Donate

Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Wednesday, October 22, 2014

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Wednesday, October 22, 2014
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Hospital Transparency and Infections More information than ever is available to the public about medical care. As part of a push toward transparency, the U.S. government has been steadily releasing information about the infections that patients contract while they're in the hospital. Jordan Rau from Kaiser Health News has conducted the first national analysis of the numbers and talks with Audie Cornish about how hospitals succeed -- and fail -- at stamping out infections.
  • 1:00 am
  • 2:00 am
    City Arts & Lectures Ebola: Beyond the Headlines Partners In Health, Last Mile Health of Liberia, and Wellbody Alliance of Sierra Leone have launched an ambitious campaign to scale up Ebola response and rebuild primary health systems serving over 1 million people. They are already working to train health workers, identify sick patients, and deliver quality care. Partners from UCSF, Berkeley, and Stanford are coming together to support the global response, which requires staff, tools, and systems to contain the outbreak. Amid this crisis lies the opportunity to strengthen local health systems to not only address Ebola, but to reduce the burden of other preventable and treatable diseases - including HIV, malaria, and tuberculosis.
  • 3:00 am
  • 5:00 am
    Morning Edition
    The California Report 5:50am, 6:50am & 8:50am

    KQED News 6am, 6:30am, 7am, 7:30am, 8am, 8:30am, 9am, 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm & 4:30pm


    Perspectives 6:06am, 7:35am & 11:30pm

  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
  • 9:00 am
    Forum Prop. G Seeks to Ease Housing Crisis by Reigning in Speculators Proposition G on San Francisco's November ballot aims to curb real estate speculation, which critics say is widespread and is driving up rents and home prices in the city. But opponents of the measure say that it won't solve the housing crisis and offers no protection for seniors or families who have to sell their property because of hardship.
  • 10:00 am
    Forum How Alcatraz Became a Canvas for Chinese Artist Ai Weiwei For the next six months, visitors to Alcatraz will encounter more than empty cells and beautiful views. The island is the site of dissident Chinese artist Ai Weiwei's new installation "@Large," a collection of works that explore themes of human rights and freedom of expression. One piece, "Trace," features portraits of prisoners of conscience and is made up of over a million Lego pieces. We'll talk to the organizers of "@Large" about the installation and about the challenges of collaborating with Ai Weiwei, who is barred from leaving China by its government.
  • 11:00 am
    Here & Now From Cult Cinema to the Stage The show gets the skinny on a new play based on an old, improbable cult movie: "Death Bed: The Bed That Eats!"
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air The Disappearing Religions of the Middle East People like the Yazidis, Coptic Christians and Assyrians, who have survived persecution over the centuries, now find themselves threatened by ISIS, other Islamists or civil war. These ancient religions offer many clues about the past. The show talks with Gerard Russell, author of "Heirs to Forgotten Kingdoms."
  • 2:00 pm
    World Fast-Tracking the Ebola Test Tech companies that develop Ebola test kits -- from China, France, the U.K. and the United States -- are all racing to get approved. And it's not just about making money.
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace A Russian Oligarch on Success of Sanctions What does a Russian oligarch under house arrest say about the success of sanctions the U.S. and Europe have levied over Ukraine?
  • 4:30 pm
    All Things Considered
    KQED News 4:30pm, 5:04pm, 5:30pm, 6:04pm & 7:04pm


    Blackwater Guards Guilty in 2007 Shooting of Iraqi Citizens -- A federal jury found four former security guards with the company Blackwater guilty in connection with the shooting of dozens of Iraqi citizens in 2007 at a Baghdad traffic circle. That shooting revealed the leeway given outside contractors and became a symbol of the U.S. intervention in Iraq.
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Marketplace A Russian Oligarch on Success of Sanctions What does a Russian oligarch under house arrest say about the success of sanctions the U.S. and Europe have levied over Ukraine?
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air The Disappearing Religions of the Middle East People like the Yazidis, Coptic Christians and Assyrians, who have survived persecution over the centuries, now find themselves threatened by ISIS, other Islamists or civil war. These ancient religions offer many clues about the past. The show talks with Gerard Russell, author of "Heirs to Forgotten Kingdoms."
  • 8:00 pm
    Radio Specials America Abroad Women's Rights After the Arab Spring -- The revolutions of the Arab Spring promised greater freedoms for the people of the Middle East. But while some freedoms have been gained, stability has been lost. In many cases, it's become more dangerous, especially for women. The program visits Egypt, where under the newly adopted constitution, women are supposed to have equality in "all civil, political, economic, social, and cultural rights." The show also hears from Turkey, as women there feel the effects of newly empowered religious conservative parties - and from women in Kuwait, who relate their day-to-day lives.
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
    Forum Prop. G Seeks to Ease Housing Crisis by Reigning in Speculators Proposition G on San Francisco's November ballot aims to curb real estate speculation, which critics say is widespread and is driving up rents and home prices in the city. But opponents of the measure say that it won't solve the housing crisis and offers no protection for seniors or families who have to sell their property because of hardship.
  • 11:00 pm
    All Things Considered China iCloud Hack The sophisticated assault on iCloud in China has a name. It's called a "man in the middle attack." The perpetrators got hold of iCloud user data as it moved across the Internet and were able to steal the information without ever breaching Apple's servers. The attack coincided with the release of the iPhone 6, which has stronger security than its predecessors.
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered California's Severed Drought Over the Long Term The extreme drought in California is showing no signs of easing. Forecasters keep downgrading the likelihood that an El Nino weather pattern will bring much relief this winter either. The state's largest water utility just announced that major rationing is looming. And many officials are warning the extreme conditions could be a harbinger of much drier and hotter times to come.
Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Navigate By Date

Calendar is loading...
Become a KQED sponsor

Radio Specials

Every week, KQED airs some of the best programs from independent radio producers and public radio networks around the world.