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Upcoming Broadcasts:

Tedeschi Trucks Band (#403H) Duration: 56:05 STEREO TVPG

Filmed in Connecticut's historic Warner Theatre, Infinity Hall Live goes "On the Road" to bring you the rock and soul sounds of the Tedeschi Trucks Band. After many years on the road building separate, successful solo careers, Derek Trucks and Susan Tedeschi united to form a new band with an extended pool of collaborators and friends. The chemistry of the band is something to behold, complementing the masterful guitar playing of Trucks and the vocal prowess of Tedeschi this performance turns your living room into a soul stirring party. Listen to Tedeschi and Trucks talk about the experience of combining their musical talents and interests into a unique opportunity to bring their family on the road to deliver their blend of southern soul, American roots, authentic rock 'n' roll, and a touch of Florida swamp magic.

Upcoming Broadcasts:

  • KQED Plus: Thu, Dec 8, 2016 -- 11:00pm Remind me
  • KQED Plus: Fri, Dec 9, 2016 -- 5:00am Remind me

Buckwheat Zydeco (#110H) Duration: 57:07 STEREO TVPG

Emmy and Grammy Award-winning artist Buckwheat Zydeco and his band bring the Creole dance party to Infinity Hall. Born Stanley Joseph Dural, Jr. in 1947, Zydeco was raised in a large, musical family in Lafayette, Louisiana. "Growing up, the thing that made me happy was music," said Zydeco. "When you're listening to music or you're playing music, you got no business being sad." Zydeco's father played the accordion, but the young man originally refused to take up the instrument, dismissing the traditional zydeco music of his father's generation. He preferred playing the organ and listening to R&B. That changed in 1976, when he joined the "King of Zydeco" Clifton Chenier as a keyboard player. After learning to play the accordion, Zydeco formed his own band in 1979. For over three decades, Buckwheat Zydeco has been delighting audiences with his contemporary style of creole music. "It's based on the rhythm and blues. Whether you're playing an up-tempo song or a slow song, they always have that energy and that certain beat that go together with the music. It's always played with the washboard," says Zydeco, who plays the accordion, organ, and sings. Buckwheat Zydeco is an accomplished artist. He won an Emmy for his music in the television movie Pistol Pete: The Life And Times Of Pete Maravich and a Grammy for Best Zydeco Music Album in 2010 for Lay Your Burden Down. Zydeco also played at the closing ceremonies during the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta, Georgia, and performed at both inaugurations for President William Jefferson Clinton. His infectious music appeals to people of all ages. In 2010, Zydeco released his second children's album, Bayou Boogie. Zydeco keeps Louisiana tradition alive with his infectious music, encouraging the audience to boogie to the Buckwheat beat.

Upcoming Broadcasts:

  • KQED Life: Sat, Dec 10, 2016 -- 10:00pm Remind me
  • KQED Life: Sun, Dec 11, 2016 -- 4:00am Remind me

Jonathan Edwards (#111H) Duration: 57:11 STEREO TVPG

This program showcases veteran folk singer/songwriter Jonathan Edwards, best known for his 1971 classic "Sunshine." The song - a fierce proclamation of protest and independence set to deceptively upbeat music - became an anthem for numerous young people who opposed the Vietnam War. Today, Edwards seems more comfortable as a laid-back troubadour than a political radical. Often performing on stage barefoot (as he does at Infinity Hall), Edwards demonstrates an expertise with the guitar, mandolin, and accordion to create his own brand of acoustic folk-rock. His heart-felt lyrics and easy-going style continue to please his loyal fans as well as win over new ones. Edwards and his band - Moondi Klein on guitar, Charlie Rose on banjo, Tom Snow on piano and Joe Walsh on mandolin - perform songs primarily from his 2011 album, My Love Will Keep, such as the stunning a cappella rendition of "This Island Earth." But he doesn't disappoint his longtime fans and offers exuberant performances of the classics "Sunshine" and "Shanty," the latter which came to be known as a "Friday song" for many radio stations who would play it every Friday night at 5 to kick off the weekend. "I love playing rooms like this," Edwards says of Infinity Hall. "[It's like] we're playing in a big guitar ...or a Steinway grand piano. It feels like we're inside something like that and the music just vibrates and lives very much in a place like this."

Upcoming Broadcasts:

  • KQED Life: Sat, Dec 17, 2016 -- 10:00pm Remind me
  • KQED Life: Sun, Dec 18, 2016 -- 4:00am Remind me

Dawes (#112H) Duration: 55:38 STEREO TVPG

The venue is packed as Los Angeles-based band Dawes takes the stage. Although they could have filled an even larger venue, the intimate atmosphere at Infinity Hall is welcomed by guitarist and lead vocalist Taylor Goldsmith. "I'm pretty sure venues like this are exactly what our music is meant to be played in. No bigger, no smaller. This is exactly perfect," he told the audience after opening with "That Western Skyline" and "The Way You Laugh." With his brother Griffin Goldsmith on drums and vocals, Tay Strathairn on keyboards and vocals, and Wiley Gelber on bass, the foursome's carefully crafted rhythms and tight harmonies have been compared to the Laurel Canyon sound of Crosby, Still and Nash and Neil Young. Taylor commented on Dawes' chemistry both musically and personally. "We're all extremely close," says Taylor. "I don't think this would work if we weren't. A big part of our careers and our time spent playing music is on the road." The band puts an emphasis on its live sound, even turning to traditional methods when recording albums. Strathairn points out that the band records on two-inch tape, laying down an entire track at once rather than recording each part separately. "The performance becomes paramount. We're all in a room, and they say go, and you have to do a whole take of a whole song. We're a live band essentially, and I think that captures us a bit," he says. The group tours extensively and considers its live performances to be its greatest asset. "Music being what it is today, where the value of the record isn't what it was and people could take it for free if they want, the only way to carve out a career for yourself is playing on stage and playing shows and having people come out to the shows. It's always been the best way to spread the word about the band," says Taylor. True to his word, Taylor shows his appreciation for the audience by turning his microphone stand toward the singing crowd as they belt out the chorus line during an inspirational rendition of "When My Time Comes." Dawes closes the show with "Time Spent in Los Angeles," the song they played in June 2011 while performing on The Late Show with David Letterman.

Upcoming Broadcasts:

  • KQED Life: Sat, Dec 31, 2016 -- 10:00pm Remind me
  • KQED Life: Sun, Jan 1, 2017 -- 4:00am Remind me

Infinity Hall Live - Women of Song (#404H) Duration: 56:22 STEREO TVPG

Infinity Hall Live brings you some of the best female performances captured through our lens with songs from; Tori Amos, Aimee Mann, Shelby Lynne, The Wailin' Jenny's, Wilson Phillips and Joan Osborne. These women have brought us to our feet with their thought provoking lyrics, intense musicianship and emotional courage. Aimee Mann sings "Save Me" and "Wise Up" from the film Magnolia which earned her nominations for an Oscar, Golden Globe and three Grammys. Shelby Lynne shares the challenge of love and the pains of heartbreak on songs like "Killin' Kind" and "Your Lies". Tori Amos backed by a chamber ensemble dazzles with her poetic lyrics and intense piano playing on the playful "Leather" and haunting ballad "Winter". Relish the celestial harmonies of The Wailin' Jenny's with their gospel influenced version of "Bring Me Li'l Water Silvy" and join Joan Osborne as she begs the question "What if God was One of Us" from her number one hit of the same name.

Upcoming Broadcasts:

  • KQED Plus: Thu, Jan 5, 2017 -- 11:00pm Remind me
  • KQED Plus: Fri, Jan 6, 2017 -- 5:00am Remind me

Toad The Wet Sprocket (#405H) Duration: 55:49 STEREO TVPG

It's no surprise that Glen Phillips refers to this band of musical brothers as more of a family business than a rock band! Infinity Hall Live audiences will hear a collection of their favorite songs from the band's hit albums Fear and Dulcinea as well as exciting new tracks from their latest release, New Constellation. Never self-indulgent, TTWS charms the audience with the upbeat "Good Intensions", the galloping rhythm in "Windmills", a revelatory sadness in the new "California Wasted" and the nostalgic closer "Walk on the Ocean". Go behind the scenes and listen to Glen Phillips talk about the band's humble beginnings, the challenges of touring and what he hopes the fans take away from their music. With more than 25 years of writing and recording together, this concert proves that Toad the Wet Sprocket never fails to deliver the signature sound and pensive lyrics that solidified their position as one of the great indie rock bands of the 90's.

Upcoming Broadcasts:

  • KQED Plus: Thu, Jan 26, 2017 -- 11:00pm Remind me
  • KQED Plus: Fri, Jan 27, 2017 -- 5:00am Remind me
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TV Technical Issues

TV
    TV Technical Issues
    • early Thurs 12/08: planned KQED DT9s Over the Air outages

      (DT9.1 through 9.3) KQED will be performing maintenance at Sutro Tower in the overnight hours early Thursday 12/08. We are expecting a few power interruptions to take place and KQED will need to be off air for these. The outages are expected to be brief.

    • Wed 11/30: planned momentary outages of DT54 over the air signal

      (this is a continuation of the work originally announced for 11/28, which was not completed on Tuesday.) At some point during the morning of Wednesday Nov. 30th, the KQEH transmitter will switch from its main antenna to the auxillary one, to allow for the safety of workers doing maintenance for another TV station on the […]

    • Tues 11/29: DT54 Over the Air Signal restored

      Repairs have been completed on today’s transmitter issue, and the signals for DT54.1 through 54.5 have been restored.

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9, KQET

KQED 9 / KQET

Channels 9.1, 54.2, 25.1
XFINITY 9 and HD 709
Wave 9 and HD 164
DirecTV, Dish Network, AT&T U-verse: Channel # may vary, labeled as KQED, or as KQET in the 831 area code

All HD programs

KQED Plus, KQET

KQED Plus

Channels 54.1, 9.2, 25.2
XFINITY 10 and HD 710
Wave 10
DirecTV, Dish Network, AT&T U-verse: IF this channel provided to customer, channel # may vary, labeled as KQEH

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life

Channel 54.3
XFINITY 189
Wave 157

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World

Channel 9.3
XFINITY 190
Wave 156

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me

Channel 54.5 & 25.3
XFINITY 191 & 621
Wave 154

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids

Channel 54.4
XFINITY 192
Wave 155

Quality children's programming parents love too