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Upcoming Broadcasts:

Last Train Home (#718) Duration: 1:26:46 STEREO (Secondary audio: none)

Every spring, China's cities are plunged into chaos, all at once, as a tidal wave of humanity attempts to return home by train. It is the Chinese New Year. The wave is made up of millions of migrant factory workers. The homes they seek are in the rural villages where they left behind family to seek work in the booming coastal cities. It is an epic spectacle that tells us much about China, a country discarding traditional ways as it hurtles towards modernity and global economic dominance.
This visually striking debut film from Chinese Canadian director Lixin Fan draws us into the fractured lives of a single migrant family caught up in this desperate annual migration. 16 years ago, the Zhangs abandoned their young children to find work in the city, consoled by the hope that their wages would lift their children into a better life. But in a bitterly ironic twist, the Zhangs's hopes for the future are undone by their very absence.
Qin, the child they left behind, has grown into adolescence crippled by a sense of abandonment. In an act of teenage rebellion, she drops out of school. She too will become a migrant worker. The decision is a heartbreaking blow for her parents.
In classic cinema verite style, this film follows the Zhangs's attempts to change their daughter's course and repair their ruptured family. Intimate and candid, it paints a human portrait of the dramatic changes sweeping China. We identify with the Zhangs as they navigate through the stark and difficult choices of a society caught between old ways and new realities. Can they get ahead and still undo some of the damage that has been done to their family?

Upcoming Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Sun, Feb 1, 2015 -- 11:00pm
  • KQED World: Mon, Feb 2, 2015 -- 7:00am

Education Education (#527) Duration: 56:46 STEREO

What does an education get you? In ancient times in China, education was the only way out of poverty, in recent times it has been the best way. China's economic boom and talk of the merits of hard work have created an expectation that to study is to escape poverty. But these days China's higher education system only leads to jobs for a few, educating a new generation to unemployment and despair.

Upcoming Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Mon, Feb 2, 2015 -- 1:00am
  • KQED World: Tue, Feb 3, 2015 -- 2:00am email reminder
  • KQED World: Tue, Feb 3, 2015 -- 8:00am email reminder

Poor Us: The Animated History of Poverty (#525) Duration: 53:34 STEREO

Do we know what poverty is? The poor may always have been with us, but attitudes towards them have changed. Beginning in the Neolithic Age, Ben Lewis's film takes us through the changing world of poverty. You go to sleep, you dream, you become poor through the ages. And when you awake, what can you say about poverty now? There are still very poor people, to be sure, but the new poverty has more to do with inequality?

Upcoming Broadcasts:

Stealing Africa (#524) Duration: 53:35 STEREO

How much profit is fair? Ruschlikon is a village in Switzerland with a very low tax rate and very wealthy residents. But it receives more tax revenue than it can use. This is largely thanks to one resident - Ivan Glasenberg, CEO of Glencore, whose copper mines in Zambia are not generating a large bounty tax revenue for the Zambians. Zambia has the 3rd largest copper reserves in the world, but 60% of the population live on less than $1 a day and 80% are unemployed. Based on original research into public documents, the film describes the tax system employed by multinational companies in Africa.

Upcoming Broadcasts:

Land Rush (#526) Duration: 56:46 STEREO

How do you feed the world? 75% of Mali's population are farmers, but rich, land-hungry nations like China and Saudi Arabia are leasing Mali's land in order to turn large areas into agribusiness farms. Many Malian peasants do not welcome these efforts, seeing them as yet another manifestation of imperialism. As Mali experiences a military coup, the developers are scared off ? but can Mali's farmers combat food shortages and escape poverty on their own terms?

Upcoming Broadcasts:

I Was Worth 50 Sheep (#514) Duration: 52:57 STEREO

Following a long practiced tradition in Afghanistan, 10-year-old Sabere was sold to a man in his fifties. For the next six years she was both slave and wife, miscarrying four times. Now at sixteen, she is fighting for her freedom.

Upcoming Broadcasts:

Chahinaz: What Rights for Women? (#518) Duration: 54:27 STEREO

Chahinaz, a 20-year-old student in Algeria, has mixed feelings about the Western world and its values, but she admires the freedom of Western women. Through her curiosity and voyage of self-discovery, Chahinaz begins to wonder what life is like for women in other Muslim countries and around the world and why things are slow to change in Algeria.

Upcoming Broadcasts:

Miss Nikki and the Tiger Girls (#701) Duration: 53:24 STEREO (Secondary audio: none)

This film mirrors the remarkable change that has taken place in Myanmar (Burma) since shooting began over two years ago. Through its exploration of 5 young women breaking free of tradition in their search for an original voice, it provides a powerful metaphor for a country suddenly thrust onto the world stage.

Upcoming Broadcasts:

My So-Called Enemy (#709) Duration: 1:26:32 STEREO (Secondary audio: none)

Spanning 7 years, this film follows 6 Palestinian and Israeli teenage girls committed to justice and mutual understanding after participating in a women's leadership program called Building Bridges for Peace. This heart and mind-opening film documents how the young women's transformative experience of knowing their "enemies" as human beings in the US meets with the realities of their lives back home in the Middle East. A film about building bridges of understanding in our own communities, it offers audiences profound messages about tolerance, inclusion and respect, conflict prevention and resolution - and the vital role of women in peacemaking.

Upcoming Broadcasts:

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TV Technical Issues

TV
    TV Technical Issues
    • KQED most channels, planned overnight maintenance: early Wed 1/14 midnight-3am

      (includes all DT9, DT54 and DT25 channels, along with most paid signal providers) We will be doing maintenance work in our Master Control area during the overnight hours of late Tues/early Wed 1/14. Work will begin shortly after midnight early Wednesday, and should be done in 2-3 hours, perhaps sooner. This will result in all […]

    • KQED all channels, planned overnight maintenance: early Fri 12/19 midnight-6am

      (this includes all DT9, DT54 and DT25 channels, along with all paid services) We will be doing upgrade and maintenance work in our Master Control area during the overnight hours of late Thurs/early Fri 12/19. Work will begin shortly after midnight early Friday, which may last until 6am, though we hope to finish earlier. This […]

    • KQED Plus OTA – Optimistically planned maintenance: Fri 12/05 mid-morning

      (DT54.1 thru 54.5) Assuming that the weather and road conditions permit, we plan to do a bit of maintenance on our KQEH transmitter the morning of Friday 12/05… hopefully 10am-11am-ish, but could be a bit later. Most of the work should not affect the outgoing signal, but there will need to be a cable swap […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Channels 9.1, 54.2 & 25.1 - Monterey (KQET)
XFINITY 9 and HD 709

All widescreen and HD programs

KQED Plus

KQED +
Channels 54, 54.1, 9.2 & 25.2 - Monterey
XFINITY 10 and HD 710

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life
Channel 54.3
XFINITY 189

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Channel 9.3
XFINITY 190

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Channel 54.5 & 25.3
XFINITY 191 & 621

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Channel 54.4
XFINITY 192

Quality children's programming parents love too