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KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9, KQET

KQED 9 / KQET

Channels 9.1, 54.2, 25.1
XFINITY 9 and HD 709
Wave 9 and HD 164
DirecTV, Dish Network, AT&T U-verse: Channel # may vary, labeled as KQED, or as KQET in the 831 area code

All HD programs

KQED Plus, KQET

KQED Plus / KQET

Channels 54.1, 9.2, 25.2
XFINITY 10 and HD 710
Wave 10
DirecTV, Dish Network, AT&T U-verse: IF this channel provided to customer, channel # may vary, labeled as KQEH

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life

Channel 54.3
XFINITY 189
Wave 157

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World

Channel 9.3
XFINITY 190
Wave 156

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me

Channel 54.5 & 25.3
XFINITY 191 & 621
Wave 154

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids

Channel 54.4
XFINITY 192
Wave 155

Quality children's programming parents love too

KQED Newsletters

Newsletters

Get regular updates on great programs and events

More from KQED

Upcoming Broadcasts:

The Scripture of Nature (1851-1890) (#101#) Duration: 1:56:46 SRND51 TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)

In 1851, word spreads across the country of a beautiful area of California's Yosemite Valley, attracting visitors who wish to exploit the land's scenery for commercial gain and those who wish to keep it pristine. Among the latter is a Scottish-born wanderer named John Muir, for whom protecting the land becomes a spiritual calling. In 1864, Congress passes an act that protects Yosemite from commercial development for "public use, resort and recreation" - the first time in world history that any government has put forth this idea - and hands control of the land to California. Meanwhile, a "wonderland" in the northwest corner of the Wyoming territory attracts visitors to its bizarre landscape of geysers, mud pots and sulfur pits. In 1872, Congress passes an act to protect this land as well. Since it is located in a territory, rather than a state, it becomes America's first national park: Yellowstone.

Upcoming Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Tue, Jun 7, 2016 -- 5:00am Remind me
  • KQED World: Tue, Jun 7, 2016 -- 11:00am Remind me

The Last Refuge (1890-1915) (#102#) Duration: 2:26:46 SRND51 TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)

By the end of the 19th century, widespread industrialization has left many Americans worried about whether the country - once a vast wilderness - will have any pristine land left. At the same time, poachers in the parks are rampant, and visitors think nothing of littering or carving their names near iconic sites like Old Faithful. Congress has yet to establish clear judicial authority or appropriations for the protection of the parks. This sparks a conservation movement by organizations such as the Sierra Club, led by John Muir; the Audubon Society, led by George Bird Grinnell; and the Boone and Crockett Club, led by Theodore Roosevelt. The movement fails, however, to stop San Francisco from building the Hetch Hetchy dam at Yosemite, flooding Muir's "mountain temple" and leaving him broken-hearted before he dies.

Upcoming Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Tue, Jun 14, 2016 -- 5:00am Remind me
  • KQED World: Tue, Jun 14, 2016 -- 11:00am Remind me

The Empire of Grandeur (1915-1919) (#103#) Duration: 1:53:21 SRND51 TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)

In the early 20th century, America has a dozen national parks, but they are a haphazard patchwork of special places under the supervision of different federal agencies. The conservation movement, after failing to stop the Hetch Hetchy dam, pushes the government to establish one unified agency to oversee all the parks, leading to the establishment of the National Park Service in 1916. Its first director, Stephen Mather, a wealthy businessman and passionate park advocate who fought vigorously to establish the NPS, launches an energetic campaign to expand the national park system and bring more visitors to the parks. Among his efforts is to protect the Grand Canyon from encroaching commercial interests and establish it as a national park, rather than a national monument.

Upcoming Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Tue, Jun 21, 2016 -- 5:00am Remind me
  • KQED World: Tue, Jun 21, 2016 -- 11:00am Remind me

Going Home (1920-1933) (#104#) Duration: 1:57:55 SRND51 TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)

While visiting the parks was once predominantly the domain of Americans wealthy enough to afford the high-priced train tours, the advent of the automobile allows more people than ever before to visit the parks. Mather embraces this opportunity and works to build more roads in the parks. Some park enthusiasts, such as Margaret and Edward Gehrke of Nebraska, begin "collecting" parks, making a point to visit as many as they can. In North Carolina, Horace Kephart, a reclusive writer, and George Masa, a Japanese immigrant, launch a campaign to protect the last strands of virgin forest in the Smoky Mountains by establishing it as a park. In Wyoming, John D. Rockefeller Jr. begins quietly buying up land in the Teton Mountain Range and valley in a secret plan to donate it to the government as a park.

Upcoming Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Tue, Jun 28, 2016 -- 5:00am Remind me
  • KQED World: Tue, Jun 28, 2016 -- 11:00am Remind me

Also on KQED.org this week ...

Recycling Demystified on Bay Curious
How Does "Bay Curious" Work?

We collect questions about any Bay Area topic that tickles your fancy.

The community chooses which question they most want answered.

KQED reporters investigate the story with your help.

We discover the answer together!

Art School - Brendan Monroe
Go to KQED Art School

Discover the secrets of contemporary art with KQED Art School, featuring artist interviews and how-to videos that reveal new ways to get creative and learn about art.

Lessons feature painting, sculpture, dance, photography and more!

Sponsored by