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PBS NewsHour Previous Broadcasts

Episode #11059

KQED 9: Fri, Sep 19, 2014 -- 3:00 PM

IRAN - ZARIF - Although Secretary of State John Kerry has said there is a role for Iran in the Obama administration's plan to combat the Islamic State militants, Iranian foreign minister Mohammad Javad Zarif is critical of the American strategy. In an interview with chief foreign affairs correspondent Margaret Warner he explains why Tehran has ruled out working with Washington to defeat the extremist group.
SCOTLAND - A record-breaking 85% of registered voters turned out at the polls in Scotland yesterday to cast their ballots for or against independence. The majority of residents, 55%, voted for the nation to remain a part of the United Kingdom. Judy Woodruff analyzes the referendum and its outcome with Louise Richardson, principal and vice-chancellor at the University of St. Andrews, and the Economist's David Rennie.
ALIBABA IPO - The Chinese e-commerce giant, Alibaba began trading on the New York Stock Exchange today, and has taken Wall Street by storm. Hari Sreenivasan debriefs with technology journalist David Kirkpatrick.
UTAH - EXTREME SPORTS - In Utah, some extreme sports enthusiasts are pushing the bounds of how to appreciate nature. Jeffrey Brown has the story.
BROOKS & DIONNE - The New York Times' David Brooks and the Washington Post's E.J. Dionne analyze this week's top stories.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Sat, Sep 20, 2014 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Fri, Sep 19, 2014 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED World: Fri, Sep 19, 2014 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED Channel 9: Fri, Sep 19, 2014 -- 6:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Fri, Sep 19, 2014 -- 6:00 PM
  • KQED World: Fri, Sep 19, 2014 -- 4:00 PM
  • KQED Channel 9: Fri, Sep 19, 2014 -- 3:00 PM

Episode #11058

KQED 9: Thu, Sep 18, 2014 -- 3:00 PM

ISLAMIC STATE - AUSTRALIA
Australian police thwarted a plot by alleged supporters of the Islamic State militant group to behead a member of the public. Judy Woodruff debriefs with Stuart Cohen, a Sydney based journalist who has been covering the story.
ISLAMIC STATE - REGIONAL VIEWS
How do people in the Middle East view the Islamic State group, and the efforts led by the United States to stop the extremist organization? Hari Sreenivasan explores this question with Nader Hashemi, director of the Center for Middle East Studies at Denver University, Marwan Muasher, the former foreign minister and former deputy primer minister of Jordan, who is now vice president for studies at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, and Robin Wright, a senior fellow at the Wilson Center.
UKRAINE - Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko spoke before both the House and the Senate this morning. He made it clear that he is counting on more US support to regain control of Eastern Ukraine. Chief foreign affairs correspondent Margaret Warner has our report.
UTAH LAND USE - In Utah, local authorities are battling federal powers over control of a prized Native American archaeological site. Jeffrey Brown examines how this dispute has come to stand for a much larger fight as part of his ongoing series, "Culture at Risk."
COMMUNITY POLICE - The Department of Justice announced a new initiative today to help build relationships between communities and their police departments. Gwen Ifill discusses the initiative with Tracie Keesee, co-founder of the UCLA Center for Policing Equity, and Ronald Hampton, a former community relations officer with the Metropolitan Police Department in Washington, DC.
CENSUS - ECONOMY - The US Census Bureau has released a lot of new data this week on income, poverty and economic growth. While the country's median household income is still below where it was prior to the Great Recession, the official poverty rate has fallen slightly and child poverty dropped the most that it has in a single year since the 1960s. Judy Woodruff has the story.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Fri, Sep 19, 2014 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Thu, Sep 18, 2014 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED World: Thu, Sep 18, 2014 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED Channel 9: Thu, Sep 18, 2014 -- 6:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Thu, Sep 18, 2014 -- 6:00 PM
  • KQED World: Thu, Sep 18, 2014 -- 4:00 PM
  • KQED Channel 9: Thu, Sep 18, 2014 -- 3:00 PM

Episode #11057

KQED 9: Wed, Sep 17, 2014 -- 3:00 PM

FIGHTING THE ISLAMIC STATE - President Obama has stressed that airstrikes will be the primary strategy for an expanded US military role in the fight against the Islamic State militants. Secretary of State John Kerry says ground troops will come from moderate Syrian rebels and the Iraqi military. Can the Obama administration's plan for combating the Islamic State group succeed without putting US ground forces in harms way? Gwen Ifill explores this question with Janine Davidson, senior fellow for defense policy at the Council on Foreign Relations, and Derek Harvey, a retired Army Colonel who is now the director of research and strategy for the Global Initiative on Civil Society and Conflict at the University of South Florida.
NFL - The NFL is once again under scrutiny as the Minnesota Vikings have barred running back Adrian Peterson from playing for the team while he deals with charges of child abuse. Hari Sreenivasan has the story.
SCOTLAND VOTE - In a crucial referendum tomorrow, voters in Scotland will decide whether their country will remain a part of the United Kingdom or become an independent nation. Scottish citizens tell us how they will be voting and why.
GOLDEN RICE - In the Philippines, genetically modified rice could save lives by providing crucial nutrients to malnourished individuals with vitamin A deficiency. However, the crop has raised concerns among activists who are against genetically modified organisms, or GMOs. Science correspondent Miles O'Brien reports on this high stakes controversy.
KEN BURNS/THE ROOSEVELTS - In his latest documentary, filmmaker Ken Burns tells the story of the Roosevelt family and their pivotal role in shaping American politics. Margaret Warner sits down with Burns to discuss the film.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Thu, Sep 18, 2014 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Wed, Sep 17, 2014 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED World: Wed, Sep 17, 2014 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED Channel 9: Wed, Sep 17, 2014 -- 6:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Wed, Sep 17, 2014 -- 6:00 PM
  • KQED World: Wed, Sep 17, 2014 -- 4:00 PM
  • KQED Channel 9: Wed, Sep 17, 2014 -- 3:00 PM

Episode #11056

KQED 9: Tue, Sep 16, 2014 -- 3:00 PM

EBOLA - President Obama has pledged to ramp up US response to the Ebola outbreak in West Africa. Judy Woodruff analyzes the president's plan with Laurie Garrett, senior fellow for global health at the Council on Foreign Relations and Lawrence Gostin, director of the O'Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law at Georgetown University. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports from Lagos, where he is on assignment.
ISLAMIC STATE SENATE HEARING - Army General Martin Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, says he will not rule out the possibility of US combat troops on the ground to fight against the Islamic State militant group. PBS NewsHour Capitol Hill producer Quinn Bowman has the story.
REFUGEE CRISIS - The ongoing turmoil in the Middle East, and especially in Syria, has created the worst refugee crisis in decades. Judy Woodruff discusses the situation with Michel Gabaudan, president of Refugees International.
IOWA SENATE RACE - In just 7 weeks voters will cast their ballots in this year's midterm elections. Last weekend, Judy Woodruff traveled to Iowa, the site of one of the closest contests in the nation.
BUILDING BETTER TEACHER - A new poll finds that the majority of Americans believe that teacher preparation should be more rigorous. Jeffrey Brown speaks with Elizabeth Green, author of the book "Building a Better Teacher," which explores what can be done to improve the quality of teaching. < br>MALALA YOUSAFZAI - Malala Yousafzai, the 17-year-old Pakistani activist who was shot by the Taliban for advocating girls' education, has become an international figure and an inspiration to children and adults alike. On a recent visit to New York, she sat down with Hari Sreenivasan to answer questions submitted by PBS NewsHour Student Reporting Labs participants.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Wed, Sep 17, 2014 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Tue, Sep 16, 2014 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED World: Tue, Sep 16, 2014 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED Channel 9: Tue, Sep 16, 2014 -- 6:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Tue, Sep 16, 2014 -- 6:00 PM
  • KQED World: Tue, Sep 16, 2014 -- 4:00 PM
  • KQED Channel 9: Tue, Sep 16, 2014 -- 3:00 PM

Episode #11055

KQED 9: Mon, Sep 15, 2014 -- 3:00 PM

ISLAMIC STATE - Following president Obama's call last week for a broad coalition of nations to help combat the Islamic State militants in Iraq and Syria, more than two dozen European and Arab countries convened in Paris today, pledging to fight the extremist group. Gwen Ifill debriefs with Derek Harvey, a retired Army Colonel who is now the director of research and strategy for the Global Initiative on Civil Society and Conflict at the University of South Florida, and Steven Simon, a senior fellow at the Middle East Institute.
NET NEUTRALITY - Earlier this year the Federal Communications Commission proposed allowing the creation of faster and slower traffic lanes on the web, allowing companies to charge more for faster delivery. The public has been weighing in on the debate over what is called "net neutrality." Hari Sreenivasan examines the issue with tech reporter David Pogue.
SCOTLAND - Voters in Scotland will decide in a referendum Thursday whether they remain a part of the United Kingdom or become an independent nation. Jeffrey Brown takes a closer look at what is motivating both "yes" and "no" voters, and what is at stake.
PRE-DIABETES - A recent study found that the risk for breast, liver and pancreatic cancers, among others, is 15 percent greater in individuals with prediabetes. Gwen Ifill explores the findings and their implications with David Nathan, director of the Diabetes Center at Massachusetts General Hospital.
XEROX - In an effort that began over two decades ago, Xerox has changed its approach to corporate diversity. Economics correspondent Paul Solomon has the story as part of his on-going reporting on "Making Sen$e" of financial news.
STUDENT REPORTING LAB - An urban school district in California is implementing an ambitious plan to transform their lunch program to provide healthier, locally sourced food. This report comes from Jake Schoneker and his student journalists at Media Enterprise Alliance, part of the NewsHour's Student Reporting Lab Network that trains young people in public media journalism.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Tue, Sep 16, 2014 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Mon, Sep 15, 2014 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED World: Mon, Sep 15, 2014 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Mon, Sep 15, 2014 -- 6:00 PM
  • KQED World: Mon, Sep 15, 2014 -- 4:00 PM

Episode #11054

KQED 9: Fri, Sep 12, 2014 -- 3:00 PM

BILL CLINTON/AMERICORPS - President Obama and former president Bill Clinton marked the 20th anniversary of AmeriCorps at the White House today. Judy Woodruff sits down with Clinton to discuss the legacy of the program, and to hear his take on Obama's strategy to combat the Islamic State militant group.
AIR BAGS - GM has repeatedly made headlines for its massive recalls, but now other big car manufacturers, including Honda, have had to recall cars due to safety concerns over exploding air bags. Jeffrey Brown explores the scale of the problem with David Shepardson of the Detroit News.
OUTPATIENT SURGICAL CENTERS - In the wake of the death of comedian Joan Rivers, who suffered from complications during surgery performed at an outpatient medical center, many are questioning the rising use of such facilities. Hari Sreenivasan debriefs with Shannon Pettypiece, who has been covering the story for Bloomberg News.
CHINA/SMITHFIELD - One year ago, a Chinese firm bought America's largest Pork Producer, Smithfield Foods Inc., in the largest Chinese acquisition of a U.S. company to date. Nathan Halverson from the Center for Investigative Reporting examines the role the Chinese government played in the takeover.
SHIELDS & BROOKS - Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and the New York Times' David Brooks analyze this week's top stories.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Sat, Sep 13, 2014 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Fri, Sep 12, 2014 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED World: Fri, Sep 12, 2014 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Fri, Sep 12, 2014 -- 6:00 PM
  • KQED World: Fri, Sep 12, 2014 -- 4:00 PM

Episode #11053

KQED 9: Thu, Sep 11, 2014 -- 3:00 PM

OBAMA'S SPEECH PART I - In his address to the nation last night, President Obama called for a comprehensive strategy to degrade and contain the Islamic State militant group. Gwen Ifill debriefs with White House National Security Advisor Susan Rice, and the House Armed Services Committee chairman Buck McKeon.
OBAMA'S SPEECH PART II - Judy Woodruff discusses the strategy Obama outlined in his speech with Stephen Hadley, former National Security Advisor during the George W. Bush administration, Richard Haass, former director of policy planning at the US Department of State, and current president of the Council on Foreign Relations, Michele Flournoy, former Under Secretary of Defense for Policy during the first term of the Obama administration, and current chief executive officer at the Center for a New American Security, and Andrew Bacevich, a retired Army Colonel and professor of international relations at Boston University.
NFL - The NFL has appointed former FBI director Robert Mueller to conduct an investigation into how the league handled the evidence in the Ray Rice domestic abuse case. Hari Sreenivasan analyzes the latest developments with Kavitha Davidson, who writes about sports for Bloomberg View.
9/11 MISSING PAGES - In the 13 years since the 9/11 attacks, not every question about that day has been answered. Pressure continues to mount to declassify pages of the 9/11 investigation that spell out Saudi Arabia's ties to the al-Qaeda hijackers. Jeffrey Brown explores why the pages remain classified with Lawrence Wright, who wrote a story on this topic in this week's New Yorker magazine.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Fri, Sep 12, 2014 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Thu, Sep 11, 2014 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED World: Thu, Sep 11, 2014 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Thu, Sep 11, 2014 -- 6:00 PM
  • KQED World: Thu, Sep 11, 2014 -- 4:00 PM

Episode #11052

KQED 9: Wed, Sep 10, 2014 -- 3:00 PM

PRESIDENT OBAMA'S SPEECH - President Obama will address the nation tonight to outline his plan to confront the Islamic State militant group. Gwen Ifill debriefs with PBS NewsHour political editor Domenico Montanaro and chief foreign affairs correspondent Margaret Warner. (Note: the 6pm broadcast on KQED 9 will include the speech itself.)
RESPIRATORY VIRUS - Children across the country have fallen ill with a rare and potentially severe respiratory illness. Jeffrey Brown explores what is behind the mystery virus and its rapid spread.
MENTAL HEALTH - Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports on efforts to bridge the gap between science and spirituality to treat mental illness in India as part of our "Agents for Change" series.
GAME ON - The video game Minecraft has attracted millions of players. Now Microsoft is in talks to buy the company behind the game for over two billion dollars. Hari Sreenivasan has the story.
FOLEY POET - Poet Daniel Johnson recalls the life and legacy of his close friend, journalist James Foley, who was beheaded by the Islamic State militant group in August.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Thu, Sep 11, 2014 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Wed, Sep 10, 2014 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED World: Wed, Sep 10, 2014 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Wed, Sep 10, 2014 -- 6:00 PM
  • KQED World: Wed, Sep 10, 2014 -- 4:00 PM

Episode #11051

KQED 9: Tue, Sep 9, 2014 -- 3:00 PM

PREVIEW OF THE PRESIDENT'S SPEECH - President Obama will address the nation at 6pm Pacific on Wednesday night to outline plans to combat the Islamic State militant group. Ahead of this speech, the president met today with congressional leaders from both parties. Gwen Ifill sits down with Democratic Senator Tim Kaine of Virginia, and Republican Senator James Inhofe of Oklahoma to discuss the president's upcoming address.
EBOLA - As the US increases aid to treat and contain the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, the situation on the ground continues to unravel. Judy Woodruff debriefs with Nancy Lindborg, the USAID assistant administrator for the Bureau for Democracy, Conflict and Humanitarian Assistance.
GREAT LAKES ALGAE BLOOM - A toxic algal bloom in Lake Erie left residents of Toledo, Ohio without drinking water for several days this summer. Experts believe the algal bloom was caused by fertilizer runoff from farms throughout the Great Lakes Basin. Christy McDonald of Detroit Public Television reports on how drones might be able to prevent fertilizer runoff and save farmers money.
DOMESTIC VIOLENCE - Yesterday the Baltimore Ravens terminated running back Ray Rice's contract after a new video emerged of him punching his then-fiancee, Janay Palmer, last February. The national conversation on domestic violence has heated up as Palmer, who is now Rice's wife, has come out in support of the disgraced athlete. Judy Woodruff explores why victims of domestic violence stay in abusive relationships with Esta Soler, founder and president of Futures Without Violence, a nonprofit that works to end the physical abuse of women and children.
PAY PHONES - Apple unveiled a new way for consumers to replace their wallets with their phones today. The company also introduced its first piece of wearable technology, the Apple Watch. Gwen Ifill analyzes whether Apple can remain an innovator in the era after Steve Jobs with John Simons, media and technology editor for the Associated Press.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Wed, Sep 10, 2014 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Tue, Sep 9, 2014 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED World: Tue, Sep 9, 2014 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Tue, Sep 9, 2014 -- 6:00 PM
  • KQED World: Tue, Sep 9, 2014 -- 4:00 PM

Episode #11050

KQED 9: Mon, Sep 8, 2014 -- 3:00 PM

ISLAMIC STATE GROUP - The US and its allies are preparing to enter a new phase in the campaign to dismantle the Islamic State militant group in Iraq and Syria. President Obama plans to present the full strategy to the nation in a speech on Wednesday. Judy Woodruff has our report.
IMMIGRATION - President Obama has faced criticism from both sides of the aisle for his decision to delay action on immigration reform until after midterm elections. Jeffrey Brown examines Obama's decision and its impact with Amy Walter, national editor of the Cook Political Report, and Roberto Suto, director of the Tomas Rivera Policy Institute at the University of Southern California.
COLORADO FRACKING - Disputes over fracking for oil and gas are fueling deep political divides in Colorado, where communities are engaged in a battle with the state to gain more control over oil and gas drilling. Rocky Mountain PBS's Dan Boyce has the story.
SPORTS - A celebrated NFL player and an NBA team owner have both made inglorious exits from the world of professional sports. Judy Woodruff discusses these developments with Christine Brennan, a sports journalist and columnist for USA Today, and Kevin Blackistone, a sports journalist and commentator for ESPN.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Tue, Sep 9, 2014 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Mon, Sep 8, 2014 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED World: Mon, Sep 8, 2014 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Mon, Sep 8, 2014 -- 6:00 PM
  • KQED World: Mon, Sep 8, 2014 -- 4:00 PM

Episode #11049

KQED 9: Fri, Sep 5, 2014 -- 3:00 PM

NATO - Ukrainian president Petro Poroshenko announced a cease-fire agreement outside of the NATO summit in Wales today. Today marked the close of the two-day summit, which was dominated by talks of the crisis in Ukraine and the Islamic State militant group. Jeffrey Brown discusses the summit with Nicholas Burns, a former US ambassador to NATO who is now a professor at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government, Michael McFaul, a former US ambassador to Russia who is now a professor at Stanford University, and John Mearsheimer, a professor of political science at the University of Chicago.
JOBS REPORT - The latest jobs report came in below expectations despite economists' predictions of a solid month of hiring in August. Economics correspondent Paul Solman has the story as part of his on-going reporting on "Making Sen$e" of financial news.
SHIELDS &BROOKS - Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and the New York Times' David Brooks analyze this week's top stories.
GUNS & POETRY - In a tragic accident, a 9-year-old girl shot and killed her instructor at a gun range last week. This shocking event raised questions about how people, especially children, cope with fatal accidents. Poet Gregory Orr reflects on this in a poem he wrote about accidentally killing his own brother in a gun accident at the age of 12.
JOAN RIVERS - Comedian Joan Rivers died yesterday at a hospital in New York at the age of 81. Judy Woodruff explores the life and legacy of one of the pioneers for women in comedy.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Sat, Sep 6, 2014 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Fri, Sep 5, 2014 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED World: Fri, Sep 5, 2014 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Fri, Sep 5, 2014 -- 6:00 PM
  • KQED World: Fri, Sep 5, 2014 -- 4:00 PM

Episode #11048

KQED 9: Thu, Sep 4, 2014 -- 3:00 PM

FERGUSON OR TERROR - The Department of Justice will launch a civil rights investigation into the practices of the police department in Ferguson, Missouri, following the fatal shooting of unarmed black teenager Michael Brown by white police officer Darren Wilson. Judy Woodruff explores how the investigation may play out with Robert Driscoll, a partner at the law firm Friedlander Misler in Washington, DC, and Tracie Keesee, co-founder of the Center for Policing Equity.
ADMISSIONS - Goucher College has announced a new admissions option that eliminates traditional admissions requirements such as test scores and transcripts, and asks instead that students create a two-minute video explaining why they would thrive at the school. Jeffrey Brown discusses this new option with Goucher College president Jose Antonio Bowen.
MCDONNELL VERDICT - Former Virginia Governor Bob McDonnell was found guilty on 11 corruption-related charges today. His wife, Maureen McDonnell, was found guilty on nine charges. Judy Woodruff has the story.
KANSAS SENATE RACE - Democratic candidate Chad Taylor abruptly announced his withdrawal from the Kansas Senate race late yesterday, leaving Independent candidate Greg Orman to face off against Republican incumbent Pat Roberts. Judy Woodruff analyzes this development with Jonathan Martin, the New York Times' national political correspondent.
ALGAE - The algae bloom that turned part of Lake Erie toxic has brought a new level of attention to environmental troubles in the Great Lakes. Christy McDonald of Detroit Public Television speaks to scientists about the latest thinking on the underlying causes, and what's changing with the environment now.
NFL - As the pro-football season kicks off, the NFL is introducing several new rules aimed at preventing head injuries. Jeffery Brown examines the changes with DeMaurice Smith, executive director of the NFL Players Association, and Dr. Matthew Matava who is team physician for the St. Louis Rams and a member of the NFL Physicians Society, but does not speak for the NFL itself.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Fri, Sep 5, 2014 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Thu, Sep 4, 2014 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED World: Thu, Sep 4, 2014 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Thu, Sep 4, 2014 -- 6:00 PM
  • KQED World: Thu, Sep 4, 2014 -- 4:00 PM

Episode #11047

KQED 9: Wed, Sep 3, 2014 -- 3:00 PM

UKRAINE - NATO - Ukrainian president Petro Poroshenko announced this morning that a cease-fire agreement had been reached with Russian president Vladimir Putin. Moscow denied this, saying Russia is not party to the conflict in Ukraine. A revised statement from Kiev spoke only of steps that could lead to a cease-fire, but pro-Russian separatists rejected this as well. Speaking on a visit to Mongolia, Putin outlined his own proposal to end the conflict. All this comes as NATO leaders prepare to meet at a summit in Wales where the crisis in Ukraine is likely to be one of the items at the top of the agenda. Chief foreign affairs correspondent Margaret Warner shares her analysis.
US FOREIGN POLICY - WHAT CAN AMERICA DO? - How has the Obama administration responded to the multiple crises arising around the globe, and what else can, and should, be done? Judy Woodruff leads the discussion with Eric Edelman of the Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments, Vali Nasr, dean of the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies, and David Ignatius, a foreign affairs columnist for the Washington Post.
MOON SHOOT - One Florida community has developed a unique program for teaching children to read, with remarkable results. Special correspondent John Tulenko of Learning Matters has our report.
ANONYMOUS - As incidents of hacking and cyber attacks continue to surface, one online community known as "anonymous" has captured some of the biggest headlines for their hacks. Hari Sreenivasan examines the group and its origins.
IMMIGRATION - Communities across the US have been impacted by an influx of unaccompanied migrant children crossing the border. In an ongoing series of conversations, we capture a variety of perspectives on this issue. Jeffrey Brown has our latest conversation with a sheriff from Massachusetts who says his county has been affected.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Thu, Sep 4, 2014 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Wed, Sep 3, 2014 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED World: Wed, Sep 3, 2014 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Wed, Sep 3, 2014 -- 6:00 PM
  • KQED World: Wed, Sep 3, 2014 -- 4:00 PM

Episode #11046

KQED 9: Tue, Sep 2, 2014 -- 3:00 PM

ISLAMIC STATE- A video released today by the Islamic State militant group claims to show the beheading of American journalist Steven Sotloff. Sotloff appeared briefly in the August 19 video showing the beheading of another American journalist, James Foley. In that video, Foley's killer threatened that Sotloff would suffer the same fate if US air strikes continued in Iraq. Today's video threatened the life of a third hostage, British aid worker David Cawthorne Haines. Judy Woodruff debriefs with Charles Sennott, co-founder of GlobalPost. She then discusses the horrific killing with Douglas Ollivant, a senior national security fellow with the New America Foundation, Anne-Marie Slaughter, president and CEO of the New America Foundation, and Daniel Benjamin, director of the John Sloan Dickey Center for International Understanding at Dartmouth University.
EBOLA - Public health officials have voiced concern over the growing Ebola outbreak in West Africa. They say that it could destabilize countries in the region, and warn that the window is closing to keep it contained. Jeffrey Brown examines the outbreak and its potential impact with Dr. Tom Frieden, the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, who has just returned from West Africa.
PRIVACY HACK - The theft of celebrities' personal photos, which were posted online without their consent Sunday, have raised questions over just how secure personal information is online. Judy Woodruff has the story.
CHINA ORPHANS - As part of his "Agents for Change" series, NewsHour correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports on one woman's efforts to change the way orphans are cared for in China.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Wed, Sep 3, 2014 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Tue, Sep 2, 2014 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED World: Tue, Sep 2, 2014 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Tue, Sep 2, 2014 -- 6:00 PM
  • KQED World: Tue, Sep 2, 2014 -- 4:00 PM

Episode #11045

KQED 9: Mon, Sep 1, 2014 -- 3:00 PM

UKRAINE UPDATE - Russia, Ukraine and Ukrainian rebels gathered in Belarus today to begin new rounds of talks aimed at restoring peace in Ukraine. Judy Woodruff gets an update on the latest developments with Fred Weir, Moscow correspondent for The Christian Science Monitor.
PART-TIME WORKERS - The current job market has seen a sharp increase in the number of part-time workers, in part because workers are now seeking flexibility in their hours and employers are looking to control labor costs. NewsHour economics correspondent Paul Solman looks at some of the consequences as part of his ongoing reporting series, "Making Sen$e."
BREAKTHROUGH SCHOOLS - Special correspondent Terry Rubin reports from Minnesota, where an innovative summer school program is aimed at motivating its students to apply for college.
PAKISTAN - The wave of political unrest continued in Pakistan today as anti-government protesters clashed with police and stormed the local state TV building, forcing the channel briefly off the air. Judy Woodruff discusses the issue with Husain Haqqani, former Pakistan ambassador to the US and Moeed Yusuf, director of South Asia programs at the US Institute for Peace.
FOOTBALL - Jeffery Brown sits down with Mark Edmundson, author of "Why Football Matters: My Education in the Game," to find out what makes football such an integral part of American culture.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Tue, Sep 2, 2014 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Mon, Sep 1, 2014 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED World: Mon, Sep 1, 2014 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Mon, Sep 1, 2014 -- 6:00 PM
  • KQED World: Mon, Sep 1, 2014 -- 4:00 PM
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TV Technical Issues

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    TV Technical Issues
    • KQET (DT25) Over the Air: Wed 8/27

      We are aware of the break-up issues for our DT25 Over the Air signal in the Monterey/Salinas area. This will also affect viewers of any cable or satellite signal provider using that transmitter as their source. Engineers are working on the problem.

    • Week of 8/25: Sutro Tower work (including KQED 9 Over the Air)

      (Affects several San Francisco TV & Radio stations, including KQED 9.1, 9.2 & 9.3) During the week of August 25, Monday through Friday, between 9am and 4pm, several TV and radio stations will be switching to their Auxiliary antennas. This is being done so that the tower crew can perform routine maintenance on the regular […]

    • KQET Off Air Sun 8/03 morning

      (DT25.1, 25.2, 25.3) KQET DT25 was off the air for a portion of Sunday morning, due to the transmitter taking a power hit. The signal has been restored. Most receivers should have re-acquired our signal once it returned, but a few Over the Air viewers may need to do a rescan in order to restore […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

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