is in what's called the "public comment" period right now. A look at where those comments are coming from, and the role they play in policymaking.
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air How Democracies Die Harvard professors Steven Levitsky and Daniel Ziblatt are the authors of the new book How Democracies Die. They spent more than twenty years studying the breakdown of democracies in Europe and Latin America, and they believe that American Democracy is in danger. They'll discuss the manner in which other democracies have withered - it's not about coups anymore, and what norms must be in place to help protect democracy.
  • 8:00 pm
    World Affairs Jerusalem and North Korea: Inside President Trump's Foreign Policy From Jerusalem to North Korea, President Trump is facing unprecedented foreign policy changes some arguably of his own making, some not. Trump's diplomacy is under the microscope as tensions rise in the Middle East and Asia, so where do we go from here? In this special program, World Affairs' CEO Jane Wales talks with Janine Zacharia, former Jerusalem Bureau Chief of The Washington Post, and also David Sanger, Chief Washington Correspondent for The New York Times. Can Trump pivot away from searing rhetoric and instead work toward strengthening diplomacy abroad?
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
  • 11:00 pm
    1A with Joshua Johnson What You Need To Know To Run For Office Have you ever looked at a politician and thought, "I could do a better job than that?" You're not alone. Many Americans with a range of political experience are deciding that 2018 is their year to either run for the first time or to move up to a higher office. Across the country, newcomers are running for school boards, city councils and other posts. A record number of women are running for governor. And thousands of scientists are hoping to get into politics.
  • 12:00 am
Monday, January 22, 2018

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