Donate

Moyers & Company Previous Broadcasts

The Resurrection of Ralph Reed (Episode #134H)

KQED Plus: Fri, Aug 31, 2012 -- 11:00 PM

* While Romney, Ryan, Christie, and Rubio get the lion's share of attention during the Republican Convention this week, 3 one-time college Republicans who are now the party's real power-brokers - Karl Rove, Ralph Reed, and Grover Norquist - are busy doing what they do best: leveraging their political, religious, and financial resources to back pro-corporate, anti-government objectives at the core of the conservative agenda.
The true surprise at the Tampa convention is Ralph Reed's resurrection. When the former head of the Christian Coalition was discovered to have raked in millions of dollars from the super lobbyist - and eventually convicted felon - Jack Abramoff, Reed wound up in political purgatory. But outraged by the election of Barack Obama, and responding to what he describes as God's call (via Sean Hannity), Reed returned to start the Faith and Freedom Coalition with the aim of toppling Barack Obama from the White House. To succeed, Reed needs to win the allegiance of many of the trusting Christian followers he had duped and double-crossed while working with Abramoff. Can he pull it off? That's the story this week.
*Later on the show, Bill also talks with Mike Lofgren, a long-time Republican who says the rise of politicized religious fundamentalism transformed his party and created a de facto religious test for the presidency. Lofgren tells the story in his book The Party is Over: How Republicans Went Crazy, Democrats Became Useless, and the Middle Class Got Shafted.

Nuns, Faith, and Politics (Episode #133H)

KQED World: Sat, Aug 25, 2012 -- 7:30 AM

Weeks before Republican Paul Ryan was selected to run for vice president, Sister Simone Campbell - who heads Network, a Catholic policy and lobbying group - hit the road to protest the so-called "Ryan budget" recently passed by the House of Representatives. She and some of her sister nuns rolled across the heartland on a bus trip designed to arouse public concern over what the Ryan plan would mean for social services in America, especially its slashing of programs for the poor. Sister Simone says his budget is inconsistent with Catholic social teaching. The US Conference of Catholic Bishops agrees.
But other Catholics say Sister Simone and the nuns have crossed the line, becoming too outspoken and political. Robert Royal, editor in chief of The Catholic Thing and founder of the Faith & Reason Institute, believes that issues of economic inequality are being oversimplified. Royal says the focus should be on creating a more dynamic economy for all.
It's one of the hottest issues of this overheated summer. Watch our field report from producers who rode along on the "Nuns on the Bus" tour, then join a passionate, candid discussion with Sister Simone and Royal.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED Plus: Wed, Aug 29, 2012 -- 1:00 AM
  • KQED Plus: Tue, Aug 28, 2012 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED World: Mon, Aug 27, 2012 -- 10:00 AM
  • KQED World: Mon, Aug 27, 2012 -- 7:00 AM
  • KQED World: Mon, Aug 27, 2012 -- 2:00 AM
  • KQED Plus: Mon, Aug 27, 2012 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Sun, Aug 26, 2012 -- 8:00 PM
  • KQED World: Sun, Aug 26, 2012 -- 3:30 PM
  • KQED World: Sun, Aug 26, 2012 -- 11:30 AM
  • KQED World: Sun, Aug 26, 2012 -- 7:30 AM
  • KQED World: Sat, Aug 25, 2012 -- 12:00 PM

Confronting The Contradictions of America's Past (Episode #132H)

KQED World: Sat, Aug 18, 2012 -- 7:30 AM

Learning from our racial past is crucial to addressing America's current ethnic tensions, but only if we confront key historical contradictions. In an encore broadcast, Khalil Muhammad helps bring these issues to light. Muhammad heads the New York Public Library's Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, and is the author of The Condemnation of Blackness, which connects American histories of race, crime and the making of urban America to modern headlines.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Mon, Aug 20, 2012 -- 10:00 AM
  • KQED World: Mon, Aug 20, 2012 -- 7:00 AM
  • KQED World: Mon, Aug 20, 2012 -- 2:00 AM
  • KQED Plus: Mon, Aug 20, 2012 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Sun, Aug 19, 2012 -- 8:00 PM
  • KQED World: Sun, Aug 19, 2012 -- 3:30 PM
  • KQED World: Sun, Aug 19, 2012 -- 11:30 AM
  • KQED World: Sun, Aug 19, 2012 -- 7:30 AM
  • KQED World: Sat, Aug 18, 2012 -- 12:00 PM

Between Two Worlds: Life on the Border (Episode #131H)

KQED Plus: Fri, Aug 10, 2012 -- 11:00 PM

No writer understands the border culture between Mexico and the US more intimately than Luis Alberto Urrea, this week's guest on an encore broadcast. His own life is the stuff of great novels. Son of a Mexican father and Anglo mother, Urrea grew up first in Tijuana and then just across the border in San Diego. Over the years he has produced a series of acclaimed novels, including The Hummingbird's Daughter, The Devil's Highway, and his latest, Queen of America - each a rich and revealing account of the people of the borderlands that join and separate our two nations.
Earlier this year, a number of books were removed from Tucson, Arizona classrooms when the Tucson school district eliminated a Mexican-American studies program on the accusation it was "divisive." The program included references to Urrea's work. Urrea talks with Bill about that episode as he unfolds the modern reality of life on the border.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Mon, Aug 13, 2012 -- 10:00 AM
  • KQED World: Mon, Aug 13, 2012 -- 7:00 AM
  • KQED World: Mon, Aug 13, 2012 -- 2:00 AM
  • KQED Plus: Mon, Aug 13, 2012 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Sun, Aug 12, 2012 -- 8:00 PM
  • KQED World: Sun, Aug 12, 2012 -- 3:30 PM
  • KQED World: Sun, Aug 12, 2012 -- 11:30 AM
  • KQED World: Sun, Aug 12, 2012 -- 7:30 AM
  • KQED World: Sat, Aug 11, 2012 -- 12:00 PM
  • KQED World: Sat, Aug 11, 2012 -- 7:30 AM
  • KQED Plus: Sat, Aug 11, 2012 -- 5:00 AM

Suppressing The Vote (Episode #130H)

KQED Plus: Fri, Aug 3, 2012 -- 11:00 PM

* The fight against voter fraud is a solution in search of a problem - documented instances of voter fraud these days are surprisingly few. Nevertheless, since the 2010 midterm elections, new election laws passed by Republican-dominated legislatures in 14 states have sought to limit voter registration or require photo IDs in order to vote - identification that for many is too expensive or otherwise difficult to obtain. Such laws, according to a recent report from the Brennan Center for Justice "will make it harder for hundreds of thousands of poor Americans to vote." That's why some say the real goal isn't about fighting voter fraud; it's about enabling voter suppression. < br />This week, Bill talks to Keesha Gaskins, an attorney and co-author of that report, and Michael Waldman, president of the Brennan Center for Justice, about modern efforts to keep minorities and the poor in particular from exercising one of the most fundamental American rights. "When these votes come under attack by this level of partisan gamesmanship, it's completely inappropriate and antithetical to our history," Gaskins tells Bill. "This is a very real political issue, but beyond that, this is a real issue of real Americans being able to access and be self-determinative in how we're governed."
* Also on the program, Bill talks with Anthony Baxter, director of You've Been Trumped!, an upcoming documentary about Donald Trump's aggressive efforts to build "the greatest golf course in the world" along ancient sand dunes on the coast of Scotland. A veteran journalist, Baxter says what Trump and even local media are hailing an economic boon is actually a disaster threatening the environment and callously disrupting peoples' lives - a perfect example of capitalism run amuck, and how the rest of us pay the price. "It seems to me there's one rule for the super-rich and one rule for everybody else," Baxter says. "And the 99% of people in the world are tired and fed up of having money and power riding roughshod over their lives and our planet. Our planet, I don't think, can afford these kinds of decisions."

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED Plus: Wed, Aug 8, 2012 -- 1:00 AM
  • KQED Plus: Tue, Aug 7, 2012 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED World: Mon, Aug 6, 2012 -- 10:00 AM
  • KQED World: Mon, Aug 6, 2012 -- 7:00 AM
  • KQED World: Mon, Aug 6, 2012 -- 2:00 AM
  • KQED Plus: Mon, Aug 6, 2012 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Sun, Aug 5, 2012 -- 8:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Sun, Aug 5, 2012 -- 5:00 PM
  • KQED World: Sun, Aug 5, 2012 -- 3:30 PM
  • KQED World: Sun, Aug 5, 2012 -- 11:30 AM
  • KQED World: Sun, Aug 5, 2012 -- 7:30 AM
  • KQED Plus: Sat, Aug 4, 2012 -- 4:00 PM
  • KQED World: Sat, Aug 4, 2012 -- 12:00 PM
  • KQED World: Sat, Aug 4, 2012 -- 7:30 AM
  • KQED Plus: Sat, Aug 4, 2012 -- 5:00 AM

What It's Like to Go to War (Episode #129H)

KQED Plus: Wed, Aug 1, 2012 -- 1:00 AM

America has been at war for over a decade now, with millions of soldiers having seen death and dying up close in Afghanistan and Iraq. But most Americans, watching comfortably on their TVs and computers, witness mostly to statistics, stump speeches, and "expert" rhetoric, don't get what's really going on there.
This week, Bill talks to Karl Marlantes - a highly-decorated Vietnam veteran, Rhodes Scholar, author, and PTSD survivor - about what we on the insulated outside need to understand about the minds and hearts of our modern warriors. Marlantes shares intimate stories about how his battlefield experiences both shaped him and nearly destroyed him, even after returning to civilian life.
"'Thou shalt not kill' is a tenet you just do not violate, and so all your young life, that's drilled into your head," Marlantes tells Bill. "And then suddenly, you're 18 or 19 and they're saying, 'Go get 'em and kill for your country.' And then you come back and it's like, 'Well, thou shalt not kill' again. Believe me, that's a difficult thing to deal with. You take a young man and put him in the role of God, where he is asked to take a life - that's something no 19-year-old is able to handle."

Become a KQED sponsor

TV Technical Issues

TV
    TV
    • KQED TV All Channels: Planned outage late Fri/early Sat 1/14 midnight-2am

      All KQED television channels will be off the air late Friday/early Saturday 1/14 beginning at midnight for approximately two hours to perform maintenance and upgrades to our electrical system. These improvements will help KQED maintain and continue our broadcast service to the community. We will return to our regularly scheduled programs as soon as work […]

    • Wed 12/28: KQET DT25 Over the Air signal restored

      UPDATE: signal was restored apx 6pm (DT25.1 through 25.3) We are aware that our transmitter servicing the Watsonville/Monterey/Salinas area, KQET, is off the air. Engineers are on their way from San Francisco to check it out. Estimated time for repairs not yet known.

    • Planned KQET (DT25) outage: early Sun 12/18 apx 1am

      (DT25.1 through 25.3) Due to maintenance and software update work being done by one of the paid signal providers, KQET-25 will need to go off the air for apx 15-30 minutes at apx 1am.

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9, KQET

KQED 9 / KQET

Channels 9.1, 54.2, 25.1
XFINITY 9 and HD 709
Wave, DirecTV, Dish Network, AT&T U-verse: Channel # may vary, labeled as KQED, or as KQET in the 831 area code.
Outstanding PBS programming, KQED original productions, and more.

All HD programs

KQED Plus, KQET

KQED Plus / KQEH

Channels 54.1, 9.2, 25.2
XFINITY 10 and HD 710
Wave, DirecTV, Dish Network, AT&T U-verse: Channel # may vary, labeled as KQEH
KQED Plus, formerly KTEH.
Unique programs including the best British dramas, mysteries, and comedies.

PBS Kids

PBS Kids

(starts Jan 16, 2017)
Channel
54.4, 25.3
XFINITY 192
Wave: Channel # may vary.
Quality children's programming. Live streaming 24/7 at pbskids.org.

KQED Life

KQED Life

Channel 54.3
XFINITY 189
Wave: Channel # may vary.
Best of arts, food, gardening, how-to, and travel.

KQED World

KQED World

Channel 9.3, 54.5
XFINITY 190
Wave: Channel # may vary.
Best of non-fiction programs including public affairs, local and world events, nature, history, and science.