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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Tuesday, September 1, 2015

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Tuesday, September 1, 2015
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Trump Doesn't Own Most Trump Buildings in Manhattan Donald Trump became famous as a real estate developer in Manhattan and plenty of buildings there still bear his name. But he doesn't actually own most of them and never did.
  • 1:00 am
  • 2:00 am
    World Affairs Council A Competition Between Systems: Good Governance or Corruption This week's program focuses on good governance and corruption in Africa. We'll discuss the importance of transparency and ethical leadership in promoting broad-based growth and inclusive development.
  • 3:00 am
    Morning Edition The High-Stakes Conservation Battle Over Sage Grouse There are only 400,000 greater sage grouse left in the West. Environmentalists want the bird protected under the Endangered Species Act. But that would threaten farming and drilling operations, which could cost billions in local revenues.
  • 5:00 am
    Morning Edition
    The California Report 5:50am, 6:50am & 8:50am

    KQED News 6am, 6:30am, 7am, 7:30am, 8am, 8:30am, 9am, 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm & 4:30pm


    Perspectives 6:43am, 8:43am & 11:29pm

  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
  • 9:00 am
    Forum Legionnaire's Outbreak Continues at San Quentin Prison San Quentin State Prison is in its second week of battling an outbreak of Legionnaire's disease. Since Friday, six inmates have tested positive for the bacterial pneumonia, with more than 70 other inmates displaying symptoms. Prison officials have turned off water taps and showers and even briefly shut off access to toilets, in an effort to prevent the bacteria, which is spread through water vapor, from spreading. We'll talk about possible causes of the outbreak and efforts to contain it.
  • 9:30 am
    Forum Major Development in Pelican Bay Solitary Confinement Case Back in 2011, a hunger strike by inmates at Pelican Bay State Prison exposed harsh conditions at special security units. The action fueled a major federal lawsuit alleging some inmates had been held in solitary confinement for decades. We look at a major development in the case.
  • 10:00 am
    Forum The Rise of Coding Bootcamps The demand for computer programmers is on the rise. The job site Glassdoor shows 7,300 nationwide job openings for coders so far this year -- and coding bootcamps are answering the call. These intensive multi-week courses promise to provide enough skills to land a coveted programing job. The courses are expected to produce 16,000 coders this year, twice as many as last year. In March, the White House even announced an initiative to help communities hire graduates of these intensive courses. Are coding bootcamps worth the investment, and do they live up to their promises?
  • 11:00 am
    Here & Now Can Harbaugh Put the Fight Back Into Michigan Football? It's time for college football, and Michigan hopes favorite son Jim Harbaugh can put the fight back into its storied program.
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    The Takeaway How Would Shell Oil Drilling Impact the Arctic? President Obama is the first sitting president to visit the Alaskan Arctic. He's been criticized for promoting environmental protection after allowing Shell to drill in the region. The show looks at the economic and environmental impact of Shell's proposed drilling.
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air Jonathan Franzen on 'Purity' Jonathan Franzen talks about his new novel "Purity," which, in part, is about secrets and the people who can keep, them and those who can't. Franzen's other novels include the bestsellers "The Corrections" and "Freedom."
  • 2:00 pm
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace Minority Outreach on Campus Are elite colleges doing enough to make low-income and minority students feel welcome when they get to campus?
  • 4:30 pm
    All Things Considered
    KQED News 4:30pm, 5:04pm, 5:30pm, 6:04pm & 7:04pm


    Hungarian Leader Adopts Anti-Migrant Platform -- Besieged Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban has adopted a staunchly anti-migrant platform in recent months -- including a xenophobic billboard campaign and race to build a controversial border fence -- to try and win back supporters and lure voters away from the far right, which is making significant gains in Hungarian local and parliamentary elections.
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Marketplace Minority Outreach on Campus Are elite colleges doing enough to make low-income and minority students feel welcome when they get to campus?
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air Jonathan Franzen on 'Purity' Jonathan Franzen talks about his new novel "Purity," which, in part, is about secrets and the people who can keep, them and those who can't. Franzen's other novels include the bestsellers "The Corrections" and "Freedom."
  • 8:00 pm
    City Arts & Lectures Judd Apatow Director, writer and producer Judd Apatow is well known for his distinct comedic style and involvement in a collection of "foulmouthed straight-man-love movies." Apatow's prolific collection of films includes "Pineapple Express," "The 40 Year-Old Virgin" and "Knocked Up." He's supported and broken stars such as Steve Carrell, Seth Rogen, and James Franco. Apatow started his career performing stand-up comedy at the age of 17, and wrote for "The Ben Stiller Show" at 24. "I Found This Funny" is a new compilation edited by Apatow of some of his favorite authors -- ranging from F. Scott Fitzgerald to David Foster Wallace. He appears in conversation with Dave Eggers, author of "A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius," "You Shall Know Our Velocity" and "What is the What."
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
    Forum The Rise of Coding Bootcamps The demand for computer programmers is on the rise. The job site Glassdoor shows 7,300 nationwide job openings for coders so far this year -- and coding bootcamps are answering the call. These intensive multi-week courses promise to provide enough skills to land a coveted programing job. The courses are expected to produce 16,000 coders this year, twice as many as last year. In March, the White House even announced an initiative to help communities hire graduates of these intensive courses. Are coding bootcamps worth the investment, and do they live up to their promises?
  • 11:00 pm
    All Things Considered Smell Maps A University of California, Berkeley psychologist has found that people can create a map in their heads with scents as location markers. NPR replicates the experiment with a master sommelier, and discovers that olfactory navigation is lot more successful if you have a sophisticated nose.
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Obama Wants New Arctic Icebreakers President Obama is in Alaska calling for Congress to fund the construction of new Coast Guard icebreakers. The president said the Arctic is growing in importance, and the Coast Guard's icebreakers aren't keeping pace with the challenge. The Coast Guard has two heavy icebreakers, down from seven during World War II.
Tuesday, September 1, 2015

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