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PBS NewsHour Previous Broadcasts

Episode #11154

KQED 9: Fri, Jan 30, 2015 -- 3:00 PM

FRONT LINES - The crisis in Ukraine has intensified with fighting in the east as peace talks scheduled in Belarus were cancelled after rebel delegates refused to participate. Judy Woodruff debriefs with Shaun Walker of The Guardian, who just returned from eastern Ukraine, and is currently in Kiev.
PERSONALIZED MEDICINE - Science correspondent Miles O'Brien speaks to NIH director Dr. Francis Collins about the Obama administration's push to spur personalized medicine.
INDIE FLICKS - Increasingly, directors are trading the theater for the small screen as the popularity of video on-demand continues to grow. What does this mean for independent filmmakers? Jeffrey Brown reports from the Sundance Film Festival.
ON DEFENSE - The New England Patriots and the Seattle Seahawks will face off in Super Bowl XLIX this Sunday. The season has been riddled with scandals, and has placed the NFL on the defensive more than once. Hari Sreenivasan takes stock with Kevin Blackistone, a sports journalist and commentator for ESPN, and Christine Brennan, the national sports columnist for USA Today and a commentator for ABC News.
SHIELDS AND BROOKS - Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks analyze the week's top stories. NEWSHOUR SHARES - Tonight's NewsHour Shares comes from the New York Times where a recent "Op-Doc"- a short, opinionated documentary- takes a look at a mother's efforts to manage her daughter's struggle with Type I diabetes.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Sat, Jan 31, 2015 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Fri, Jan 30, 2015 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED World: Fri, Jan 30, 2015 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Fri, Jan 30, 2015 -- 6:00 PM
  • KQED World: Fri, Jan 30, 2015 -- 4:00 PM

Episode #11153

KQED 9: Thu, Jan 29, 2015 -- 3:00 PM

KIDS BEHIND BARS - A new report released today on the state of juvenile justice in the U.S. finds that youth who serve time in state-run detention centers have a higher chance being arrested again after their release. Judy Woodruff examines these findings with Xavier McElrath-Bey of the Campaign for the Fair Sentencing of Youth and Michael Thompson, director of the Council of State Governments Justice Center.
TROUBLED SKIES - The Malaysian government has officially declared the disappearance of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 last March an accident. Gwen Ifill discusses this latest development with science correspondent Miles O'Brien.
RETHINKING IRAN - The Senate Banking Committee voted to advance a bill today that would toughen sanctions against Iran if negotiators fail to reach an agreement on the country's nuclear program by the end of June. In the second of two reports done in collaboration with The Atlantic Magazine, Judy Woodruff explores the challenges and benefits of reaching a deal.
PAYING THE TROOPS - Although veterans are frequently thanked for their service, an independent commission has released new recommendations on how they should be compensated. Hari Sreenivasan speaks to the chairman of this commission, Alphonso Maldon.
IN THE CROSSHAIRS - The Oscar-nominated film "American Sniper" has generated a great deal of conversation and controversy with its depiction of war, and its portrayal of a real American soldier. Jeffrey Brown has the story as part of a new, occasional series, "NewsHour at the Movies."
BIG BETS - Economics correspondent Paul Solman takes a trip to Las Vegas ahead of this weekend's Super Bowl for a look at the economics of sports betting. This report is the latest installment of NewsHour's new regular feature "Making Sen$e Thursdays," part of Solman's ongoing reporting on "Making Sen$e of business and economics.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Fri, Jan 30, 2015 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Thu, Jan 29, 2015 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED World: Thu, Jan 29, 2015 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Thu, Jan 29, 2015 -- 6:00 PM
  • KQED World: Thu, Jan 29, 2015 -- 4:00 PM

Episode #11152

KQED 9: Wed, Jan 28, 2015 -- 3:00 PM

HOSTAGE CRISIS - A potential exchange of prisoners may be in the works between Jordan and the Islamic State group. Officials in Amman today announced their willingness to deviate from a long-standing policy against negotiating with terrorist groups, making Jordan the latest nation to debate how far a country should go to save its citizens. Gwen Ifill debriefs with chief foreign affairs correspondent Margaret Warner.
FIGHTING HEROIN ADDICTION - A new investigative report from the Huffington Post explores the moral and medical dispute over using prescription drugs to treat heroin addiction. Hari Sreenivasan speaks to Ryan Grim, the Washington bureau chief for the Huffington Post and an editor of the article. < br>RETHINKING IRAN - In the first of two reports done in collaboration with The Atlantic, Judy Woodruff hears arguments for and against rethinking U.S.-Iran relations.
BIG SPENDERS - Charles and David Koch may not be running for president, but they have big plans for 2016. The brothers are making plans to outspend both major political parties in the next presidential election. In addition to using their fortune to create a network of conservative and libertarian think tanks, the brothers are also major philanthropists. They give money to education, the arts and public television. Gwen Ifill sits down with Matea Gold of The Washington Post to discuss the Koch brothers' spending.
THOSE WHO SERVE - The new Congress has the fewest military veterans since World War II. However, the number of recent veterans in Congress, who served in Iraq and Afghanistan, has gone up. Judy Woodruff examines this shift with two newly elected recent veterans, Republican Rep. Martha McSally, a retired Air Force Colonel who served in Iraq and Afghanistan, and Democratic Rep. Seth Moulton, a retired Marine Captain who served four tours in Iraq.
QUIET COMFORT - In San Francisco, public libraries are making an effort to help homeless patrons. PBS NewsHour's Cat Wise has the story.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Thu, Jan 29, 2015 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Wed, Jan 28, 2015 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED World: Wed, Jan 28, 2015 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Wed, Jan 28, 2015 -- 6:00 PM
  • KQED World: Wed, Jan 28, 2015 -- 4:00 PM

Episode #11151

KQED 9: Tue, Jan 27, 2015 -- 3:00 PM

WINTER BLAST - While New England is blanketed in over two feet of snow, yesterday's blizzard failed to live up to forecasts in New York City. Megan Thompson of PBS NewsHour Weekend once again joins us from New York.
ANNIVERSARY OF AUSCHWITZ LIBERATION - Today marks the 70th anniversary of the liberation of the Nazi concentration camp Auschwitz. Paul Davies of Independent Television News has our report. DRILLING DOWN - The Obama administration outlined a plan today that would allow offshore drilling off the southeastern Atlantic coast for the first time. Judy Woodruff analyzes the President's plan with Amy Harder of the Wall Street Journal.
OVER A BARREL - The push for more oil and gas comes in the wake of a record boom in domestic production. While the resulting drop in oil prices has pleased many consumers, it has caused a different reaction among oil producers. Emily Guerin of Inside Energy, a public media collaboration on energy issues, reports from North Dakota on the impact the oil boom is having on businesses in that state.
EUROPE ON EDGE - In part two of a two-part report, chief foreign affairs correspondent Margaret Warner examines the factors driving some young Muslims in the United Kingdom to extremism, and what is being done about it.
COMPLEX RELATIONSHIP - The death of Saudi Arabia's monarch has highlighted the complex relationship between that nation and the U.S. While the two countries are strong allies, beyond praise from the U.S. lie serious questions about Saudi Arabia's human rights record. Judy Woodruff discusses how the two nations navigate this relationship with Gary Sick, senior research scholar at Columbia University's Middle East Institute, and a former National Security Council staff member, and Tom Porteous, the deputy program director at Human Rights Watch.
NATIVE TONGUES - By the end of the century, more than half of the over 6,000 languages spoken today will vanish. A new documentary, "Language Matters," takes a look at endangered languages around the world and what is being done to preserve them.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Wed, Jan 28, 2015 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Tue, Jan 27, 2015 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED World: Tue, Jan 27, 2015 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Tue, Jan 27, 2015 -- 6:00 PM
  • KQED World: Tue, Jan 27, 2015 -- 4:00 PM

Episode #11150

KQED 9: Mon, Jan 26, 2015 -- 3:00 PM

HUNKERING DOWN - Cities, towns and highway crews from Pennsylvania to Maine are bracing for severe winter weather as a blizzard is predicted to hit the northeastern United States. Megan Thompson of PBS NewsHour Weekend reports from New York.
INTO THE WILD - President Obama is seeking new limits on drilling for oil in Alaska, in the first of several moves aimed at holding back production. Judy Woodruff explores how the President's proposal may impact residents of that state with Republican Alaskan Senator Lisa Murkowski. She then turns to the cabinet official who is implementing the new policy, Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell.
EUROPE ON EDGE - In part one of a two-part report, chief foreign affairs correspondent Margaret Warner reports from the United Kingdom on the factors driving young Muslims there to extremism, and what is being done about it.
GUANTANAMO DIARY - Despite President Obama's pledge to close Guantanamo Bay, outgoing Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel told National Public Radio today that closing the facility is going to be a major challenge. One detainee's story has just been published. Hari Sreenivasan has the details.
POLITICS MONDAY - For Republican hopefuls, the 2016 race for the White House has already begun. On Saturday, nearly a dozen potential candidates made their way to Iowa to woo conservative activists at the inaugural Freedom Summit. On Sunday, focus shifted to Palm Springs, California, the location of the winter meeting of Freedom Partners, a conservative group aligned with the billionaire Koch Brothers. Judy Woodruff sits down with Amy Walter of the Cook Political Report and Nia-Malika Henderson of the Washington Post to discuss these recent events.
HOLLYWOOD GOES VIRTUAL - Filmmakers are exploring virtual reality to take entertainment to a new level. Jeffrey Brown investigated the power and appeal of virtual reality at this year's Sundance Film Festival.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Tue, Jan 27, 2015 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Mon, Jan 26, 2015 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED World: Mon, Jan 26, 2015 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Mon, Jan 26, 2015 -- 6:00 PM
  • KQED World: Mon, Jan 26, 2015 -- 4:00 PM

Episode #11149H

KQED 9: Fri, Jan 23, 2015 -- 3:00 PM

SAUDI ARABIA - New leaders took hold today in Saudi Arabia, in the wake of King Abdullah's passing. Judy Woodruff reports.
VOLATILE REGION - The death of Saudi King Abdullah comes the same week as Yemen's President stepped down amidst political turmoil. Judy Woodruff explores the challenges these recent events pose to the region, and to the U.S., with Leon Panetta, former CIA director and Secretary of Defense under the Obama administration, and Stephen Hadley, former assistant to the president for National Security Affairs under the George W. Bush administration.
CRITICAL ELECTION - Battling high unemployment and punishing austerity measures, Greeks are headed to the ballot box this weekend. As the rest of Europe watches the results, the country's fragile economy hangs in the balance. Hari Sreenivasan has the story.
SHIELDS AND BROOKS - Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and the New York Times' David Brooks analyze the weekstop stories.
SLEATER-KINNEY - The reunion of indie rock band Sleater-Kinney has fans and critics excited. Hari Sreenivasan takes a look at the return of a band with a signature sound, style and songs that resonate.
NEWSHOUR SHARES - For our "NewsHour Shares" moment of the day, we travel back to 1973 and perhaps the most eventful 72 hours in U.S. history.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Sat, Jan 24, 2015 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Fri, Jan 23, 2015 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED World: Fri, Jan 23, 2015 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Fri, Jan 23, 2015 -- 6:00 PM
  • KQED World: Fri, Jan 23, 2015 -- 4:00 PM

Episode #11148H

KQED 9: Thu, Jan 22, 2015 -- 3:00 PM

YEMEN COLLAPSE - In Yemen, the U.S.-backed president and his cabinet have stepped down after Shiite rebels effectively took over the country's capital, confining the president to his home. Gwen Ifill discusses this development with Gregory D. Johnsen, author of "The Last Refuge: Yemen, al-Qaeda, and America's War in Arabia."
TARGETING THE ISLAMIC STATE GROUP - As members of the international coalition to combat the Islamic State militant group gather in London, chief foreign affairs correspondent Margaret Warner sits down with British foreign minister Philip Hammond for a conversation about the effort to take down the group.
FAMILY LEAVE - Earlier this week, President Obama called attention to the issue of paid family leave during his State of the Union address. Economics correspondent Paul Solman explores the debate over paid family leave and its impact on the economy as part of his ongoing reporting on "Making Sen$e" of financial news.
#POLITICS - Prior to this year's State of the Union address, the White House made an effort to promote President Obama's speech across various social media channels. Today, the push continued as the President was interviewed by several YouTube "stars, " people with large followings on the video sharing site. Judy Woodruff examines these efforts with Kori Schulman, director of online engagement for the office of digital strategy at the White House. She then turns to Brian Donahue, a founder and partner of CRAFT Media/Digital, William Powers, author of "Hamlet's BlackBerry," and Hank Green, one of the YouTube stars tasked with interviewing the President.
STANDARDIZED TESTING - What is the proper role and use of standardized testing? Congress must consider this question as they begin to tackle a new federal education law. It is also at the heart of a new book that looks at the controversy surrounding testing and its possible future. Hari Sreenivasan has the story.
NEWSHOUR SHARES - For our "NewsHour Shares" moment of the day, we take a look back to 1973 and perhaps the most eventful 72 hours in U.S. history.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Fri, Jan 23, 2015 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Thu, Jan 22, 2015 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED World: Thu, Jan 22, 2015 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Thu, Jan 22, 2015 -- 6:00 PM
  • KQED World: Thu, Jan 22, 2015 -- 4:00 PM

Episode #11147H

KQED 9: Wed, Jan 21, 2015 -- 3:00 PM

ALL POLITICS ARE LOCAL - How are people outside of Washington reacting to last night's State of the Union address? Judy Woodruff speaks to Stephen Benjamin, Mayor of Columbia, South Carolina, and Richard Berry, Mayor of Albuquerque, New Mexico.
HISTORIC TALKS - Today marked a turning point in U.S.-Cuba relations, as the two nations opened their highest-level talks in over three decades. Gwen Ifill examines the move with Indira Lakshmanan of Bloomberg News.
SCOTUS - The U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments today in a housing discrimination case that could have sweeping effects across the country. Judy Woodruff analyzes the case with the National Law Journal's Marcia Coyle.
I DO? - As many states move to legalize same sex marriage, a backlash is underway in some quarters. In Colorado, a bakery owner is refusing to cater same sex weddings, and argues that the state cannot force him to do so. Hari Sreenivasan reports on the ongoing legal battle between religious expression and equal rights.
EBOLA - One of guests sitting with first lady Michelle Obama during the State of the Union last night was Dr. Pranav Shetty, a doctor back from the front lines of fight against the Ebola epidemic in west Africa. Dr. Shetty sat down with Judy Woodruff before the President's speech last night to discuss the continuing efforts to combat the disease.
DEFLATED - The New England Patriots defeated the Indianapolis Colts this weekend, earning a spot in this year's Super Bowl. Immediately after the game, however, questions began to surface as to whether the team had cheated by using underinflated footballs. Hari Sreenivasan explores these accusations with Ben Volin, the national NFL reporter for the Boston Globe.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Thu, Jan 22, 2015 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Wed, Jan 21, 2015 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED World: Wed, Jan 21, 2015 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Wed, Jan 21, 2015 -- 6:00 PM
  • KQED World: Wed, Jan 21, 2015 -- 4:00 PM

State of the Union Address (Episode #11146H)

KQED 9: Tue, Jan 20, 2015 -- 3:00 PM

STATE OF THE UNION - Tonight at 9 p.m. EST, President Obama will address the nation in his sixth annual State of the Union. In advance of the President's speech, PBS NewsHour will feature special coverage from Capitol Hill and the White House, as well as pre-speech analysis from syndicated columnist Mark Shields and the New York Times' David Brooks. Tune in tonight at 9 p.m. for a two-hour special featuring the President's speech and the Republican response, along with additional analysis from Mark Shields and David Brooks.
*A note for West Coast viewers: Because the President's address begins at 6 p. m. PT our regular broadcast will not air on the West Coast tonight. Viewers can tune in to our State of the Union coverage at 6 p.m. PT.
RANSOM DEMAND - The Islamic State group has released another hostage video. The video shows two Japanese nationals, and the militant extremists are threatening to kill the hostages if $200 million in ransom is not paid within 72 hours. Jeffrey Brown discusses the situation with author and CIA veteran Robert Baer.
SCOTUS - Today the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in favor of an Arkansas prisoner who wanted to grow a beard for religious reasons, but had been barred from doing so by prison rules. The justices also heard arguments in a case that could unravel state laws regarding judicial candidates soliciting donations. Judy Woodruff examines both cases with the National Law Journal's Marcia Coyle.
AURORA TRIAL - Jury selection began today in the trial of James Holmes, the man charged with the 2012 mass shooting at a movie theater in Aurora, Colorado. Gwen Ifill speaks to Mary MacCarthy, who has covered this case for Feature News Story. MacCarthy is based out of Rocky Mountain PBS and was at the courthouse today.
LIFE LESSONS - A California public school has shifted its focus to preparing students for careers in medicine and biotech. PBS NewsHour's April Brown reports as part of our "American Graduate" project.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Wed, Jan 21, 2015 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED 9: Wed, Jan 21, 2015 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Tue, Jan 20, 2015 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED World: Tue, Jan 20, 2015 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Tue, Jan 20, 2015 -- 6:00 PM
  • KQED World: Tue, Jan 20, 2015 -- 4:00 PM

Episode #11145H

KQED 9: Mon, Jan 19, 2015 -- 3:00 PM

FIGHT FOR YEMEN - Violent clashes in the capital of Yemen have raised fears that a power vacuum could benefit terrorists based in the Middle East. Judy Woodruff analyzes what is driving the violence and Yemen's links to global terror with Abdulwahab Alkebsi of the Center for International Private Enterprise.
EUROPE ON EDGE - In the wake of recent terror attacks in Paris, European Union officials have called for an alliance with Muslim-majority countries in the fight to secure Europe. Chief foreign correspondent Margaret Warner reports from London on the British reaction.
IMMIGRATION DIVIDE - The divide over immigration policy was a major theme in this year's congressional elections, but the issue is not just roiling politicians. On a recent visit to Nevada, Gwen Ifill discovered the issue has caused difficult splits within many families.
WEALTH DEBATE - President Obama has unveiled a new tax proposal, which has thrown fresh fuel into the ongoing debate over economic mobility and inequality in the United States. Jeffrey Brown examines the plan's framework and the political strategy surrounding it with Neil Irwin of the New York Times.
TRUST THAT REVIEW? - How trustworthy are online product reviews? Special correspondent Jackie Judd investigates how the online review system is being exploited, and what businesses are doing to crack down.
JOHN CLEESE - Jeffrey Brown sits down with comedian John Cleese to discuss his new memoir, "So, Anyway ..."
NEWSHOUR SHARES - Today marks the 60th anniversary of the first televised presidential news conference. PBS NewsHour shares an excerpt of President Dwight Eisenhower's exchange with the press in 1955.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Tue, Jan 20, 2015 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Mon, Jan 19, 2015 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED World: Mon, Jan 19, 2015 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Mon, Jan 19, 2015 -- 6:00 PM
  • KQED World: Mon, Jan 19, 2015 -- 4:00 PM

Episode #11144

KQED 9: Fri, Jan 16, 2015 -- 3:00 PM

SAME SEX MARRIAGE - Should same sex couples be allowed to marry nationwide? The U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to hear arguments at the heart of this debate. They will consider cases stemming from four different states. Judy Woodruff analyzes this latest move with Marcia Coyle of the National Law Journal.
HEATING UP - 2014 was the hottest year on record according to separate analyses by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and NASA. For further insight on these findings Judy Woodruff turns to Gavin Schmidt director of NASA's Godard Institute for Space Studies.
POWER STRUGGLE - The EPA is pushing cleaner energy by moving American electricity away from coal. How is this viewed in Wyoming, one of the nation's key energy producing states? Leigh Paterson of Inside Energy, a public media collaboration on energy issues, has our report.
MAJOR SHIFT - U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder today announced a major shift in how state and local police departments are permitted to seize and auction off property from those who are not convicted of a crime. Hari Sreenivasan discusses the change with the New Yorker's Sarah Stillman.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Sat, Jan 17, 2015 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Fri, Jan 16, 2015 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED World: Fri, Jan 16, 2015 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Fri, Jan 16, 2015 -- 6:00 PM
  • KQED World: Fri, Jan 16, 2015 -- 4:00 PM

Episode #11143

KQED 9: Thu, Jan 15, 2015 -- 3:00 PM

EUROPE ON EDGE - Security forces foiled what could have been another European terror attack in Belgium today. Gwen Ifill discusses today's raid and its aftermath with Lorenzo Vidino of the European Foundation for Democracy.
ON DEFENSE - In a controversial piece for The Atlantic, journalist James Fallows offered a provocative look at America's armed forces. Chief foreign affairs correspondent Margaret Warner sat down with Fallows for a conversation about the article. For a reaction to Fallows' piece, Judy Woodruff turns to former U.S. ambassador to Iraq James Jeffrey and John Ullyot, a former intelligence officer in the U.S. Marine Corps who is now managing director at the High Lantern Group.
RACE, GENDER AND HOLLYWOOD - Within minutes of this year's Oscar nominations being announced this morning, many were criticizing the lack of diversity among the nominees. What, if anything, does this tell us about the academy, or about the films themselves? Gwen Ifill speaks to Mike Sargent, a film critic for Pacifica Radio, and Ann Hornaday of the Washington Post.
THE RAP ON CHINA - Economics correspondent Paul Solman gets a musical take on new wealth and inflation in China from a stand-up comedian who wraps the economic blues.
HANDS FREE - In the car of the future, will passengers take a backseat to self-driving technology? Special correspondent Steve Goldbloom reports.
NOT TRENDING - When we surf the web for the latest news, we're drawn to stories that are "trending." What are we missing out on? Gwen Ifill and OZY CEO Carlos Watson go behind the headlines for a closer look at some underappreciated news stories.
NEWSHOUR SHARES - Tonight's "NewsHour Shares" comes from the New York Times. The paper is asking the public to help identify the subjects of a famous photographer's picture.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Fri, Jan 16, 2015 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Thu, Jan 15, 2015 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED World: Thu, Jan 15, 2015 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Thu, Jan 15, 2015 -- 6:00 PM
  • KQED World: Thu, Jan 15, 2015 -- 4:00 PM

Episode #11142

KQED 9: Wed, Jan 14, 2015 -- 3:00 PM

FREE SPEECH - In the aftermath of last week's terrorist attack, the French government has been cracking down on hate speech. Where is the line between hate speech, satire and opinion? Judy Woodruff explores this question with Radio France journalist and senior editor Bertrand Vannier, Erik Bleich, a professor of political science at Middlebury College and the author of, "The Freedom to Be Racist? How the United States and Europe Struggle to Preserve Freedom and Combat Racism," and Daisy Khan, the executive director of the American Society for Muslim Advancement.
OFF TO THE RACES - As speculation turns into action, the 2016 race for president has moved from mostly theoretical to quite substantial. Gwen Ifill analyzes the campaign landscape with Nia-Malika Henderson, political reporter for the Washington Post, and Amy Walter, national editor for the Cook Political Report.
UNDER THE RADAR - Scripps reporter Mark Greenblatt reports on how convicted sex offenders discharged from the military are able to fall under the radar, slipping unnoticed into civilian communities.
CLEARING THE AIR - The Obama administration announced a plan today to issue the first regulations to cut down on methane emissions produced by gas drilling and oil production. For a closer look at the concerns around methane and the potential impact of these regulations, Judy Woodruff speaks to Coral Davenport of the New York Times and Michael Oppenheimer, a climate scientist at Princeton University.
GRIPPING CLIMB - Rock climbers Kevin Jorgeson and Tommy Caldwell made history today in California's Yosemite National Park when they completed what's being called the hardest in the world. Gwen Ifill discusses the feat with rock climber and freelance writer Chris Weidner.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Thu, Jan 15, 2015 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Wed, Jan 14, 2015 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED World: Wed, Jan 14, 2015 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Wed, Jan 14, 2015 -- 6:00 PM
  • KQED World: Wed, Jan 14, 2015 -- 4:00 PM

Episode #11141

KQED 9: Tue, Jan 13, 2015 -- 3:00 PM

NEW BEGINNINGS - President Obama met with congressional leaders this morning to discuss issues ranging from the economy to national security. Just a week into the new Republican-controlled Congress, he called for cooperation between all sides. Gwen Ifill and Judy Woodruff get the latest from PBS NewsHour political director Domenico Montanaro and political editor Lisa Desjardins.
BELLWETHER - Judy Woodruff reports from Ohio, where she heard what voters in the Buckeye State had to say about Washington dysfunction and how lawmakers can get past it.
TERROR IN NIGERIA - In a remote northeast region of Nigeria, the terrorist group Boko Haram has been on a rampage, conducting mass kidnappings and waging bloody attacks on civilians. Gwen Ifill discusses the attacks and why word of the violence was slow to get out with Nii Akuetteh, a D.C.-based Democracy activist.
FLU This year's flu season is shaping up to be the worst in several years. Why are some health officials urging doctors to prescribe antiviral drugs more often? Judy Woodruff speaks to CDC director Dr. Thomas Frieden about what actions he thinks the public should be taking, and why some in the medical field are questioning those recommendations.
TRAFFICKING - Part II of special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro's report on the push to end sex trafficking in India follows another rescue attempt. This report is part of our "Agents for Change" series.
FRONTLINE: PUTIN'S WAY - PBS NewsHour shares an excerpt of a new FRONTLINE documentary that investigates the accusations of corruption and criminality that have surrounded Vladimir Putin's reign in Russia.
NEWSHOUR SHARES - In the latest edition of "NewsHour Shares," PBS NewsHour shines a light on a moment that caught our eye, and that might be of interest to you too.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Wed, Jan 14, 2015 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Tue, Jan 13, 2015 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED World: Tue, Jan 13, 2015 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Tue, Jan 13, 2015 -- 6:00 PM
  • KQED World: Tue, Jan 13, 2015 -- 4:00 PM

Episode #11140

KQED 9: Mon, Jan 12, 2015 -- 3:00 PM

PARIS ATTACK - The revelation that one of the brothers involved in last week's terrorist attacks in Paris received training from al-Qaida in Yemen has placed that terrorist group, and Yemen, back in the spotlight. Gwen Ifill speaks to chief foreign affairs correspondent Margaret Warner.
JE SUIS JUIF - In the wake of last week's terrorist attacks, France is stepping up security efforts, including sending troops to Jewish schools, synagogues and other sites around the country. Prior to last week's tragedy, rising anti-Semitism in France had prompted many Jews to leave for Israel. Gwen Ifill discusses the situation with Jeffrey Goldberg, a national correspondent for The Atlantic.
TRAFFICKING - Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports from India on efforts to hold the nation's police forces accountable in the fight against human trafficking. This is part one of a two-part report in his "Agents for Change" series.
NEW WHEELS - As the North American International Auto Show kicks off in Detroit, many question how falling gas prices will affect American car buying. Gwen Ifill explores this question with John Stoll of the Wall Street Journal. < br>PARTISAN DIVIDE - Congress is back in session, and now fully in Republican control. PBS NewsHour recently listened in on a focus group moderated by Democratic pollster Peter Hart to hear what people had to say about the partisan divide in Washington and whether or not it can be bridged. For a deeper look at what's causing partisan gridlock, Judy Woodruff sat down with Democrat Martin Frost and Republican Tom Davis, authors of a new book, "The Partisan Divide." < br>ARTS AND LETTERS - The U.S. government has released new data that shows the arts and culture sectors contribute more to the U.S. economy than previously thought. Jeffrey Brown is joined by the heads of the National Endowment for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Humanities, for a conversation about the state of the arts in 2015.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Tue, Jan 13, 2015 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Mon, Jan 12, 2015 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED World: Mon, Jan 12, 2015 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Mon, Jan 12, 2015 -- 6:00 PM
  • KQED World: Mon, Jan 12, 2015 -- 4:00 PM

Episode #11139

KQED 9: Fri, Jan 9, 2015 -- 3:00 PM

TERROR IN FRANCE I - The manhunt for the gunmen responsible for the terrorist attack in Paris this week came to a violent end today with twin hostage takings in two separate police standoffs. Judy Woodruff debriefs with Mark Austin of Independent Television News, who is on the ground in Paris.
TERROR IN FRANCE II - Although the search for the gunmen has ended, many questions remain about the terrorist attack in France, and what it means for security in the West. Judy Woodruff interprets recent events with Peter Neumann, director of the International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation at King's College in London, and Juan Zarate, former White House deputy national security adviser for combating terrorism from 2005-2009.
ON THE REBOUND - The latest jobs report shows that the economy added just over a quarter million jobs in December, capping off the best year of job growth since 1999. In spite of this, the Federal Reserve is in no rush to raise interest rates. Economics correspondent Paul Solman explains as part of his ongoing reporting on "Making Sen$e" of financial news.
TUITION BREAK - President Obama has unveiled an ambitious plan to offer two years of free tuition for community college, but questions remain about the proposal, and what it could mean for access and affordability. Hari Sreenivasan examines those questions with Josh Wyner, vice president and executive director of the College Excellence Program at the Aspen Institute, and Andrew Kelly, director of the Center on Higher Education Reform at the American Enterprise Institute.
SHIELDS & BROOKS - Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and the New York Times' David Brooks analyze this week's tops stories.
GEAR & GADGETS 2015 - The International Consumer Electronics Show is being held this week in Las Vegas. This annual event is closely watched each year by those seeking a preview of the latest gadgets that are heading to market. Special correspondent Steve Goldbloom reports from Las Vegas on why this year's show is a little bit different.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Sat, Jan 10, 2015 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Fri, Jan 9, 2015 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED World: Fri, Jan 9, 2015 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Fri, Jan 9, 2015 -- 6:00 PM
  • KQED World: Fri, Jan 9, 2015 -- 4:00 PM

Episode #11138

KQED 9: Thu, Jan 8, 2015 -- 3:00 PM

PARIS ATTACKS - France mourned today in the aftermath of yesterday's terrorist attack in Paris. Hari Sreenivasan speaks to Mark Austin of Independent Television News, who is on the ground in Paris.
CULTURE CLASH - The terrorist attack in Paris yesterday placed a spotlight on tensions between traditional French society and the country's growing immigrant population. What is behind these tensions? PBS NewsHour's Megan Thompson took a firsthand look during a recent visit to the port city of Marseilles.
RADICALIZATION OF MUSLIMS - Why are some young, Western Muslims turning towards radical interpretations of Islam? Judy Woodruff explores this question with Peter Neumann, director of the International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation at King's College London.
SELMA - Gwen Ifill sits down with Ava DuVernay, director of the film "Selma," to discuss her take on a pivotal time in the civil rights movement.
THE MARSHMALLOW MEASURE - Many behavioral economists suggest that children who exhibit self-control at an early age have better outcomes later in life. Can self-restraint be taught? Economics correspondent Paul Solman investigates as part of his ongoing reporting on "Making Sen$e" of financial news.
#JESUISCHARLIE - In the wake of the terrorist attack in Paris yesterday, vigils were held around the world to show solidarity with the journalists and cartoonists slain for producing political satire. Jeffrey Brown examines the thin line walked by political and cultural cartoonists and satirists with columnist and syndicated editorial cartoonist Ted Ralls and political cartoonist Tom Toles of the Washington Post.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Fri, Jan 9, 2015 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Thu, Jan 8, 2015 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED World: Thu, Jan 8, 2015 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Thu, Jan 8, 2015 -- 6:00 PM
  • KQED World: Thu, Jan 8, 2015 -- 4:00 PM

Episode #11137

KQED 9: Wed, Jan 7, 2015 -- 3:00 PM

PARIS ATTACKS - Hooded gunmen fled today after attacking the Paris office of a French satirical newspaper known for its controversial cartoons. As world leaders condemn the attack, cities across Europe are holding vigils for the victims and in support of free speech. Hari Sreenivasan debriefs with Mark Austin of Independent Television News, who is on the ground in Paris. Judy Woodruff then speaks to Michael Leiter, former director of the National Counterterrorism Center, and Bertrand Vannier.
DANGEROUS BUSINESS - A career in journalism is an increasingly dangerous pursuit. 2014 was the most dangerous year for journalists since watchdog organizations have been keeping track of the number of reporters jailed and killed. Jeffrey Brown sat down with Joel Simon, executive director of the Committee to Protect Journalists, for a conversation about his recent book, "The New Censorship: Inside the Global Battle for Media Freedom."
McCONNELL RISING - With the seating of the new Congress this week, Kentucky Senator Mitch McConnell has become the leader of his chamber and one of the most powerful people in the country. PBS NewsHour political editor and reporter Lisa Desjardins takes a closer look at the man and the leader.
TAKING OFF - As the number of drones in the United States continues to grow, so do safety concerns. Science correspondent Miles O'Brien reports on the increasing popularity of the small, unmanned aerial vehicles, and the unique problems they pose for regulators.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Thu, Jan 8, 2015 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Wed, Jan 7, 2015 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED World: Wed, Jan 7, 2015 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Wed, Jan 7, 2015 -- 6:00 PM
  • KQED World: Wed, Jan 7, 2015 -- 4:00 PM

Episode #11136

KQED 9: Tue, Jan 6, 2015 -- 3:00 PM

EBOLA - From launching new drug trials to building new clinics the United Nations and non-governmental organizations around the world are continuing their efforts to combat the Ebola epidemic in West Africa. Gwen Ifill discusses the situation with two men who have recently returned from the region - the outgoing head of the United Nations Mission for Ebola Emergency Response, Anthony Banbury, and Democratic Senator Chris Coons.
SOUTH OF THE BORDER - Mexican President Enrique Pe?a Nieto met with President Obama at the White House today. Although he campaigned as a reformer, the Mexican leader has recently been hammered by allegations of corruption. Judy Woodruff examines the challenges facing Pe?a Nieto with Carlos Bravo-Regidor, a political analyst at the Center for Research and Teaching of Economics, a think tank based in Mexico City.
BIRD'S EYE VIEW - In Peru, archaeologists are using the latest drone technology to protect the country's cultural heritage from encroaching development. Jeffrey Brown has the story as part of his ongoing series, "Culture at Risk."
CRACKING DOWN - Prescription drug abuse is a growing problem in the United States. Now, many states are pushing back with stricter laws and regulations. Some physicians and patient advocates argue that this crackdown is creating new problems. For two views on this issue, Judy Woodruff sits down with Dr. Andrew Kolodny, president of Physicians for Responsible Opioid Prescribing and chief medical officer of the Phoenix House Foundation, and Bob Twillman, executive director of the American Academy of Pain Management.
MAKING THE GRADE - The GED, or General Education Development Diploma, has long been an important high school equivalency credential. A recent overhaul of the GED exam has resulted in fewer people taking, and passing, the test, which has become both more rigorous and more expensive. Gwen Ifill explores the changes and their impact with Randy Trask, president and CEO of GED Testing Service, and Lecester Johnson, CEO of Academy of Hope, an adult charter school in Washington D.C.
PREVIEW: FRONTLINE-NRA - Tonight, FRONTLINE investigates the politics and power of the NRA. PBS NewsHour will air a brief excerpt of this documentary, which looks at the history and continuing influence of this organization. < br>NEWSHOUR SHARES - Kicking off a new series highlighting smaller news items that catch the eye of the PBS NewsHour team, we share a brief clip of Vice President Joe Biden swearing in members of Congress on Capitol Hill today.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Wed, Jan 7, 2015 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Tue, Jan 6, 2015 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED World: Tue, Jan 6, 2015 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Tue, Jan 6, 2015 -- 6:00 PM
  • KQED World: Tue, Jan 6, 2015 -- 4:00 PM

Episode #11135

KQED 9: Mon, Jan 5, 2015 -- 3:00 PM

BOSTON BOMBINGS - Jury selection began today in the trial of the man charged with the 2013 Boston Marathon bombings. Judy Woodruff debriefs with Phillip Martin, senior investigative reporter for WGBH-FM, who was in the courtroom today.
NO ENTRY - Straining under the weight of its refugee population, Lebanon is now requiring Syrians to obtain visas for entry into the country. Humanitarian groups worry the new policy will trap Syrians inside a war zone as they attempt to flee the violence in their native country. Gwen Ifill analyzes this development with chief foreign affairs correspondent Margaret Warner.
THE 114TH - Tomorrow, the United States will convene its 114th Congress, ushering in Republican control of both the House and the Senate. What does this mean and what issues are at the top of the agenda? Judy Woodruff explores these questions with David Boaz, executive vice president of the Libertarian organization, the Cato Institute, and Arkadi Gerney, senior vice president of the liberal-leaning Center for American Progress.
EURO TRASHED - The value of the Euro plunged to a 9-year low against the dollar today, renewing fears that the economic stability of Europe could be at risk. Jeffrey Brown examines the situation with Jacob Kirkegaard, a senior fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics, and Kenneth Rogoff, a professor of economics and public policy at Harvard University.
TRANSGENDER TEENS - The suicide last week of a transgender teenager in Ohio has drawn attention to the challenges young LGBT people face and prompted a national conversation on the subject. Hari Sreenivasan reports.
EDWARD BROOKE (1919-2015) - In 1966, Edward Brooke became the first African American popularly elected to the U.S. Senate. The former Senator died Saturday of natural causes at his home in Florida. He was 95 years old. Gwen Ifill discusses Brooke's life and his legacy with Boston Globe Columnist Adrian Walker, and presidential historian Richard Norton Smith, who worked as a speech writer for Brooke during his time in office.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Tue, Jan 6, 2015 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Mon, Jan 5, 2015 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED World: Mon, Jan 5, 2015 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Mon, Jan 5, 2015 -- 6:00 PM
  • KQED World: Mon, Jan 5, 2015 -- 4:00 PM

Episode #11134

KQED 9: Fri, Jan 2, 2015 -- 3:00 PM

DEADLY CROSSING - On one of the deadliest migration routes in the world, thousands of refugees fleeing war and poverty in North Africa and the Middle East have died boarding rickety, over-crowded boats to cross the Mediterranean Sea to Europe. Senior Advocate with Refugees International Daryl Grisgraber sits down with Hari Sreenivasan to discuss the startling trend of human smugglers abandoning these vessels filled with migrants before reaching European shores.
GETTING STARTED - The number of unaccompanied minors crossing into the U.S. from Central America has decreased following a surge earlier in 2014. A report from special NewsHour Correspondent Spencer Michels shows how the teens who made the journey are coping with the complicated transition into their new lives.
BIOLOGICAL BAD LUCK - When it comes to who does or doesn't get cancer, new research released this week indicates that chance may play a larger role than previously thought. NewsHour Correspondent Jeffrey Brown interviews Dr. Cristian Tomasetti from Johns Hopkins, one of the authors of the report.
MARIO CUOMO 1932-2015 - Former New York governor Mario Cuomo died Thursday at his home in New York City. Cuomo was governor for three terms from 1983-1994 and is the father of current New York governor Andrew Cuomo, who was sworn in for his second term the same day his father passed away. We look back on the life and career of Cuomo, from his humble beginning as the son of Italian immigrants to his political career championing liberal causes and social justice. < br>YEAR STARTER - The coming year is poised to bring more social, political and economic drama and debate for U.S. leaders. Political Director Domenico Montanaro brings us a political viewer's guide to 2015.
SHIELDS AND GERSON - Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and Washington Post columnist Michael Gerson join us to discuss some of the biggest stories from the past week and look ahead to the year in politics.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Sat, Jan 3, 2015 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Fri, Jan 2, 2015 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED World: Fri, Jan 2, 2015 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Fri, Jan 2, 2015 -- 6:00 PM
  • KQED World: Fri, Jan 2, 2015 -- 4:00 PM

Episode #11133

KQED World: Thu, Jan 1, 2015 -- 4:00 PM

JAILED JOURNALISTS - Today, an Egyptian court ordered a retrial of the case against Al Jazeera journalists Peter Greste, Mohamed Fahmy and Baher Mohamed, who were arrested by the Egyptian government in December 2013 and have now been held for more than a year on terrorism charges. Journalist Borzou Daragahi joins Hari Sreenivasan from Cairo, Egypt, to discuss the latest developments in the case. < br> PAY RAISE - With the coming of the New Year, new laws raising minimum wage took effect in 21 states across the country, meaning that a majority of states now require wages above the federal minimum of $7.25 an hour. To find out what the benefits and costs of raised minimum wage will be for workers and employers, Hari Sreenivasan sits down with Economists Jared Bernstein and Diana Furchtgott-Roth.
MARSHMALLOW TEST - In the inaugural report of our new weekly feature on business and finance, "Making Sense Thursday," Economics Correspondent Paul Solman takes a look at how to fulfill those burdensome New Year's resolutions.
GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE - The new and unique challenges the U.S. faced in 2014 will likely set the stage for what 2015 holds in terms of the political and economic landscape. Gwen Ifill discusses the global upheaval that marked much of the past year with President and CEO of the International Rescue Committee David Miliband, Washington Post Foreign Affairs Columnist David Ignatius and Foreign Policy Correspondent for Bloomberg News Indira Lakshmanan.
SOWETO GOLD - In the 20 years since Apartheid ended in South Africa, the country has continued to face many challenges concerning poverty and unemployment. NewsHour Special Correspondent Martin Seemungal reports on the often-ignored rising middle class in South Africa, and one entrepreneur hoping to make his fortune in brewing.
CHILEAN MINERS - The 2010 plight of the 33 miners trapped in a mine in Chile's Atacama Desert was closely followed around the world as the men waited for two months for rescue. Arts Correspondent Jeffrey Brown speaks to author Hector Tobar about his new book detailing the events surrounding the incident.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Fri, Jan 2, 2015 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Thu, Jan 1, 2015 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED World: Thu, Jan 1, 2015 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Thu, Jan 1, 2015 -- 6:00 PM

Episode #11132

KQED World: Thu, Jan 1, 2015 -- 12:00 AM

GUANTANAMO - The Pentagon announced today that five more detainees were released from Guantanamo Bay detention center. All told, 28 detainees have been moved from the facility this year - the most since 2009. However, 127 detainees still remain. Gwen Ifill debriefs with Carol Rosenberg, who reports on Guantanamo for the Miami Herald. RARE ATTENTION - The Rose Bowl is one of college football's biggest days. This year, it will be used to cast a spotlight on those diagnosed with a rare disease, Fanconi anemia, and their families. Hari Sreenivasan speaks with Dave and Lynn Frohnmayer, who started the Fanconi Anemia Research Fund after several of their children were diagnosed, and Dr. Marshall Summar of Children's National Hospital about the disease and efforts to find a cure.
BREAKTHROUGH - A website that uses a statistical approach to evaluate and rank different medical interventions is seeking to disrupt the way physicians practice medicine. Jackie Judd reports on the site, and the doctor who helped create it, as part of PBS NewsHour's "Breakthroughs" series.
2015 FORECAST - As we bid farewell to 2014, many are wondering what to expect in the year ahead. Hari Sreenivasan looks to the future with Helena Andrews, co-author of the Washington Post's "Reliable Source" and author of "Bitch is the New Black," Jeffrey Goldberg, a national correspondent for the Atlantic, and BuzzFeed White House reporter Evan McMorris Santoro.
BEST FILMS OF THE YEAR - Senior arts correspondent Jeffrey Brown sits down with film critics Mike Sargent of WBAI Radio and Slate's Dana Stevens to discuss their favorite films from 2014.

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TV Technical Issues

TV
    TV Technical Issues
    • KQED most channels, planned overnight maintenance: early Wed 1/14 midnight-3am

      (includes all DT9, DT54 and DT25 channels, along with most paid signal providers) We will be doing maintenance work in our Master Control area during the overnight hours of late Tues/early Wed 1/14. Work will begin shortly after midnight early Wednesday, and should be done in 2-3 hours, perhaps sooner. This will result in all […]

    • KQED all channels, planned overnight maintenance: early Fri 12/19 midnight-6am

      (this includes all DT9, DT54 and DT25 channels, along with all paid services) We will be doing upgrade and maintenance work in our Master Control area during the overnight hours of late Thurs/early Fri 12/19. Work will begin shortly after midnight early Friday, which may last until 6am, though we hope to finish earlier. This […]

    • KQED Plus OTA ? Optimistically planned maintenance: Fri 12/05 mid-morning

      (DT54.1 thru 54.5) Assuming that the weather and road conditions permit, we plan to do a bit of maintenance on our KQEH transmitter the morning of Friday 12/05… hopefully 10am-11am-ish, but could be a bit later. Most of the work should not affect the outgoing signal, but there will need to be a cable swap […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

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Channels 54, 54.1, 9.2 & 25.2 - Monterey
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XFINITY 190

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Channel 54.5 & 25.3
XFINITY 191 & 621

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Channel 54.4
XFINITY 192

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