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PBS NewsHour Previous Broadcasts

Episode #11234

KQED 9: Fri, May 22, 2015 -- 3:00 PM

LISTENING IN - The White House is urging the Senate to agree to a House-passed bill to renew anti-terrorism programs due to expire on June 1. Judy Woodruff talks to Mike DeBonis to see if the NSA will stop their continuous surveillance on American lives.
DEFINING MARRIAGE - Ireland can become the first country to adopt same-sex marriage by a popular vote. Hari Sreenivasan discuses with Padraic Halpin of Reuters, to see what this means for Ireland and other countries following suit.
SENIOR IN NEED - It's estimated that millions of seniors in America suffer with food insecurity. Sarah Varney reports how some elderly people are struggling to keep healthy meals on the table.
SHIELDS AND GERSON - Syndicated columnist Mark Shield and Washington Post's Michael Gerson analyze the week's top political stories, including advances made by the Islamic State, passage of the Patriot Act bill and the release of Hillary Clinton's emails.
HOMELESS TRANSGENDER KIDS - Homelessness is a critical issue for transgender people; 1 in 5 transgender individuals have experienced cases of homelessness at some point in their lives. Hari Sreenivasan reports on the handful of programs that are helping transgender youth.
CLASS OF 2015 - The caps are off! Commencement season 2015 is in full swing and while thousands of new graduates will start their next journey, many got a chance to get some last minute advice from famous figures. Judy Woodruff highlights some of the most inspiring -- and funniest -- commencement speeches of this year.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED 9: Fri, May 22, 2015 -- 6:00 PM
  • KQED World: Fri, May 22, 2015 -- 4:00 PM

Episode #11233

KQED 9: Thu, May 21, 2015 -- 3:00 PM

REGION IN CRISIS - After at least 100 Syrian soldiers died in an overnight fight, it seems the Islamic State group has taken full control of Palmyra, Syria. Gwen Ifill will talk to David Ignatius and Feisal Istrabadi about the fall of the city and the continuous rise of this terrorist group.
BIENVENIDOS - It has been more than 50 years since the U.S. has had relations with Cuba, and it seems the two countries are getting closer than ever to reaching a reconciliation. Judy Woodruff will talk to Margaret Warner and Jeffery Brown, who is in Havana, to discuss what has been done so far and what it will take to reach a full an agreement.
UNDER THE DOME - President Barack Obama's new Asian trade deal seems to clear another hurdle. Gwen Ifill will speak with NewsHour's Political Director, Lisa Desjardins about what this deal means going forward. < br>FISH VS. NUTS - Farmers in California are preparing for state-ordered cuts in water use to take effect this week. But there are already battles over who's using too much water. Economics correspondent Paul Solman looks at what you might call an "Omega-3 food fight" among producers of well-known healthy foods.
OUT OF BOUNDS - A New Jersey judge dismissed all charges against NFL running back, Ray Rice. Rice, a free-agent, who was charged for domestic violence against his now-wife, Janay, says he's ready to move on. Hari Sreenivasan talks to Christine Brennan about the case and what is in store for the running back.
NATURES'S TREAT - Yosemite National Park is 125. Despite the age, it still remains one of the most popular and beautiful parks in the nation. Jeffery Brown explores the fascination of this tourist attraction

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Fri, May 22, 2015 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Thu, May 21, 2015 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED World: Thu, May 21, 2015 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Thu, May 21, 2015 -- 6:00 PM
  • KQED World: Thu, May 21, 2015 -- 4:00 PM

Episode #11232

KQED 9: Wed, May 20, 2015 -- 3:00 PM

BANKING BAD - Five major banks have plead guilty to rigging currencies and manipulating the foreign exchange market in a criminal case brought by the U.S. Department of Justice and other authorities. Judy Woodruff examines the case with Keri Geiger who is covering the story for Bloomberg News.
BIN LADEN - A stack of newly declassified documents released by the Office of the Director of National Intelligence today provides new insight into Osama Bin Laden's personal life and terrorist network. Gwen Ifill discusses this development with Greg Miller of the Washington Post and Brian Fishman, a research fellow at both the New America Foundation and the Combatting Terrorism Center at West Point.
OIL AND WATER - A new report from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has linked the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill to a record number of dolphin deaths in the Gulf of Mexico. Judy Woodruff debriefs with PBS NewsHour correspondent William Brangham.
THINKING MACHINES - Have you ever worried you might lose your job to a robot? New advances in artificial intelligence could make some jobs obsolete. Hari Sreenivasan has the story for the latest installment of our series "Breakthroughs" on innovation and invention.
ON CAMPUS As college seniors prepare to graduate, they turn from worrying about papers and final exams to worrying about the future. But some historically black colleges and universities are worrying about their own futures. How can these schools rise to the challenges facing higher education today? Gwen Ifill explores this question with Johnny Taylor, president and CEO of the Thurgood Marshall College Fund.
COMBATING EXTREMISM - PBS NewsHour special correspondent Kira Kay was granted special access to a group of women on the frontlines of an unusual effort to combat extremism in Morocco. She shares her report, produced in partnership with the Bureau for International Reporting.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Thu, May 21, 2015 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Wed, May 20, 2015 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED World: Wed, May 20, 2015 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Wed, May 20, 2015 -- 6:00 PM
  • KQED World: Wed, May 20, 2015 -- 4:00 PM

Episode #11231

KQED 9: Tue, May 19, 2015 -- 3:00 PM

RECALL - Japanese airbag manufacturer Takata has expanded its recall of cars deemed unsafe due to defective airbags. The company has now recalled 33.8 million vehicles in one of the largest product recalls of any kind in U.S. history. Gwen Ifill has the story.
QUESTION TIME - A federal judge today ordered the U.S. State Department to speed up its release of the thousands of emails Hillary Clinton wrote when she was Secretary of State. Gwen Ifill speaks to Matea Gold of the Washington Post and Peter Nicholas of the Wall Street Journal about Clinton's response and what this could mean for her presidential campaign.
CULTURE AT RISK - In Syria, priceless antiquities are at risk of being damaged, stolen or destroyed in the country's civil war. PBS NewsHour special correspondent Marcia Biggs reports on the fight to save these ancient relics as part of our "Culture at Risk" series.
SIGNING OFF - David Letterman will sign off for the last time tomorrow, capping a late night TV career that lasted for more than three decades. Chief correspondent for arts and culture Jeffrey Brown looks back at Letterman's legacy, and how he changed the late night landscape.
NEWSHOUR BOOKSHELF - Steve Inskeep, co-host of NPR's Morning Edition, has written a new book, "Jacksonland: President Andrew Jackson, Cherokee Chief John Ross, and a Great American Land Grab." Judy Woodruff sat down with Inskeep to discuss the book at Busboys and Poets, a book store and restaurant chain the D.C. area.
FRONTLINE: SECRETS, POLITICS AND TORTURE - PBS NewsHour shares a preview of the new Frontline documentary "Secrets, Politics and Torture," premiering tonight. The film examines the fight over the CIA's controversial interrogation methods, which many have criticized as torture.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Wed, May 20, 2015 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Tue, May 19, 2015 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED World: Tue, May 19, 2015 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Tue, May 19, 2015 -- 6:00 PM
  • KQED World: Tue, May 19, 2015 -- 4:00 PM

Episode #11230

KQED 9: Mon, May 18, 2015 -- 3:00 PM

FIGHT FOR IRAQ - The Islamic State militant group has taken control of the Iraqi city of Ramadi. What does the fall of Ramadi mean in the fight against the Islamic State group? Gwen Ifill speaks to retired Army Colonel Derek Harvey, who is now the director of the Global Initiative on Civil Society and Conflict at the University of South Florida, and Vali Nasr, a Middle East scholar at the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies.
LEVEL OF FORCE - President Obama is prohibiting the federal government from providing some military style equipment to local police departments, as well as putting stricter control on other gear and weapons distributed to law enforcement. This announcement comes as part of the President's push to ease tensions between law enforcement and the communities they serve. Judy Woodruff has the story.
HEAD START AT 50 - Fifty years ago today, President Lyndon Johnson announced the creation of Head Start, a government program designed to support early education for low-income children. PBS NewsHour's April Brown examines the program's legacy and its future as part of our "American Graduate" series, a public media initiative funded by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.
RUNNING - Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont is an Independent seeking the Democratic nomination for president in 2016. Judy Woodruff sat down with Sanders for the latest in our series of interviews with the men and women running for president in 2016.
POLITICS MONDAY - Amy Walter of the Cook Political Report and NPR White House correspondent Tamara Keith join Gwen Ifill for the NewsHour's weekly "Politics Monday" panel.
NEWSHOUR BOOKSHELF - Jeffrey Brown explores the darker side of social media as a platform for public shaming with Jon Ronson, author of the book "So You've Been Publicly Shamed."

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Tue, May 19, 2015 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Mon, May 18, 2015 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED World: Mon, May 18, 2015 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Mon, May 18, 2015 -- 6:00 PM
  • KQED World: Mon, May 18, 2015 -- 4:00 PM

Episode #11229

KQED 9: Fri, May 15, 2015 -- 3:00 PM

DEATH PENALTY - The jury reached a verdict today in the penalty phase of the Boston Marathon bombing trial. Dzhokhar Tsarnaev will be sentenced to death for the 2013 bombing. Judy Woodruff reports.
DEADLY ACCIDENT - Tuesday's Amtrak train derailment has set in motion an examination of the safety systems in place for the country's railroads, and whether these systems have been adequately funded. Judy Woodruff explores these questions with Sarah Feinberg, acting administrator of the Federal Railroad Administration.
LOST AT SEA - Refugees who have taken to the sea in Southeast Asia struggle to find safe harbor. Hari Sreenivasan examines the growing humanitarian crisis with Sarnata Reynolds, senior advisor on human rights at Refugees International.
TWENTY WEEKS - PBS NewsHour's political director Lisa Desjardins reports from Capitol Hill on how Republican lawmakers are attempting to move the abortion debate into a new gear. SHIELDS AND BROOKS - Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and the New York Times' David Brooks analyze the week's top stories.
REMEMBERING B.B. KING - Blues legend B.B. King died Thursday night at home in Las Vegas at the age of 89. PBS NewsHour pays tribute to King, who continued to perform until last October.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Sat, May 16, 2015 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Fri, May 15, 2015 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED World: Fri, May 15, 2015 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Fri, May 15, 2015 -- 6:00 PM
  • KQED World: Fri, May 15, 2015 -- 4:00 PM

Episode #11228

KQED 9: Thu, May 14, 2015 -- 3:00 PM

DEADLY ACCIDENT I - Eight people have now been confirmed dead in the wake of Tuesday's Amtrak train derailment. Part of the discussion surrounding the accident has now turned into a debate over spending on Amtrak and infrastructure. Gwen Ifill examines this debate with Rep. Chaka Fattah, a Democrat from Pennsylvania, and Republican Congressman John Mica of Florida.
DEADLY ACCIDENT II - For a different take on the Philadelphia train derailment, the NewsHour's Stephen Fee reports on how citizens of Philadelphia are helping the victims of the accident in any way they can.
BRIDGING THE GULF - President Obama has convened a summit at Camp David with leaders from six Gulf nations. Judy Woodruff debriefs with NewsHour's chief foreign affairs correspondent Margaret Warner.
HUNTING BOKO HARAM - Nigerian government forces have reportedly been making progress in their campaign against the Islamic militant group Boko Haram. But there has been spillover into neighboring Cameroon, with increased incursions by fleeing extremists. Lindsey Hilsum of Independent Television News was given special access to forces in that country, as they struggle to keep Boko Haram at bay.
TRADE WARS - This week, PBS NewsHour has spoken to leading Senators and the head of a major labor union about the debate surrounding the negotiation of terms for a major trade agreement with Asia. Tonight, Judy Woodruff speaks John Murphy, senior vice president for international policy at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce.
MAKING SENSE - In this week's "Making Sen$e Thursdays" segment, economics correspondent Paul Solman explores the impact of health insurance company Aetna's decision to raise its minimum wage.
NEWSHOUR BOOKSHELF - In her new memoir, author and chef Nora Pouillon writes about her dedication to organic food and her experiences with establishing the first certified organic restaurant in the United States. Jeffrey Brown recently sat down with Pouillon to discuss her new book, "My Organic Life: How a Pioneering Chef Helped Shape the Way We Eat Today."

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Fri, May 15, 2015 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Thu, May 14, 2015 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED World: Thu, May 14, 2015 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Thu, May 14, 2015 -- 6:00 PM
  • KQED World: Thu, May 14, 2015 -- 4:00 PM

Episode #11227

KQED 9: Wed, May 13, 2015 -- 3:00 PM

TRAIN - An Amtrak train traveling from Washington, D.C., to New York derailed in north Philadelphia Tuesday night, killing at least seven and leaving more than 200 injured. Judy Woodruff speaks to Philadelphia Mayor Michael Nutter. Hari Sreenivasan then discusses the derailment with Robert Sumwalt of the National Transportation Safety Board.
TRADE WARS - Yesterday, Senate Democrats blocked efforts to open debate on President Obama's request for "fast track" trade authority. Tonight, Judy Woodruff explores possible next steps in negotiating terms for a major trade agreement with Asia with two key players on opposite sides of the debate, Republican Senator Orrin Hatch from Utah and Democratic Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts.
TRANSGENDER IN AMERICA - Scientists have begun to trace biology's influence over gender identity for children. Special correspondent Jackie Judd reports as part of NewsHour's ongoing series, "Transgender in America."
NEWSHOUR BOOKSHELF - PBS NewsHour's chief correspondent for arts and culture Jeffrey Brown has written a book of poetry entitled "The News." In the collection, Brown retells his experiences as a journalist through poetry. Gwen Ifill recently sat down with Brown to discuss the book and the stories that inspired him.
NEWSHOUR SHARES - The world's oldest known handwritten letter will be on display in London starting today through May 16. The letter was written in 1190, and will be part of a free exhibition at the Business Design Centre in Islington.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Thu, May 14, 2015 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Wed, May 13, 2015 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED World: Wed, May 13, 2015 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Wed, May 13, 2015 -- 6:00 PM
  • KQED World: Wed, May 13, 2015 -- 4:00 PM

Episode #11226

KQED 9: Tue, May 12, 2015 -- 3:00 PM

HIT AGAIN - Another powerful earthquake shook Nepal this morning, less than three weeks after last month's devastating tremblor. Gwen Ifill speaks to Donatella Lorch, a freelance journalist living in Nepal, about how she rode out this latest earthquake.
TRADE WARS - Senate Democrats today blocked efforts to open debate on President Obama's request for "fast track" trade authority, which would allow Congress to ratify or reject, but not amend, trade agreements proposed by the President. AFL-CIO president Richard Trumka joins Gwen Ifill to discuss opposition to President Obama's request within the Democratic Party.
THINKING MACHINES - From instant diagnoses to treatment recommendations, artificial intelligence is helping doctors tailor medical care to each patient's needs. Hari Sreenivasan reports as part of NewsHour's "Breakthroughs" series on invention and innovation.
LOSING OUR RELIGION - A new survey conducted by the Pew Research Center has found the religious landscape in the U.S. to be changing. Jeffrey Brown examines the findings with Alan Cooperman, director of religion research at Pew, and Reverend Doctor Serene Jones, president of the Union Theological Seminary in New York City.
STRUGGLING IN AMERICA - In 2009, Congress streamlined the special visa program for Afghans who served as U.S. military interpreters. However, once these interpreters and their families arrive in the U.S. , they face a whole new set of hurdles. Special correspondent Sean Carberry has the details.
NEWSHOUR BOOKSHELF - In order to capture how Americans live today, art photographer Alec Soth had to return to his roots. Jeffrey Brown has the story.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Wed, May 13, 2015 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Tue, May 12, 2015 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED World: Tue, May 12, 2015 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Tue, May 12, 2015 -- 6:00 PM
  • KQED World: Tue, May 12, 2015 -- 4:00 PM

Episode #11225

KQED 9: Mon, May 11, 2015 -- 3:00 PM

ARCTIC DRILLING - The Obama administration gave conditional approval today for Shell Oil Company to begin offshore drilling off the coast of Alaska. Judy Woodruff speaks to Coral Davenport, who reported the story in the New York Times.
TARGET YEMEN - Fighting in Yemen has intensified ahead of a planned ceasefire that will allow desperately needed medical and food supplies into the war torn nation. Gwen Ifill debriefs with chief foreign affairs correspondent Margaret Warner. < br>LIFE AFTER EBOLA - Over the weekend, the World Health Organization declared Liberia to be Ebola free, after more than a month without a new case being reported. Dr. Ian Crozier, an American health care worker who contracted the disease while working in Sierra Leone, was treated at Emory University Hospital and thought he had recovered, until the disease was found in his eye, nearly causing him to lose his sight. Dr. Crozier sits down with Judy Woodruff to discuss some of the lasting symptoms Ebola survivors experience and should be monitored for.
ATTACKING ALLERGIES - Earlier this year, one scientific study suggested that the best way to prevent peanut allergies in children is to expose them to the nuts early on. But what about those who already have allergies? The NewsHour's Cat Wise reports on some promising new research that may help eliminate life-threatening food allergies.
POLITICS MONDAY - Amy Walter of the Cook Political Report and NPR White House correspondent Tamara Keith join Gwen Ifill for the NewsHour's weekly "Politics Monday" panel.
COMBATING EXTREMISM - After an attack by Islamic extremists in Copenhagen earlier this year, Denmark, like other European nations is struggling to stop its citizens from joining the Islamic State group and other violent extremist organizations. Special correspondent Malcolm Brabant has the story.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Tue, May 12, 2015 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Mon, May 11, 2015 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Mon, May 11, 2015 -- 6:00 PM
  • KQED World: Mon, May 11, 2015 -- 4:00 PM

Episode #11224

KQED 9: Fri, May 8, 2015 -- 3:00 PM

BIG VICTORY - The United Kingdom woke up today after yesterday's national elections to find the same political party in charge, but reelected Prime Minister David Cameron will face new challenges to U. K. unity. Judy Woodruff examines these challenges with Robin Niblett, the director of Chatham House, an independent policy institute in London.
THE UGLY SIDE OF NICE NAILS - A two-part series in the New York Times has uncovered shocking practices in the nail salons of New York City and other big cities, where disadvantaged women work long hours in unhealthy conditions for meager wages. Judy Woodruff speaks to Sarah Maslin Nir, who spent a year investigating this story for the paper.
THINKING MACHINES - From self-driving cars to drones, the field of artificial intelligence continues to grow and push boundaries. But what are the potential road blocks, both technical and ethical, that lie ahead? Hari Sreenivasan investigates in the first in a series of reports for NewsHour's "Breakthroughs" series.
#NOT TRENDING - A sector of the housing market that rarely gets close attention has become the focus of new battles and growing interest. Gwen Ifill discusses this underreported story with OZY co-founder and CEO Carlos Watson as part of NewsHour's "Not Trending" series.
BROOKS AND MARCUS - The New York Times' David Brooks and Washington Post columnist Ruth Marcus analyze the week's top stories.
NEWSHOUR BOOKSHELF - Paul Beatty's new novel "The Sellout" takes an unflinching, at times comic look at race in America. Jeffrey Brown recently sat down with the author at Busboys and Poets, a bookstore and restaurant chain in and around Washington, D.C.
NEWSHOUR SHARES - More than 50 World War II aircraft flew over the nation's capital today to commemorate the 70th anniversary of VE Day, when the Allies defeated Nazi Germany.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Sat, May 9, 2015 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Fri, May 8, 2015 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED World: Fri, May 8, 2015 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Fri, May 8, 2015 -- 6:00 PM
  • KQED World: Fri, May 8, 2015 -- 4:00 PM

Episode #11223

KQED 9: Thu, May 7, 2015 -- 3:00 PM

SPY RULES - A federal appeals court today ruled a National Security Agency program that allowed bulk data collection went too far. Where is the line between privacy and security, and what is the value of such government surveillance? Gwen Ifill explores these questions with Kate Martin, director of the Center for National Security Studies and Stewart Baker, a former general counsel at the NSA and former assistant secretary at the United States Department of Homeland Security under President George W. Bush.
NEPAL RUINS - Religious, cultural and heritage sites throughout Nepal suffered considerable destruction and damage during the recent earthquake in that region. Jeffrey Brown has the story as part of his ongoing series, "Culture at Risk."
IRAN NUKES - In a rare show of bipartisan agreement, the U.S. Senate voted 98-1 today in support of a bill that would let Congress review and possibly reject any final nuclear agreement with Iran. Gwen Ifill discusses the bill with two Senators who support the measure, Republican Sen. John Thune of South Dakota and Democratic Virginia Sen. Tim Kaine.
CITY IN CRISIS - Can Baltimore businesses bounce back from the economic toll of the recent riots and unrest in the city? Economics correspondent Paul Solman investigates in this week's "Making Sen$e Thursdays" segment.
SAFETY ZONE - At one Arizona high school, a group of students has been asked to play an important role in making sure everyone knows what to do in an emergency. PBS NewsHour's April Brown reports as part of our "American Graduate" series.
NEWSHOUR BOOKSHELF - A new book, "The Unraveling: High Hopes and Missed Opportunities in Iraq," explores the price of past missteps in that country. Chief foreign affairs correspondent Margaret Warner recently sat down with the author, British Middle East expert Emma Sky, at Busboys and Poets, a bookstore and restaurant chain in and around Washington, D.C.
NEWSHOUR SHARES - Highways will soon be making room for the first "self-driving" 18-wheeler truck, which has been authorized for test drives on public roads in Nevada. The semis will not be completely autonomous, there will always be a licensed truck driver in the front seat. The goal is to reduce driver fatigue on long trips. But trucking unions are wary of the new technology, as are lawmakers and the public.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Fri, May 8, 2015 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Thu, May 7, 2015 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED World: Thu, May 7, 2015 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Thu, May 7, 2015 -- 6:00 PM
  • KQED World: Thu, May 7, 2015 -- 4:00 PM

Episode #11222

KQED 9: Wed, May 6, 2015 -- 3:00 PM

TAPPED OUT - In the face of an historic drought, California has passed its first mandatory water usage restrictions with penalties attached. Gwen Ifill debriefs with Felicia Marcus, chair of the state water board.
U.K. VOTES - Election Day is just hours away in the United Kingdom. Hari Sreenivasan discusses a race that is too close to call, and one that could determine the nation's future as a member of the European Union, with Dan Balz of the Washington Post, who is in London covering the elections.
#DEFLATEGATE - An NFL commissioned report has found that "it is more probable than not" that New England Patriots employees deflated balls used in the team's conference championship win, giving the team an edge. The report also claims that Patriots quarterback Tom Brady, who denied knowing how the balls were deflated, was "generally aware" of the rules violation. Jeffrey Brown has the story.
STARBUCKS EDUCATION - In the May issue of The Atlantic, higher education writer Amanda Ripley reported on a joint effort by Starbucks and Arizona State University to help baristas complete their college educations. Judy Woodruff speaks with Ripley, Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz and several baristas in pursuit of their degrees.
UP IN SMOKE - Up until now, e-cigarettes have gone unregulated by the federal government. This is about the change as the FDA weighs the interests of industry against public health. Special correspondent John Larson reports.
SHORTWAVE - It has long been known that China is a top buyer of illegal ivory, but the United States is also among the world's biggest ivory markets. NewsHour foreign affairs reporter/producer P.J. Tobia talks to Gwen Ifill about ivory sales in this country. This issue is also the subject of the latest edition of Tobia's weekly podcast, "Shortwave."

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Thu, May 7, 2015 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Wed, May 6, 2015 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED World: Wed, May 6, 2015 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Wed, May 6, 2015 -- 6:00 PM
  • KQED World: Wed, May 6, 2015 -- 4:00 PM

Episode #11221

KQED 9: Tue, May 5, 2015 -- 3:00 PM

TEXAS SHOOTING - The Islamic State has claimed responsibility for Sunday's attack on an exhibit of Muhammad cartoons outside Dallas. It is the first time the group has claimed responsibility for an attack in the United States. Judy Woodruff explores the difficulty of distinguishing homegrown threats from those that stem from abroad with Juan Zarate, a senior adviser at the Center for Strategic and International Studies.
WHAT WE EAT - Increasing worry among consumers over what is in the food they eat has led some big companies to makeover their menus. Most recently, the Panera chain has announced plans to remove at least 150 artificial ingredients from the foods they serve. Gwen Ifill examines this decision with Michael Moss, author of "Salt Sugar Fat: How the Food Giants Hooked Us" and Allison Aubrey, who closely follows the food and nutrition beat for NPR.
UNEQUAL TREATMENT - As end of life planning gains favor with more and more Americans, African Americans remain more skeptical of options such as hospice and advance directives than their white and Latino peers. Special correspondent Sarah Varney reports in collaboration with NewsHour partner, Kaiser Health News. < br>BIRD FLU - Over the weekend, Iowa, the nation's largest egg-producing state, declared a state of emergency in response to an outbreak of bird flu. Gwen Ifill speaks to US Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack about the outbreak.
MIDEAST TOURISM - Two women on opposite sides of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict have become unlikely business partners, offering atypical tours of the Holy Land that include the West Bank. Special correspondent Martin Seemungal has the story.
NEWSHOUR BOOKSHELF - In her new memoir, poet Elizabeth Alexander finds the words to tell her own story of grief. Jeffrey Brown recently sat down with Alexander to discuss her new book, "The Light of the World."
FRONTLINE: OUTBREAK - PBS NewsHour shares a preview of the Frontline documentary "Outbreak," premiering tonight. The film traces the origins of the Ebola outbreak in West Africa.
NEWSHOUR SHARES - A volcanic eruption in Hawaii and new video from NASA showing solar flares both captured headlines today. PBS NewsHour shares more on these fiery bursts.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Wed, May 6, 2015 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Tue, May 5, 2015 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED World: Tue, May 5, 2015 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Tue, May 5, 2015 -- 6:00 PM
  • KQED World: Tue, May 5, 2015 -- 4:00 PM

Episode #11220

KQED 9: Mon, May 4, 2015 -- 3:00 PM

POLITICS MONDAY - Amy Walter of the Cook Political Report and NPR White House correspondent Tamara Keith join Gwen Ifill for the NewsHour's weekly "Politics Monday" panel.
CITY IN CRISIS - Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake has rescinded the mandatory city-wide curfew put in place last week in response to riots over the death of Freddy Gray. The National Guard has also begun pulling out of the city. PBS NewsHour producers Frank Carlson and Noreen Nasir were on the ground yesterday and gathered reactions from Baltimore residents.
PURSUING THE DREAM - According to a new analysis by Harvard's Equality of Opportunity Project, low-income children in Baltimore face some of the worst odds of escaping poverty. The study compared outcomes for poor children growing up in cities and towns around the country. Gwen Ifill learns more from Harvard University economist Nathaniel Hendren, a principal member of the team that did the research.
FIGHT FOR IRAQ - In the final report in her series from Iraq, special correspondent Jane Arraf was granted access to a Shia militia group and its training operation south of Baghdad.
NEWSHOUR BOOKSHELF - A new book, "First Ladies: Presidential Historians on the Lives of 45 Iconic American Women," follows up on C-SPAN's year-long series on the women who have called the White House home. Judy Woodruff recently sat down with Susan Swain, who co-wrote the book along with members of the C-SPAN team, to discuss the lives of public roles of these 45 women.
PAINTING HISTORY - Painter Jacob Lawrence captured the history of the Great Migration in a series of paintings now on view at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. Chief correspondent for arts and culture Jeffrey Brown has the story.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Tue, May 5, 2015 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Mon, May 4, 2015 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED World: Mon, May 4, 2015 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Mon, May 4, 2015 -- 6:00 PM
  • KQED World: Mon, May 4, 2015 -- 4:00 PM

Episode #11219

KQED 9: Fri, May 1, 2015 -- 3:00 PM

CHARGED - Six police officers were charged today after Freddie Gray's death was ruled a homicide. Judy Woodruff discusses this latest development with David Harris, a professor of law at the University of Pittsburgh School of Law and author of the book, "Profiles in Justice: Why Racial Profiling Cannot Work."
CITY IN CRISIS - In Baltimore, some neighborhoods are struggling with hunger after rioters destroyed local stores and corner shops. Hari Sreenivasan tells the story of one neighborhood that was struggling even before the unrest began.
ADDICTION AND INFECTION - In response to an HIV outbreak of historic proportions, Indiana's state legislature has passed a bill allowing drug users in areas affected by the outbreak to exchange used needles for clean ones. Special correspondent Sarah Varney reports from the town of Austin, Indiana. This story was produced in collaboration with our partner Kaiser Health News.
SHIELDS AND BROOKS - Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and the New York Times' David Brooks analyze the week's top stories.
BOXING - This Saturday, boxing's pound-for-pound king Floyd Mayweather will take on his No. 1 competitor Manny Pacquiao for the first time in a match Sports Illustrated has called "the fight of the century." Ahead of the fight, chief correspondent for arts and culture Jeffrey Brown speaks to an up-and-coming boxer about the match and the state of the sport.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Sat, May 2, 2015 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Fri, May 1, 2015 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED World: Fri, May 1, 2015 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Fri, May 1, 2015 -- 6:00 PM
  • KQED World: Fri, May 1, 2015 -- 4:00 PM

Episode #11218

KQED World: Fri, May 1, 2015 -- 12:00 AM

CITY IN CRISIS - Tonight, NewsHour airs two stories out of Baltimore. First, Hari Sreenivasan visits two Baltimore neighborhoods to better understand how race, class and zip code impact perceptions of police in the city. Gwen Ifill then speaks to John Angelos, executive vice president and COO of the Baltimore Orioles. The baseball team played the Chicago White Sox in an empty stadium yesterday after barring fans from the game in the wake of the unrest that followed Freddie Gray's funeral.
BROKEN JUSTICE - Recently, there has been a bipartisan push to reform the nation's criminal justice system. Groups on opposite sides of the political spectrum have come together to launch the Coalition for Public Safety. To learn more, Judy Woodruff turns to Neera Tanden, president of the Center for American Progress and Mark Holden, senior vice president and general counsel of Koch Industries. This segment is the first in our new occasional series, "Broken Justice," that analyzes the issue of imprisonment in America.
CLOSING THE BOOK - 40 years after the end of the Vietnam War, special correspondent Mike Cerre, a former U.S. Marine who served in the war, tells the story of a small group of Marines and journalists who have returned to the country to mark this significant anniversary.
MAKING SENSE: ALMONDS - Economics correspondent Paul Solman reports on the impact almond production has had on the California drought for this week's "Making Sen$e Thursdays" segment.
ART SPACE - New York City's Whitney art museum will be reopening in a new location tomorrow. The museum has moved from its location on the Upper East Side to Lower Manhattan. Chief correspondent for arts and culture Jeffrey Brown has the story.

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TV Technical Issues

TV
    TV Technical Issues
    • KQET planned overnight outage, early Friday 3/13

      (DT25-1 through 25-3) Another station on Fremont Tower needs to perform more maintenance work overnight, requiring other TV stations to shut down their signals for the safety of the workers. KQET’s signal will turn off late Thurs/early Friday between midnight and 12:30am, and should return by 6am Friday morning. Many receivers will be able to […]

    • KQET planned overnight outage, early Wed 3/11

      (DT25-1 through 25-3) Another station on Fremont Tower needs to perform maintenance work overnight, requiring that other TV stations shut down their signals for the safety of the workers. KQET’s signal will turn off late Tues/early Wednesday between midnight and 12:30am, and should return by 5am Wednesday morning. Many receivers will be able to recover […]

    • Thurs 3/05, DT54-1 thru DT54-5: 2 planned, extremely brief Over the Air outages

      (DT54.1 through DT54.5) Our Over the Air signals from our KQEH transmitter on Monument Peak (the DT54s) will need to be switched from our Main antenna to our Auxillary antenna while climbers inspect the tower for possible maintenance needs. Once the inspection is done, we will switch back. The two switches will account for two […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Channels 9.1, 54.2 & 25.1 - Monterey (KQET)
XFINITY 9 and HD 709

All widescreen and HD programs

KQED Plus

KQED +
Channels 54, 54.1, 9.2 & 25.2 - Monterey
XFINITY 10 and HD 710

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life
Channel 54.3
XFINITY 189

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Channel 9.3
XFINITY 190

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Channel 54.5 & 25.3
XFINITY 191 & 621

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Channel 54.4
XFINITY 192

Quality children's programming parents love too