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Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly Previous Broadcasts

Episode #1634H

KQED World: Sun, Apr 28, 2013 -- 8:00 AM

CHILDREN'S MARCH 50TH ANNIVERSARY: In May 1963, hundreds of children - some as young as 6 years old - faced police dogs, fire hoses and arrest, to march against segregation in Birmingham, Alabama. Experts say it was a pivotal moment in the struggle for civil rights. Kim Lawton looks back at the march and its legacy and interviews civil rights leaders and some who marched as children, including University of Maryland, Baltimore County President Freeman Hrabowski, who was then 12 and who describes the personal impact of marching and being put in jail.
BASEBALL AS A ROAD TO GOD: Baseball has its own relics, prophets and rituals - as does religion - according to John Sexton, president of New York University and author of "Baseball as a Road to God." But beyond surface similarities, Sexton tells Bob Faw, the game's most magnificent moments, its timelessness and its intensity, can bring us to a sense of "the ineffable" - the transcendent.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Mon, Apr 29, 2013 -- 10:30 AM
  • KQED World: Mon, Apr 29, 2013 -- 4:30 AM

Episode #1633

KQED World: Sun, Apr 21, 2013 -- 8:00 AM

RELIGION AND THE ENVIRONMENT - A national organization called Interfaith Power and Light - IPL - is bringing different faiths together on environmental issues, especially climate change. Although pastors have often been reluctant to talk about the environment from the pulpit, Lucky Severson reports that IPL wants houses of worship to invest in energy efficiency and to serve as examples to the people in the pews, encouraging them to become energy efficient in their homes.
BASEBALL AS A ROAD TO GOD - Baseball has its own relics, prophets and rituals - as does religion - according to John Sexton, president of New York University and author of "Baseball as a Road to God." But beyond surface similarities, Sexton tells Bob Faw, the game's most magnificent moments, its timelessness and its intensity, can bring us to a sense of "the ineffable" - the transcendent.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Mon, Apr 22, 2013 -- 10:30 AM
  • KQED World: Mon, Apr 22, 2013 -- 4:30 AM

Episode #1632H

KQED World: Sun, Apr 14, 2013 -- 8:00 AM

CHURCHES AND DOMESTIC VIOLENCE - Women are overwhelmingly the victims of the widespread phenomenon of domestic violence. It's not frequently talked about in churches but a Chicago priest now visits parishes around the city to deliver a homily to open people's eyes to the problem and he encourages each parish to set up a support system for victims of abuse. He tells reporter Judy Valente that it's hard to measure success because no one knows how many women who need help aren't coming forward and that abusers don't change easily, but must be confronted and held accountable.
MEDICAL MINISTRY - Dr. Joseph Dutkowski, a devout Catholic, gave up his career as an engineer to become an orthopedic surgeon, specializing in patients - young and old - with afflictions that cripple or deform. Dutkowski tells Bob Faw that he sees the likeness of God in his patients, and that to share their suffering is, to him, a gift.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Mon, Apr 15, 2013 -- 10:30 AM
  • KQED World: Mon, Apr 15, 2013 -- 4:30 AM

Episode #1631

KQED World: Sun, Apr 7, 2013 -- 8:00 AM

INDIA SEX SELECTION - Recent attacks on women in India have spotlighted gender inequality there. In India, boy children have been preferred over girl children for centuries, in part because only boys can carry on the family's lineage, and also because the family must provide a dowry when their daughter gets married-even though dowries have been outlawed for half a century. As Fred de Sam Lazaro reports, the abortion of female fetuses has meant 5 boy babies are born to only 4 girl babies, but rising prosperity in India has led some families to view girls and boys as being of equal value.
KEEPING THE SABBATH - The fast pace of life and the many distractions created by technology have led a Presbyterian pastor in Virginia to experiment with taking one day a week with her family - without computers, work or even errands - a day for "holy time." As Judy Valente reports, the idea is, for at least one day a week, to stop producing more and more, and learn to be content and appreciate the gift of that day - the Sabbath.
JIM WALLIS - Bob Abernethy and Kim Lawton interview the social activist and CEO of Sojourners magazine about his new book On God's Side. Wallis advocates solving the country's major problems through a national Christian conversion that emphasizes serving "the common good."

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Mon, Apr 8, 2013 -- 10:30 AM
  • KQED World: Mon, Apr 8, 2013 -- 4:30 AM

Episode #1630

KQED World: Mon, Apr 1, 2013 -- 4:30 AM

SAME-SEX MARRIAGE - This past week the Supreme Court heard arguments on the constitutionality of California's Proposition 8 same-sex marriage restrictions and the Defense of Marriage Act. Religious groups filed briefs on both sides of the disputes. Tim O'Brien reports on the arguments and the justices' responses to the lawyers as they presented the cases.
NICK VUJICIC - Nick Vujicic is an evangelist and motivational speaker who, in the last 10 years, has traveled to 44 countries and spoken to 5 million people - despite having no arms or legs due to a rare disease he was born with. He has had to deal with his anger and sometimes depression, but he tells Lucky Severson "if God can do something beautiful with my broken pieces, then God truly has a plan for each and every one of us."
HOLY WEEK - The three days leading up to Easter comprise the holiest time of the year for Christians. Filled with worship, prayer and pilgrimages, they commemorate Jesus' crucifixion on Good Friday and resurrection on Easter. Father Kenneth Semon of The Church of the Holy Faith in Santa Fe, New Mexico says "To go through the experience of the three days is really to go through what changes life for people."

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Mon, Apr 1, 2013 -- 10:30 AM
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