Donate

Upcoming Broadcasts:

Rusted Root (#109H) Duration: 57:12 STEREO TVPG

The Pittsburgh-based fusion band Rusted Root brings their unique percussive jam-rock sound to the historic stage at Infinity Hall. With a highly unique sound, the band has cultivated a loyal following, selling more than 3 million albums worldwide. Originally formed in 1990, the band has been characterized as many things: a jam band, an eclectic collection, a college-radio wonder. Whatever the case, the band has been nothing but popular. With consistently sold-out tours, Rusted Root appears to be garnering the attention of more than just their loyal "Rootheads." Blending world influences from the African, Indian, and Middle Eastern traditions, Rusted Root embodies a percussion-driven rock band with heavy use of tight vocal harmony and pulsing chords. With hit songs like "Send Me on My Way" and "Dance in the Middle," Rusted Root has become an immovable facet in alternative rock.

Upcoming Broadcasts:

Buckwheat Zydeco (#110H) Duration: 57:07 STEREO TVPG

Emmy and Grammy Award-winning artist Buckwheat Zydeco and his band bring the Creole dance party to Infinity Hall. Born Stanley Joseph Dural, Jr. in 1947, Zydeco was raised in a large, musical family in Lafayette, Louisiana. "Growing up, the thing that made me happy was music," said Zydeco. "When you're listening to music or you're playing music, you got no business being sad." Zydeco's father played the accordion, but the young man originally refused to take up the instrument, dismissing the traditional zydeco music of his father's generation. He preferred playing the organ and listening to R&B. That changed in 1976, when he joined the "King of Zydeco" Clifton Chenier as a keyboard player. After learning to play the accordion, Zydeco formed his own band in 1979. For over three decades, Buckwheat Zydeco has been delighting audiences with his contemporary style of creole music. "It's based on the rhythm and blues. Whether you're playing an up-tempo song or a slow song, they always have that energy and that certain beat that go together with the music. It's always played with the washboard," says Zydeco, who plays the accordion, organ, and sings. Buckwheat Zydeco is an accomplished artist. He won an Emmy for his music in the television movie Pistol Pete: The Life And Times Of Pete Maravich and a Grammy for Best Zydeco Music Album in 2010 for Lay Your Burden Down. Zydeco also played at the closing ceremonies during the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta, Georgia, and performed at both inaugurations for President William Jefferson Clinton. His infectious music appeals to people of all ages. In 2010, Zydeco released his second children's album, Bayou Boogie. Zydeco keeps Louisiana tradition alive with his infectious music, encouraging the audience to boogie to the Buckwheat beat.

Upcoming Broadcasts:

Dawes (#112H) Duration: 55:38 STEREO TVPG

The venue is packed as Los Angeles-based band Dawes takes the stage. Although they could have filled an even larger venue, the intimate atmosphere at Infinity Hall is welcomed by guitarist and lead vocalist Taylor Goldsmith. "I'm pretty sure venues like this are exactly what our music is meant to be played in. No bigger, no smaller. This is exactly perfect," he told the audience after opening with "That Western Skyline" and "The Way You Laugh." With his brother Griffin Goldsmith on drums and vocals, Tay Strathairn on keyboards and vocals, and Wiley Gelber on bass, the foursome's carefully crafted rhythms and tight harmonies have been compared to the Laurel Canyon sound of Crosby, Still and Nash and Neil Young. Taylor commented on Dawes' chemistry both musically and personally. "We're all extremely close," says Taylor. "I don't think this would work if we weren't. A big part of our careers and our time spent playing music is on the road." The band puts an emphasis on its live sound, even turning to traditional methods when recording albums. Strathairn points out that the band records on two-inch tape, laying down an entire track at once rather than recording each part separately. "The performance becomes paramount. We're all in a room, and they say go, and you have to do a whole take of a whole song. We're a live band essentially, and I think that captures us a bit," he says. The group tours extensively and considers its live performances to be its greatest asset. "Music being what it is today, where the value of the record isn't what it was and people could take it for free if they want, the only way to carve out a career for yourself is playing on stage and playing shows and having people come out to the shows. It's always been the best way to spread the word about the band," says Taylor. True to his word, Taylor shows his appreciation for the audience by turning his microphone stand toward the singing crowd as they belt out the chorus line during an inspirational rendition of "When My Time Comes." Dawes closes the show with "Time Spent in Los Angeles," the song they played in June 2011 while performing on The Late Show with David Letterman.

Upcoming Broadcasts:

Become a KQED sponsor

TV Technical Issues

TV
    TV Technical Issues
    • Mon 11/03/14: Work on KQED Plus tower (DT54)

      Another station needs to do maintenance on its equipment on the tower on Monument Peak, requiring that we switch our DT54 Over the Air signal from the main antenna to the auxiliary when the work starts, then back to the main antenna at the conclusion. These switches should cause momentary outages only, and most receivers […]

    • Wed 10/15 morning: KQED Plus (KQEH) Over the Air signal down

      UPDATE: This problem has been resolved, and the OTA signal for the DT54 channels restored. (DT54.1 through 54.5) KQED Plus’ Over the Air transmission is currently off air via our KQEH transmitter on Monument Peak northeast of San Jose. Technicians are working on the problem. No current estimate regarding how long this will exist. We […]

    • KQET (DT25) Over the Air: Wed 8/27

      We are aware of the break-up issues for our DT25 Over the Air signal in the Monterey/Salinas area. This will also affect viewers of any cable or satellite signal provider using that transmitter as their source. Engineers are working on the problem.

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Channels 9.1, 54.2 & 25.1 - Monterey (KQET)
XFINITY 9 and HD 709

All widescreen and HD programs

KQED Plus

KQED +
Channels 54, 54.1, 9.2 & 25.2 - Monterey
XFINITY 10 and HD 2710

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life
Channel 54.3
XFINITY 189

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Channel 9.3
XFINITY 190

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Channel 54.5 & 25.3
XFINITY 191 & 621

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Channel 54.4
XFINITY 192

Quality children's programming parents love too