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Upcoming Broadcasts:

Vaccines - Calling The Shots (#4114H) Duration: 56:01 STEREO TVPG

Diseases that were largely eradicated 40 years ago are returning. Across the world, children are getting sick and dying from preventable conditions because nervous parents are skipping their children's shots. How do parents decide whether to vaccinate or not, and what are the risks to the child and to society? Featuring research scientists, pediatricians, psychologists, anthropologists, and parents, this program travels the globe to look at the science behind vaccinations, track epidemics, and investigate the serious human costs of opting out.

Upcoming Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Sat, Aug 29, 2015 -- 10:00pm
  • KQED World: Sun, Aug 30, 2015 -- 3:00pm Remind me
  • KQED Life: Mon, Aug 31, 2015 -- 8:00pm Remind me
  • KQED Life: Tue, Sep 1, 2015 -- 2:00am Remind me

Bigger Than T.rex (#4119H) Duration: 56:46 STEREO TVPG

Almost a century ago, paleontologists found the first tantalizing hints of a monster even bigger than Tyrannosaurus rex, perhaps the largest predator ever to roam the Earth: spectacular fossil bones from a dinosaur dubbed Spinosaurus. But the fossils were completely destroyed during a World War II Allied bombing raid, leaving only drawings, questions, and a mystery: What was Spinosaurus?
Now, the discovery of new bones in a Moroccan cliff face is reopening the investigation into this epic beast. What did it feed on and how? Why did it grow so big? We follow the paleontologists who are reconstructing this terrifying carnivore, revealing a 53-foot-long behemoth with a huge dorsal sail, enormous, scimitar-like claws, and massive jaws tapered toward the front like a crocodile. Bringing together experts in paleontology, geology, climatology and paleobotany, this Nova/National Geographic special brings to life the lost world over which Spinosaurus reigned more than 65 million years ago.

Upcoming Broadcasts:

  • KQED 9: Wed, Sep 2, 2015 -- 9:00pm Remind me
  • KQED 9: Thu, Sep 3, 2015 -- 3:00am Remind me
  • KQED World: Fri, Sep 4, 2015 -- 5:00am Remind me
  • KQED World: Fri, Sep 4, 2015 -- 11:00am Remind me
  • KQED World: Sun, Sep 6, 2015 -- 2:00pm Remind me
  • KQED Life: Mon, Sep 7, 2015 -- 8:00pm Remind me
  • KQED Life: Tue, Sep 8, 2015 -- 2:00am Remind me
  • KQED 9: Wed, Sep 9, 2015 -- 1:30pm Remind me

Why Planes Vanish (#4116H) Duration: 55:11 STEREO TVPG

The disappearance of Flight MH370 stunned the world. In an era of smart-phones and GPS, how could a 270-ton passenger jet vanish into thin air? It was a rude awakening for all of us, showing just how far we are from the world we imagined we lived in - in which every move is monitored all the time. Nova tells the inside story of the search for Flight MH370 and meets the key players, from all corners of the globe, who have spent months searching for the lost plane. How easy is it to make a plane disappear? Or can new technology guarantee that in the future, nothing will ever be "lost" again?

Upcoming Broadcasts:

  • KQED Life: Thu, Sep 3, 2015 -- 7:00pm Remind me
  • KQED Life: Fri, Sep 4, 2015 -- 1:00am Remind me

Mystery of Easter Island (#3914H) Duration: 55:21 STEREO TVPG

A remote, bleak speck of rock in the middle of the Pacific, Easter Island, or Rapa Nui, has mystified the world ever since the first Europeans arrived in 1722. How and why did the ancient islanders build and move nearly 900 giant statues or moai, weighing up to 86 tons? And how did they transform a presumed paradise into a treeless wasteland, bringing ruin upon their island and themselves? Nova explores controversial recent claims that challenge decades of previous thinking about the islanders, who have been accused of everything from ecocide to cannibalism. Among the radical new theories is that the islanders used ropes to "walk" the statues upright, like moving a fridge. With the help of an accurate 15-ton replica statue, a Nova team sets out to test this high-risk, seemingly unlikely theory.

Upcoming Broadcasts:

  • KQED Plus: Sun, Sep 6, 2015 -- 11:00pm Remind me
  • KQED Plus: Mon, Sep 7, 2015 -- 5:00am Remind me
  • KQED Plus: Sun, Sep 13, 2015 -- 11:00am Remind me

Making Stuff Faster (#4018H) Duration: 54:36 STEREO TVPG

In this mini-series, New York Times' technology correspondent and best-selling author David Pogue takes a wild ride through the cutting-edge science that is powering a next wave of technological innovation. With his humor and zest for discovery, Pogue meets the scientists and engineers who are plunging to the bottom of the temperature scale, finding design inspiration in nature, and breaking every speed limit to make tomorrow's "stuff" colder, faster, wilder and safer.

Upcoming Broadcasts:

  • KQED Life: Fri, Sep 11, 2015 -- 7:00pm Remind me

Making Stuff Safer (#4021H) Duration: 54:35 STEREO TVPG

In this mini-series, New York Times' technology correspondent and best-selling author David Pogue takes a wild ride through the cutting-edge science that is powering a next wave of technological innovation. With his humor and zest for discovery, Pogue meets the scientists and engineers who are plunging to the bottom of the temperature scale, finding design inspiration in nature, and breaking every speed limit to make tomorrow's "stuff" colder, faster, wilder and safer.

Upcoming Broadcasts:

  • KQED Life: Fri, Sep 11, 2015 -- 8:00pm Remind me

Secrets of the Viking Sword (#3913H) Duration: 55:11 STEREO TVPG

The Vikings were among the fiercest warriors of all time. Yet only a select few carried the ultimate weapon of their era: the feared Ulfberht sword. Fashioned using a process that would remain unknown to the Vikings' rivals for centuries, the Ulfberht was a revolutionary high-tech tool as well as a work of art. Considered one of the greatest swords ever made, it remains a fearsome weapon more than a millennium after it last saw battle. But how did Viking sword makers design and build the Ulfberht, and what was its role in history? Now, Nova uses cutting edge science and old-fashioned detective work to reconstruct the Ulfberht and finally unravel the "Mystery of the Viking Sword."

Upcoming Broadcasts:

  • KQED Plus: Sun, Sep 13, 2015 -- 11:00pm Remind me
  • KQED Plus: Mon, Sep 14, 2015 -- 5:00am Remind me

Zeppelin Terror Attack (#4102H) Duration: 54:16 STEREO TVPG

Nova reveals the untold story of the biggest flying machines ever made: Germany's war zeppelins, which rained down death on British towns for two and a half terrifying years during World War I. In hands-on experiments, Nova uncovers how the zeppelins were built and flown, and goes inside the desperate scramble to take down the zeppelins and make the streets of Britain safe again.

Upcoming Broadcasts:

  • KQED Life: Mon, Sep 14, 2015 -- 8:00pm Remind me
  • KQED Life: Tue, Sep 15, 2015 -- 2:00am Remind me

Dawn of Humanity (#4209H) Duration: 1:56:46 STEREO TVPG

Nova and National Geographic present exclusive access to an astounding discovery of ancient fossil human ancestors. Located in an almost inaccessible chamber deep in a South African cave, the site required recruiting a special team of experts slender enough to squeeze through a maze of passages. They have brought to light an unprecedented wealth of fossils belonging to a crucial gap in the record of our origins that spans the transition between the ape-like australopithecines (such as the famous Lucy) and the earliest members of the human family. At the center of the discovery is paleoanthropologist Lee Berger, a big character, brimming with enthusiasm and opinions, whose claims have stirred long controversy in the contentious field of human origins. Join Nova as we solve a two million year-old "crime scene" and dig into extraordinary new clues about what made us human.

Upcoming Broadcasts:

  • KQED 9: Wed, Sep 16, 2015 -- 9:00pm Remind me
  • KQED 9: Thu, Sep 17, 2015 -- 3:00am Remind me
  • KQED World: Fri, Sep 18, 2015 -- 6:00am Remind me
  • KQED World: Fri, Sep 18, 2015 -- 12:00pm Remind me
  • KQED World: Sun, Sep 20, 2015 -- 3:00pm Remind me
  • KQED Life: Mon, Sep 21, 2015 -- 8:00pm Remind me
  • KQED Life: Tue, Sep 22, 2015 -- 2:00am Remind me

Inside Animal Minds: Dogs & Super Senses (#4109H) Duration: 55:41 STEREO TVG

What is it like to be a dog, a shark, or a bird? Long the subject of human daydreams, this question is now getting serious attention from scientists who study animal senses. The senses define our experience of the world - they shape our minds, and help make us what we are. Humans rely on smell, sight, taste, touch, and sound, but other animals have super-powered versions of these senses, and a few, like electrically-sensitive sharks, even have extra senses we don't have at all. From a dog who seems to use smell to tell time, to a dolphin who can "see" with his ears, we will discover how animals use their senses in ways we humans can barely imagine. But it's not just the senses that are remarkable - it's the brains that process them. How does a swallow's tiny, one-gram brain take in the flood of visual information that enables the bird to whiz within inches of buildings while flying at 40 miles per hour? How does a dog's mind turn the sight of a hand signal into the happy anticipation of a treat? How has the evolution of the dog - from its wolf ancestors-reshaped its brain? Nova goes into the minds of animals to "see" the world in an entirely new way.

Upcoming Broadcasts:

  • KQED Plus: Sun, Sep 20, 2015 -- 11:00am Remind me
  • KQED Life: Fri, Sep 25, 2015 -- 7:00pm Remind me
  • KQED Life: Sat, Sep 26, 2015 -- 1:00am Remind me

Arctic Ghost Ship (#4216H) Duration: 56:46 STEREO TV14 (Secondary audio: DVI)

Unravel the greatest mystery in Arctic exploration: 160 years ago, the Franklin Expedition to chart the Northwest Passage vanished. Now, a Canadian team discovers one of Franklin's lost ships-a vital clue to the fate of the ill-starred expedition.

Upcoming Broadcasts:

  • KQED 9: Wed, Sep 23, 2015 -- 9:00pm Remind me
  • KQED 9: Thu, Sep 24, 2015 -- 3:00am Remind me
  • KQED World: Sat, Sep 26, 2015 -- 10:00pm Remind me
  • KQED World: Sun, Sep 27, 2015 -- 3:00pm Remind me
  • KQED Life: Mon, Sep 28, 2015 -- 8:00pm Remind me
  • KQED Life: Tue, Sep 29, 2015 -- 2:00am Remind me

Killer Typhoon (#4106H) Duration: 56:46 STEREO TVPG

It was the strongest cyclone to hit land in recorded history. On November 8, 2013, Typhoon Haiyan - what some are calling "the perfect storm" - slammed into the Philippines, whipping the low-lying and densely-populated islands with 200mph winds and sending a 2-story-high storm surge flooding into homes, schools, and hospitals. It wiped villages off the map and devastated cities, including the hard-hit provincial capital Tacloban. Estimates count more than 5000 dead and millions homeless.
What made Haiyan so destructive? In-depth interviews with the meteorologists charged with tracking and forecasting Pacific storms take us inside the anatomy of the typhoon, tracking its progress from its start as a low-pressure area over Micronesia to its deadly landfall and revealing why the Pacific is such fertile ground for cyclones. But that's just part of the story of why this storm was so deadly. With crews on the ground within days of the storm, Nova reveals how conditions dramatically deteriorated in the storm's aftermath, as impassable roads and shuttered gas stations paralyzed the critical relief effort, leaving lifesaving food, water, and medicine to pile up at the airport. Disaster preparedness experts and relief workers scramble to understand why the Philippines was so vulnerable when other countries,like India, have successfully slashed storm casualty counts in recent years. As climate change and sea level rise threaten millions of the world's most impoverished people with stronger, and perhaps more frequent, storms, how can we prepare for the next monster typhoon?

Upcoming Broadcasts:

  • KQED Life: Fri, Oct 2, 2015 -- 8:00pm Remind me
  • KQED Life: Sat, Oct 3, 2015 -- 2:00am Remind me

Secrets of Noah's Ark (#4212H) Duration: 56:46 STEREO TVPG

A 3700-year-old inscribed clay tablet reveals a surprising new version of the Biblical flood story, complete with how-to instructions for assembling an ark. Following the directions, expert boat builders assemble and launch a massive reed boat.

Upcoming Broadcasts:

  • KQED 9: Wed, Oct 7, 2015 -- 9:00pm Remind me
  • KQED 9: Thu, Oct 8, 2015 -- 3:00am Remind me
  • KQED World: Fri, Oct 9, 2015 -- 7:00am Remind me
  • KQED World: Fri, Oct 9, 2015 -- 1:00pm Remind me
  • KQED World: Sat, Oct 10, 2015 -- 10:00pm Remind me
  • KQED World: Sun, Oct 11, 2015 -- 3:00pm Remind me
  • KQED Life: Mon, Oct 12, 2015 -- 8:00pm Remind me
  • KQED Life: Tue, Oct 13, 2015 -- 2:00am Remind me

Petra - Lost City of Stone (#4205) Duration: 56:46 STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)

More than 2000 years ago, the thriving city of Petra rose up in the bone-dry desert of what is now Jordan. An oasis of culture and abundance, the city was built by wealthy merchants whose camel caravans transported incense and spices across hundreds of miles from the Arabian Gulf. They carved spectacular temple-tombs into its soaring cliffs, raised a monumental Great Temple at its heart, and devised an ingenious system that channeled water to vineyards, bathhouses, fountains, and pools. But following a catastrophic earthquake and a slump in its desert trade routes, Petra's unique culture faded and was lost to most of the world for nearly a thousand years.
Now, in a daring experiment, an archaeologist and sculptors team up to carve an iconic temple-tomb to find out how the ancient people of Petra built their city of stone. And beyond Petra's city of the dead, scientists using remote sensors and hydraulic flumes discover a city of the living-complete with a water system that not only supplied 30,000 people with enough to drink, but also filled bathhouses, fountains, and pools with such abundance that some scholars believe this desert metropolis may have been the Las Vegas of the ancient world. The race is on to discover how these nomads created this oasis of culture in one of the harshest climates on earth, and ultimately, why Petra disappeared.

Upcoming Broadcasts:

  • KQED Life: Mon, Oct 12, 2015 -- 9:00pm Remind me
  • KQED Life: Tue, Oct 13, 2015 -- 3:00am Remind me
  • KQED World: Fri, Oct 16, 2015 -- 7:00am Remind me
  • KQED World: Fri, Oct 16, 2015 -- 1:00pm Remind me

Cyberwar Threat (#4217H) Duration: 56:46 STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)

Through startling, previously unreported detail, delve into the chilling new reality of cyberwar, in which cyber weapons can inflict physical damage on our factories, power plants and pipelines - leaving us vulnerable to crippling attacks.

Upcoming Broadcasts:

  • KQED 9: Wed, Oct 14, 2015 -- 9:00pm Remind me
  • KQED 9: Thu, Oct 15, 2015 -- 3:00am Remind me
  • KQED World: Fri, Oct 16, 2015 -- 5:00am Remind me
  • KQED World: Fri, Oct 16, 2015 -- 11:00am Remind me
  • KQED World: Sat, Oct 17, 2015 -- 10:00pm Remind me
  • KQED World: Sun, Oct 18, 2015 -- 3:00pm Remind me
  • KQED Life: Mon, Oct 19, 2015 -- 8:00pm Remind me
  • KQED Life: Tue, Oct 20, 2015 -- 2:00am Remind me

Sinkholes - Buried Alive (#4203H) Duration: 56:46 STEREO TVPG

In Tampa, Florida, in February 2013, a giant hole in the ground opened up and swallowed half a house, killing 36 year-old Jeffrey Bush as he slept in his bedroom. A month later, a golfer in Illinois survived an 18-foot fall when the 14th hole caved in beneath his feet. Both were victims of sinkholes-a notorious worldwide hazard that lurks wherever limestone bedrock is found. When carbon dioxide dissolves in rainwater, it forms a weak acid that attacks the soft limestone, riddling it like Swiss cheese with hidden underground rivers, caves and hollows. While this process of erosion takes millions of years, the fragile roof of a cavern near the surface can collapse in an eye blink, with little or no advance warning. Sinkholes can range from a few meters across to one in Egypt that measures 50 x 75 miles, and a Chinese hole nearly half a mile deep. Filled with compelling eyewitness video of collapsing sinkholes and authoritative science from expert geologists, Nova investigates what it's like to have your world vanish beneath your feet.

Upcoming Broadcasts:

  • KQED 9: Wed, Oct 21, 2015 -- 9:00pm Remind me
  • KQED 9: Thu, Oct 22, 2015 -- 3:00am Remind me
  • KQED World: Fri, Oct 23, 2015 -- 5:00am Remind me
  • KQED World: Fri, Oct 23, 2015 -- 11:00am Remind me
  • KQED World: Sat, Oct 24, 2015 -- 10:00pm Remind me
  • KQED World: Sun, Oct 25, 2015 -- 3:00pm Remind me
  • KQED Life: Mon, Oct 26, 2015 -- 8:00pm Remind me
  • KQED Life: Tue, Oct 27, 2015 -- 2:00am Remind me

Animal Mummies (#4219H) Duration: 56:46 STEREO TVPG

From baboons to bulls, crocodiles to cows, a vast menagerie of animal mummies lies buried in Egyptian catacombs. Hi-tech imaging reveals what's inside the bundles and the strange role that animals played in ancient Egyptian beliefs.

Upcoming Broadcasts:

  • KQED 9: Wed, Oct 28, 2015 -- 9:00pm Remind me
  • KQED 9: Thu, Oct 29, 2015 -- 3:00am Remind me
  • KQED World: Fri, Oct 30, 2015 -- 5:00am Remind me
  • KQED World: Fri, Oct 30, 2015 -- 11:00am Remind me
  • KQED World: Sat, Oct 31, 2015 -- 10:00pm Remind me
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TV Technical Issues

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    TV Technical Issues
    • Comcast channel moves, Monterey/Salinas & Sacramento/Fairfield

      As of Tuesday 8/25, Comcast/Xfinity has moved four of KQED’s channels to new numbers in two of its service areas. The new info is: Monterey-Salinas: 371 – KQED World 372 – KQED Kids 373 – KQED Life 374 – KQED V-Me Sacramento, Fairfield, Rio Vista, Travis AFB and Vacaville: 390 – KQED World 391 – […]

    • Sutro Tower Annual Maintenance, week of 8/24 daytime

      (may affect Over the Air signal for KQED DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3) The Sutro Tower team will be doing their annual tower check and maintenance work this week, meaning that all stations may be switching back and forth from their main antenna to their auxiliary antenna between 9am and 4pm. Work should conclude no later than […]

    • Comcast/Xfinity Ch10 audio, Monday 7/20 evening

      UPDATE: Comcast was able to resolve their technical glitch apx 10:45pm * * * * * We are aware that at least during the early part of the evening of Monday 7/20, the audio is out of sync on Comcast/Xfinity channel 10, their basic cable service. This problem still exists as of 8:10pm. We have […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9, KQET

KQED 9 / KQET

Channels 9.1, 54.2, 25.1
XFINITY 9 and HD 709
Wave 9 and HD 164
DirecTV, Dish Network, AT&T U-verse: Channel # may vary, labeled as KQED, or as KQET in the 831 area code

All HD programs

KQED Plus, KQET

KQED Plus / KQET

Channels 54.1, 9.2, 25.2
XFINITY 10 and HD 710
Wave 10
DirecTV, Dish Network, AT&T U-verse: IF this channel provided to customer, channel # may vary, labeled as KQEH

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life

Channel 54.3
XFINITY 189
Wave 157

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World

Channel 9.3
XFINITY 190
Wave 156

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me

Channel 54.5 & 25.3
XFINITY 191 & 621
Wave 154

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids

Channel 54.4
XFINITY 192
Wave 155

Quality children's programming parents love too