Donate

This American Land Previous Broadcasts

Seamount of Life. Arctic Traffic, Altamaha River Pollution, Diatoms and Climate Change (Episode #404)

KQED World: Sat, Aug 23, 2014 -- 8:30 AM

Using special recording technology to document the spawning of endangered fish like the Nassau grouper, scientists in the Caribbean study spawning aggregation sites that are critically important for the survival of many ocean species. We follow them to one of these sites off the western coast of Puerto Rico that has been severely impacted by overfishing; conservationists say an effectively enforced marine protected area is urgently needed there. Climate change is causing a rapid loss of summer sea ice in the Arctic Ocean, opening the region to more shipping traffic, oil exploration and other industrial activities that were never possible before. This is creating growing risks to whales, walruses, seals and seabirds - especially in the narrow migration corridor in the Bering Strait. The traffic also poses new risks to the region's local native people who hunt and fish in small boats. Conservationists are pressing for new measures to protect the marine environment, wildlife and welfare of local residents in the changing Arctic. The Altamaha River in southern Georgia is a major waterway, still undammed, flowing in its natural state more than a hundred miles to the Atlantic and its spectacular estuary. But there's a large pulp mill on the river that has been operating for decades, and critics say it has been discharging pollution into the river which they allege the pulp company refuses to clean up, and which the state of Georgia has been slow to address. We go to the river to see for ourselves. In another story on the warming Arctic, we meet researchers in Greenland who gather samples of fossilized microscopic algae in lake sediments, discovering vital clues about past and current climate change in the region.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Sun, Aug 24, 2014 -- 9:30 AM

Wilderness Anniversary, Arkansas Oil Pipeline, Climbing Fish (Episode #403)

KQED World: Sat, Aug 16, 2014 -- 8:30 AM

Marking the fiftieth anniversary of the Wilderness Act, we explore its origins and success in protecting more than 100 million acres of unspoiled natural wilderness, a distinctly American achievement. There are still many more areas of wild nature that deserve protection, and the Wilderness Act remains an essential law in the cause of conservation. In March, 2013, a rupture in a buried oil pipeline surprised suburban homeowners in Mayflower, Arkansas by flooding their streets with crude oil. Many of them didn't even know there was a pipeline under their yards. To find out more about this event, we offer a two-part investigative story co-produced with Inside Climate News, a Pulitzer Prize-winning reporting unit. Researchers study a type of Goby fish in Hawaii that climbs up steep waterfalls to reach its freshwater spawning areas, an amazing story of adaptation and evolution over time.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Sun, Aug 17, 2014 -- 9:30 AM

Owyhee Canyonlands, Sustainable Alaskan Village, Algae Power, Fungi Fuel (Episode #402)

KQED World: Sat, Aug 9, 2014 -- 8:30 AM

Much of Oregon is a desert; and in the dry, remote southeastern corner of the state there's a wild and captivating canyon landscape carved by the Owyhee River. It's been described as the largest intact, unprotected stretch of the American West, but it needs more protection from development pressure, including mining. A robust campaign for wilderness designation is making progress. We travel to a remote Alaskan village, Igiugig, where young native Alaskans are adopting new technologies and green ethics to build a healthy, sustainable future while keeping true to their traditions. With another report on emerging biofuels, we learn about new advances in converting algae into a wide range of useful products, including oil, growing the algae with by-products from corn ethanol distilleries. We meet a scientist in Montana who searches the globe for botanical specimens, discovering fungi and bacteria in the tissues of some plants that can be converted into a diesel-like fuel.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Sun, Aug 10, 2014 -- 9:30 AM

Forage Fish, Wild Olympics, Biofuel from Cornfield Residue, Fire Ants (Episode #401)

KQED World: Sat, Aug 2, 2014 -- 8:30 AM

Researchers on the Oregon coast study the role that forage fish play in the food chain. Sometimes called "bait fish", sardines, anchovies, smelt and other small fish are vitally important in sustaining larger species - including sea birds, salmon, and marine mammals like sea lions. Humans also catch forage fish, mainly for animal feed, and there's growing concern that large-scale commercial harvesting of forage fish comes at the expense of other marine life, potentially with catastrophic results. Spectacular Olympic National Park is the centerpiece of the verdant Olympic Peninsula in northwest Washington State, right up against the Canadian border. There's now a bill in Congress that would add more protection to the forests and watersheds around the park, and we explore why there's wide support for the proposal among the people living there. In another report on emerging second-generation biofuels, we travel to Iowa where farmers are discovering there's growing demand for the residue in their cornfields - stalks, leaves, husks and cobs - left on the ground after the corn is harvested, That residue, called "corn stover", is biomass that can also be converted into ethanol. Everybody wants to eradicate biting, invasive fire ants, but scientists say they can learn a great deal by studying the social structure of these insects. New research shows that the widespread success of fire ants has been assisted when humans disturb natural areas with roads and development.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Sun, Aug 3, 2014 -- 9:30 AM
Become a KQED sponsor

TV Technical Issues

TV
    TV Technical Issues
    • KQET Off Air Sun 8/03 morning

      (DT25.1, 25.2, 25.3) KQET DT25 was off the air for a portion of Sunday morning, due to the transmitter taking a power hit. The signal has been restored. Most receivers should have re-acquired our signal once it returned, but a few Over the Air viewers may need to do a rescan in order to restore […]

    • KQED DT9s Over the Air: beginning Wed 7/09

      (DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3) The PSIP Info part of our Over the Air (OTA) signal for KQED DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3 dropped out of our overall signal early Wednesday 7/09. Once PSIP was restored most OTA receivers moved our signal back to the correct channel locations. However, for some viewers, it appears as if they have lost […]

    • KQED FM 88.1 translator off air Tues 6/03

      The Martinez translator for KQED-FM will be off the air all day Tuesday June 3rd. We are rebuilding the 25 year old site with all new antennas and cabling. This should only affect people listening on 88.1MHz in the Martinez/Benicia area.

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Comcast 9 and 709
Digital 9.1, 54.2 or 25.1

All widescreen and HD programs

KQED Plus

Channel 54
Comcast 10 and 710
Digital 9.2, 54.1 or 25.2

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life
Comcast 189
Digital 54.3

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Comcast 190
Digital 9.3

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Comcast 191 & 621
Digital 54.5 or 25.3

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Comcast 192
Digital 54.4

Quality children's programming parents love too