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Moyers & Company Previous Broadcasts

John Lewis Marches On (Episode #234H)

KQED Plus: Fri, Aug 30, 2013 -- 11:02 PM

On an encore rebroadcast of Moyers & Company (check local listings), Bill Moyers and Rep. John Lewis (D-GA) meet to share experiences and revelations about the momentous March on Washington, which they both attended 50 years ago. Moyers and Lewis share their experiences and revelations from the 60's civil rights era. Their discussion takes them to the spot in front of the Lincoln Memorial where Lewis, Martin Luther King, Jr., Bayard Rustin, Roy Wilkins, and others famously spoke about freedom and justice, creating critical momentum for both the Civil Rights Act and the Voting Rights Act. While there, Moyers and Lewis attracted a curious crowd of children and adults, and conducted a spontaneous lesson in civil rights history: http: //billmoyers.com/segment/john-lewis-steps-back-into-history/ Threading rarely-seen documentary footage into their conversation, Moyers ? who was deputy director of the newly-created Peace Corps at the time ? also shares his own memories of the day. He concludes with an essay about how the pursuit of equal rights and opportunities for all Americans ? championed at the March on Washington ? continues to be thwarted.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED Plus: Sat, Aug 31, 2013 -- 4:00 PM
  • KQED World: Sat, Aug 31, 2013 -- 12:00 PM
  • KQED World: Sat, Aug 31, 2013 -- 7:00 AM
  • KQED Plus: Sat, Aug 31, 2013 -- 5:02 AM

America's Gilded Capital (Episode #233H)

KQED Plus: Fri, Aug 23, 2013 -- 11:02 PM

Mark Leibovich covers Washington, DC, as chief national correspondent for The New York Times Magazine - and has written about the city's bipartisan lust for power, cash and notoriety in a book that everyone who's anyone in our nation's capital is talking about. The title is This Town, and if you want to know what the insiders of Washington are doing to the very notion of government of, by, and for the people, you have to read it, too. This is the story of how Washington became an occupied city, its hold on reality distorted by greed and ambition; it pulls no punches and names names, revealing the movers and shakers and the deals they make, all in the name of crony capitalism. This week, Mark Leibovich joins Bill to reveal what he has learned about a city where money rules and status is determined by who you know and what they can do for you.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED Plus: Mon, Aug 26, 2013 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Sun, Aug 25, 2013 -- 8:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Sun, Aug 25, 2013 -- 5:00 PM
  • KQED World: Sun, Aug 25, 2013 -- 3:30 PM
  • KQED World: Sun, Aug 25, 2013 -- 11:30 AM
  • KQED World: Sun, Aug 25, 2013 -- 3:00 AM
  • KQED Plus: Sat, Aug 24, 2013 -- 4:00 PM
  • KQED World: Sat, Aug 24, 2013 -- 12:00 PM
  • KQED World: Sat, Aug 24, 2013 -- 7:00 AM
  • KQED Plus: Sat, Aug 24, 2013 -- 5:02 AM

How People Power Generates Change (Episode #232H)

KQED Plus: Fri, Aug 16, 2013 -- 11:00 PM

With our democracy threatened by plutocrats and the politicians in their pockets more than ever, the antidote to organized money is organized people. It takes time and effort, but across the country, grass roots democracy is growing. Individuals are banding together, organizing toward common goals and demanding change - and often delivering it. On this encore broadcast, Bill sits with three organizers leading the way.
Marshall Ganz is a social movement legend who dropped out of Harvard to become a volunteer during Mississippi's Freedom Summer of 1964. He then joined forces with Cesar Chavez of the United Farmworkers, protecting workers who picked crops for pennies in California's fields and orchards. Ganz also had a pivotal role organizing students and volunteers for Barack Obama's historic 2008 presidential campaign. Now 70, he's still organizing across the United States and the Middle East, and back at Harvard, teaching students from around the world about what it takes to beat Goliath.
Later on the broadcast, economic equality advocates Rachel LaForest, executive director of Right to the City, and Madeline Janis, co-founder and national policy director of Los Angeles Alliance for a New Economy, discuss with Bill how social action can change both policy and lives. Janis led the fight for a living wage in Los Angeles; LaForest fights for fair and affordable housing across the country.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED Plus: Mon, Aug 19, 2013 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Sun, Aug 18, 2013 -- 8:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Sun, Aug 18, 2013 -- 5:00 PM
  • KQED World: Sun, Aug 18, 2013 -- 3:30 PM
  • KQED World: Sun, Aug 18, 2013 -- 11:30 AM
  • KQED World: Sun, Aug 18, 2013 -- 3:00 AM
  • KQED Plus: Sat, Aug 17, 2013 -- 4:00 PM
  • KQED World: Sat, Aug 17, 2013 -- 12:00 PM
  • KQED Plus: Sat, Aug 17, 2013 -- 5:00 AM

Taming Capitalism Run Wild (Episode #231H)

KQED World: Sat, Aug 10, 2013 -- 7:00 AM

* Modern American capitalism is a story of continued inequality and hardship. Even a modest increase in the minimum wage faces opposition from those who seem to show allegiance first and foremost to America's wealthy and powerful. Yet some aren't just wringing their hands about our economic crisis; they're fighting back.
In an encore broadcast, Economist Richard Wolff joins Bill to shine light on the disaster left behind in capitalism's wake, and to discuss the fight for economic justice, including a fair minimum wage. A Professor of Economics Emeritus at the University of Massachusetts, and currently Visiting Professor in the Graduate Program in International Affairs of the New School, Wolff has written many books on the effects of rampant capitalism, including Capitalism Hits the Fan: The Global Economic Meltdown and What to Do About It.
"We have this disparity getting wider and wider between those for whom capitalism continues to deliver the goods by all means, [and] a growing majority in this society facing harder and harder times," Wolff tells Bill. "And that's what provokes some of us to say it's a systemic problem."
* Also on the broadcast, activist and author Saru Jayaraman marches on Washington with restaurant workers struggling to make ends meet, and talks about how we can best support their right to a fair wage. Jayaraman is the co-founder and co-director of the Restaurant Opportunities Centers United, which works to improve pay and working conditions for America's 10 million-plus restaurant workers. She is also the author of Behind the Kitchen Door, an expose of the restaurant industry.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED Plus: Mon, Aug 12, 2013 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Sun, Aug 11, 2013 -- 8:00 PM
  • KQED World: Sun, Aug 11, 2013 -- 3:30 PM
  • KQED World: Sun, Aug 11, 2013 -- 11:30 AM
  • KQED World: Sun, Aug 11, 2013 -- 3:00 AM
  • KQED World: Sat, Aug 10, 2013 -- 12:00 PM

The Faces of America's Hungry (Episode #230H)

KQED World: Sat, Aug 3, 2013 -- 12:00 PM

Here in the richest country on earth, 50 million of us - 1 in 6 Americans - go hungry. More than a third of them are children. Debates on how to address hunger - in both Congress and the media - are filled with tired cliches about freeloaders undeserving of government help, living large at the expense of honest, hardworking taxpayers. But the documentary "A Place at the Table" paints a truer picture of America's poor.
On an encore broadcast Kristi Jacobson, one of the film's directors and producers, and Mariana Chilton, director of the Center for Hunger-Free Communities, join Bill to break these stereotypes apart and share how hunger hits hard at people from every walk of life. "The cost of food insecurity, obesity and malnutrition is way larger than it is to feed kids nutritious food," Jacobson tells Bill. "There's no opportunity for people who are low-income to really engage in our democracy," says Chilton. "I think they're actively shut out."

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED Plus: Mon, Aug 5, 2013 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Sun, Aug 4, 2013 -- 8:00 PM
  • KQED World: Sun, Aug 4, 2013 -- 3:30 PM
  • KQED World: Sun, Aug 4, 2013 -- 11:30 AM
  • KQED World: Sun, Aug 4, 2013 -- 3:00 AM

John Lewis Marches On (Episode #229H)

KQED Plus: Fri, Aug 2, 2013 -- 11:00 PM

This week, two icons of the 60's civil rights era - Bill Moyers and Rep. John Lewis (D-GA) - meet to share experiences and revelations about the momentous March on Washington which they both attended 50 years ago.
Their discussion takes them to the spot in front of the Lincoln Memorial where Lewis, Martin Luther King, Jr., Bayard Rustin, Roy Wilkins, and others famously spoke about freedom and justice, creating critical momentum for both the Civil Rights Act and the Voting Rights Act. While there, Moyers and Lewis attract the attention of schoolchildren, and conduct a spontaneous living history lesson.
The March on Washington is largely remembered for King's "I Have a Dream" speech. The 23-year-old Lewis, newly named to lead the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, was the youngest of the featured speakers, but among the most defiant.
Now a 14-term congressman from Georgia, Lewis shares new insight into how the event unfolded - including last-minute conflicts over his own manuscript. He also discusses the continuing challenges to racial and economic equality, and his unwavering dedication to nonviolence and brotherly love as a means toward a more just end - even when facing inevitable violence and brutality.
"To look out and see the best of America convinced me more than anything else that this is the product, this is the work of the movement," Lewis tells Moyers. "Sometimes you have to not just dream about what could be - you get out and push and you pull and you preach. And you create a climate and environment to get those in high places, to get men and women of good will in power to act."
Threading rarely-seen documentary footage into their conversation, Moyers - who was deputy director of the newly-created Peace Corps at the time - also shares his own memories of the day. He concludes with an essay about how the pursuit of equal rights and opportunities for all Americans - so championed at the March on Washington - continues to be thwarted.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED Plus: Sat, Aug 3, 2013 -- 5:00 AM
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