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Nova Previous Broadcasts

Japan's Killer Quake (Episode #3810H)

KQED 9: Wed, Feb 27, 2013 -- 10:00 PM

In its worst crisis since World War II, Japan faces disaster on an epic scale: a rising death toll in the tens of thousands, massive destruction of homes and businesses, shortages of water and power, and the specter of nuclear reactor meltdowns. The facts and figures are astonishing. The March 11th earthquake was the world's fourth largest earthquake since record keeping began in 1900 and the worst ever to shake Japan. The seismic shock wave released over 4,000 times the energy of the largest nuclear test ever conducted; it shifted the earth's axis by 6 inches and shortened the day by a few millionths of a second. The tsunami slammed Japan's coast with 30 feet-high waves that traveled 6 miles inland, obliterating entire towns in a matter of minutes. This program combines authoritative on-the-spot reporting, personal stories of tragedy and survival, compelling eyewitness videos, explanatory graphics and exclusive helicopter footage for a unique look at the science behind the catastrophe.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Thu, Feb 28, 2013 -- 11:00 AM
  • KQED World: Thu, Feb 28, 2013 -- 5:00 AM
  • KQED 9: Thu, Feb 28, 2013 -- 4:00 AM

Rise of the Drones (Episode #4003H)

KQED Plus: Tue, Feb 26, 2013 -- 8:00 PM

A revolution is transforming the armed forces of every nation. Nova launches an investigation of the explosive growth of airborne UAVs or pilotless drones. During the invasion of Iraq in 2003, the US deployed only a handful; now, it has more than 7000. Besides the US, over 40 other nations are now building or buying these increasingly lethal and cost-effective weapons, and it's only a matter of time before a terrorist group turns the technology against Western targets. The latest Predators can track 12 targets at once, trace footprints back to their source and even recognize individual faces. Yesterday's soldiers and pilots put their lives on the line but today, a UAV pilot can "fly" a mission in Afghanistan remotely from a base in Nevada. As one pilot said, after carrying out a strike, "within 20 minutes you can be sitting at the dinner table talking to your kids." That new ability has already saved hundreds if not thousands of US service lives but may make military strikes a more tempting, seemingly risk-free option.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED Plus: Wed, Feb 27, 2013 -- 2:00 AM

Mind of a Rampage Killer (Episode #4008H)

KQED Life: Wed, Feb 20, 2013 -- 8:00 PM

What makes a person walk into a theater or a church or a classroom full of students and open fire? What combination of circumstances compels a human being to commit the most inhuman of crimes? Can science in any way help us understand these horrific events and provide clues as to how to prevent them in the future?
As the nation tries to understand the tragic events at Newtown, Miles O'Brien separates fact from fiction, investigating new theories that the most destructive rampage killers are driven most of all, not by the urge to kill, but the wish to die. Could suicide and the desire to go out in a media-fueled blaze of glory be the main motivation? How much can science tell us about a brain at risk for violence? Most importantly, can we recognize dangerous minds in time - and stop the next Newtown?

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Sat, Feb 23, 2013 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED Life: Sat, Feb 23, 2013 -- 2:00 AM
  • KQED Life: Fri, Feb 22, 2013 -- 8:00 PM
  • KQED World: Thu, Feb 21, 2013 -- 11:00 AM
  • KQED World: Thu, Feb 21, 2013 -- 5:00 AM
  • KQED 9: Thu, Feb 21, 2013 -- 3:00 AM
  • KQED Life: Thu, Feb 21, 2013 -- 2:00 AM
  • KQED 9: Wed, Feb 20, 2013 -- 9:00 PM

Who Killed Lindbergh's Baby? (Episode #4004)

KQED Plus: Tue, Feb 19, 2013 -- 8:00 PM

In the aftermath of his 1927 solo transatlantic flight, Charles Lindbergh became the most famous human being on earth. When he and his wife, Anne, had a son, Charlie, the press dubbed him Little Lindy. On March 1, 1932, kidnappers snatched Little Lindy from the family home near Hopewell, New Jersey. Negotiations stretched out for weeks, but Charlie never returned. His body was discovered not five miles from Hopewell. Now, Nova is reopening one of the most confounding crime mysteries of all time as a team of expert investigators employs state-of-the-art forensic and behavioral science techniques in an effort to determine what really happened to Lindbergh's baby - and why.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED Plus: Wed, Feb 20, 2013 -- 2:00 AM

Earth from Space (Episode #4006)

KQED 9: Wed, Feb 13, 2013 -- 9:00 PM

This film reveals a spectacular new space-based vision of our planet. Produced in extensive consultation with NASA scientists, NOVA takes data from earth-observing satellites and transforms it into dazzling visual sequences, each one exposing the intricate web of forces that sustains life on earth. Viewers witness how dust blown from the Sahara fertilizes the Amazon; how a vast submarine "waterfall" off Antarctica helps drive ocean currents around the world; and how the sun's heating up of the southern Atlantic gives birth to a colossally powerful hurricane. From the microscopic world of water molecules vaporizing over the ocean to the magnetic field that is bigger than Earth itself, this show reveals the astonishing beauty and complexity of our dynamic planet.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Sat, Feb 16, 2013 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED Life: Sat, Feb 16, 2013 -- 2:00 AM
  • KQED Life: Fri, Feb 15, 2013 -- 8:00 PM
  • KQED World: Thu, Feb 14, 2013 -- 11:00 AM
  • KQED World: Thu, Feb 14, 2013 -- 5:00 AM
  • KQED 9: Thu, Feb 14, 2013 -- 3:00 AM

Building Pharaoh's Chariot (Episode #4005H)

KQED 9: Wed, Feb 6, 2013 -- 9:00 PM

Around 3,600 years ago, reliefs in Egyptian tombs and temples depicted pharaohs and warriors proudly riding into battle on horse-drawn chariots. Some historians claim that the chariot launched a technological and strategic revolution, and was the secret weapon behind Egypt's greatest era of conquest known as the New Kingdom. But was the Egyptian chariot really a revolutionary design? How decisive a role did it play in the bloody battles of the ancient world? In this film, a team of archaeologists, engineers, woodworkers and horse trainers join forces to build and test two highly accurate replicas of Egyptian royal chariots. They discover astonishingly advanced features, including spoked wheels, springs, shock absorbers, anti-roll bars and even a convex shaped rear mirror, leading one of them to compare the level of design to the engineering standards of 1930's-era Buicks! By driving our pair of replicas to their limits in the desert outside Cairo, NOVA's experts test the claim that the chariot marks a crucial turning point in ancient military history.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Sat, Feb 9, 2013 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED Life: Fri, Feb 8, 2013 -- 2:00 AM
  • KQED Life: Thu, Feb 7, 2013 -- 8:00 PM
  • KQED World: Thu, Feb 7, 2013 -- 11:00 AM
  • KQED World: Thu, Feb 7, 2013 -- 5:00 AM
  • KQED 9: Thu, Feb 7, 2013 -- 3:00 AM

Building The Great Cathedrals (Episode #3711#)

KQED Plus: Tue, Feb 5, 2013 -- 8:00 PM

Carved from 100 million pounds of stone, soaring effortlessly atop a spiderweb of masonry, Gothic cathedrals are marvels of human achievement and artistry. But how did medieval builders reach such spectacular heights? Consuming the labor of entire towns, sometimes taking 100 years to build, these architectural marvels were crafted from just hand tools and stone. Many now teeter on the brink of catastrophic collapse. To save them, an international team of engineers, architects, art historians and computer scientists searches the naves, bays, and bell towers for clues to how the dream of these heavenly temples on earth came true. NOVA's teams perform hands-on experiments to investigate and reveal the architectural secrets that the cathedral builders used to erect their soaring, glass-filled walls. This program reveals the hidden formulas, drawn from the pages of the Bible itself, that drove medieval builders ever upward.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED Plus: Wed, Feb 6, 2013 -- 2:00 AM

Who Killed Lindbergh's Baby? (Episode #4004)

KQED Life: Fri, Feb 1, 2013 -- 2:00 AM

In the aftermath of his 1927 solo transatlantic flight, Charles Lindbergh became the most famous human being on earth. When he and his wife, Anne, had a son, Charlie, the press dubbed him Little Lindy. On March 1, 1932, kidnappers snatched Little Lindy from the family home near Hopewell, New Jersey. Negotiations stretched out for weeks, but Charlie never returned. His body was discovered not five miles from Hopewell. Now, Nova is reopening one of the most confounding crime mysteries of all time as a team of expert investigators employs state-of-the-art forensic and behavioral science techniques in an effort to determine what really happened to Lindbergh's baby - and why.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED Plus: Wed, Feb 20, 2013 -- 2:00 AM
  • KQED World: Sat, Feb 2, 2013 -- 10:00 PM
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TV Technical Issues

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    TV Technical Issues
    • KQED all channels, planned overnight maintenance: early Fri 12/19 midnight-6am

      (this includes all DT9, DT54 and DT25 channels, along with all paid services) We will be doing upgrade and maintenance work in our Master Control area during the overnight hours of late Thurs/early Fri 12/19. Work will begin shortly after midnight early Friday, which may last until 6am, though we hope to finish earlier. This […]

    • KQED Plus OTA ? Optimistically planned maintenance: Fri 12/05 mid-morning

      (DT54.1 thru 54.5) Assuming that the weather and road conditions permit, we plan to do a bit of maintenance on our KQEH transmitter the morning of Friday 12/05… hopefully 10am-11am-ish, but could be a bit later. Most of the work should not affect the outgoing signal, but there will need to be a cable swap […]

    • Mon 11/03/14: Work on KQED Plus tower (DT54)

      Another station needs to do maintenance on its equipment on the tower on Monument Peak, requiring that we switch our DT54 Over the Air signal from the main antenna to the auxiliary when the work starts, then back to the main antenna at the conclusion. These switches should cause momentary outages only, and most receivers […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

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