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PBS NewsHour Previous Broadcasts

Episode #11616

KQED 9: Fri, Jul 22, 2016 -- 3:00 PM

* Munich | a shooting at a mall in Munich, Germany left at least nine people dead. Multiple gunmen opened fire at a McDonald's, authorities said. We report the latest on the situation.
* How The Deck Is Stacked | Rich in soil, music and culture, the Mississippi Delta is one of those unique regions that has come to hold a special place in the American imagination. But in terms of economic mobility and poverty, this stretch of land is far behind anywhere else in the developed world. Kai Ryssdal takes a look at the storied and complex history of the Mississippi Delta.
* Desperate Journey | The boat trip from North Africa to Italy has ended in death and heartbreak for many migrants. It has been especially tough on children, many of whom come by themselves. In the second of a three-part Desperate Journey series from the Mediterranean, Malcolm Brabant is aboard a Doctors Without Borders ship when one trip ends with promise of a new life in Europe.
* Shields and Brooks | Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks discuss the take-aways from the GOP convention and look ahead to the Democratic convention, next week in Philadelphia.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Sat, Jul 23, 2016 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Fri, Jul 22, 2016 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED World: Fri, Jul 22, 2016 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Fri, Jul 22, 2016 -- 6:00 PM
  • KQED World: Fri, Jul 22, 2016 -- 4:00 PM

Episode #11615

KQED 9: Thu, Jul 21, 2016 -- 3:00 PM

* Donald Trump prepares to accept his nomination for GOP presidential candidate, in the wake of his once-opponent Texas Sen. Ted Cruz's failure to endorse him.
* we speak with vice presidential nominee Mike Pence
* Roger Ailes resigns from Fox
* what will Turkey's state of emergency mean for the country?

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Fri, Jul 22, 2016 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Thu, Jul 21, 2016 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED World: Thu, Jul 21, 2016 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED World: Thu, Jul 21, 2016 -- 4:00 PM

Episode #11614

KQED 9: Wed, Jul 20, 2016 -- 3:00 PM

* Donald Trump and Mike Pence emerge as a united front at the Republican National Convention. Is the GOP ready to rally together behind the ticket?
* How Donald Trump got into politics
* defense chiefs gather for summit on fighting the Islamic State
* what the world can learn about defeating AIDS from a Kenyan island.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Thu, Jul 21, 2016 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Wed, Jul 20, 2016 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED World: Wed, Jul 20, 2016 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED World: Wed, Jul 20, 2016 -- 4:00 PM

Episode #11613

KQED 9: Tue, Jul 19, 2016 -- 3:00 PM

* Vote 2016 | Republicans will formally nominate Donald Trump as their presidential candidate Tuesday night. After the roll call of states, the convention will get down to business with its theme of jobs and the economy. But a speech by Melania Trump on Monday night has momentarily stolen the spotlight. John Yang reports and NPR's Rachel Martin offers a preview from the convention floor.
* Young Delegates | Both Republicans and Democrats are vying for the increasingly important demographic of young voters. Lisa Desjardins reports from Cleveland on why the GOP has had a difficult time recruiting millennials.
* RNC | Immigration is a central tenant of Donald Trump's domestic policy agenda and a topic of major division among Republicans. Judy Woodruff and Gwen Ifill get two views from Rep. Tom Marino, R-PA, and Daniel Garza of the Libre Initiative.
* Trump Bio | Just as Donald Trump was finishing business school, he set his sights on showbiz, investing in a Broadway production. But when that failed, he retreated to the family business of real estate, where he found success (as well as bankruptcy), climbed New York's social ladder and courted controversy. Gwen Ifill explores the career path that led Trump to pursue the Oval Office.
* Crisis In Turkey | Marcia Biggs reports from Istanbul, where around 3000 supporters of Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan were protesting in the street, demanding retribution for those responsible for the coup over the weekend. Today even more Turkish civil servants were suspended from their jobs and President Obama spoke on the phone with Erdogan.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Wed, Jul 20, 2016 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Tue, Jul 19, 2016 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED World: Tue, Jul 19, 2016 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED World: Tue, Jul 19, 2016 -- 4:00 PM

Episode #11612

KQED 9: Mon, Jul 18, 2016 -- 3:00 PM

* Politics Monday | On the first day of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Gwen Ifill and Judy Woodruff talk to syndicated columnist Mark Shields, New York Times columnist David Brooks and Amy Walter of The Cook Political Report.
* Baton Rouge | Another US city is mourning the fatal shootings of its police officers - this time 3 in Baton Rouge, La., which exploded in protest earlier this month when white cops killed Alton Sterling, a black man, outside a convenience store. The gunman, ex-Marine Gavin Long, had been ranting on social media that he was fed up with the treatment of blacks. .
* Turkey | Turkish president Recip Erdogan appears to have emerged from Friday's failed coup stronger, but the rule of secular law may suffer. Erdogan, who wants to increase the influence of Islamic law on the government, purged some 18,000 people, including judges, police and military personnel over the weekend and promised more. Marcia Biggs discusses the latest with Hari Sreenivasan.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Tue, Jul 19, 2016 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Mon, Jul 18, 2016 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED World: Mon, Jul 18, 2016 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED World: Mon, Jul 18, 2016 -- 4:00 PM

Episode #11611

KQED 9: Fri, Jul 15, 2016 -- 3:00 PM

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Sat, Jul 16, 2016 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Fri, Jul 15, 2016 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED World: Fri, Jul 15, 2016 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED World: Fri, Jul 15, 2016 -- 4:00 PM

Episode #11610

KQED 9: Thu, Jul 14, 2016 -- 3:00 PM

* End of AIDS? | Rwanda emerged from its 1994 genocide to build one of the most successful AIDS responses in Africa and is working mightily to halt mother-to-child HIV transmissions. They've done it with a mix of science, technology and "aggressive neighborliness." William Brangham reports with support from the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting for the fourth part of our series, "The End of AIDS? "
* Venezuela | Venezuela's hospitals are crumbling and health care system is in shambles. Kidnappers prey on citizens whose families are rich enough to pay ransom and the capital, Caracas, is the world's most murderous city. Food is scarce - and expensive. Falling oil prices have hit Caracas, a major exporter, especially hard. Nadja Drost and videographer Bruno Federico report from Caracas. * Making Sense | There's a growing move across the US to restrict, or even ban, employee non-compete agreements that bar workers to getting jobs with their bosses' competitors. Nearly 40% of all American workers have, at some point, signed such contracts, which critics say do something decidedly un-American: stifle competition. Duarte Geraldino reports.
* Brief But Spectacular | New York Times reporter Yamiche Alcindor reveals what it was like covering Bernie Sanders. There were surprising moments, like when he called on her first weekend off in ages to "talk." And then there was the time Sanders struggled to get an "Amen" at a South Carolina church where, for some, the buffet was priority. Alcindor gives her Brief but Spectacular take on her time on the campaign trail.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Fri, Jul 15, 2016 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Thu, Jul 14, 2016 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED World: Thu, Jul 14, 2016 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Thu, Jul 14, 2016 -- 6:00 PM
  • KQED World: Thu, Jul 14, 2016 -- 4:00 PM

Episode #11609

KQED 9: Wed, Jul 13, 2016 -- 3:00 PM

* Vote 2016 | The Republican veepstakes is drawing to a close and Donald Trump will reveal his "Apprentice" Friday. The candidate was still meeting Wednesday with potential running mates and found himself hitting back at his newest critic, Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, 83. "Her mind is shot," he said. Susan Page of USA Today and Robert Costa of The Washington Post join Judy Woodruff.
* End Of AIDS? | Nearly 1 in 10 Americans living with HIV live in New York, where an ambitious plan aims to cut new infections and HIV-related deaths. But it has serious challenges, including keeping people on their meds, and stopping the spread among IV drug users. William Brangham reports with support from the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting in the third installment of our "The End of AIDS?" series.
* Leading Edge | It was an unprecedented meeting of the minds and it all came together in April at Harvard Medical School. The subject? Medical cannabis. Science correspondent Miles O'Brien reports.
* Cleveland Public Space | Just in time for next week's Republican convention, Cleveland has unveiled a $50 million renovation of its historic, 10-acre Public Square in the city's downtown. The landscape architect was James Corner, the same man behind New York City's celebrated High Line. The square is sure to be the site of expected protests next week. Corner says it's ready. Jeffrey Brown reports from Cleveland.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Thu, Jul 14, 2016 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Wed, Jul 13, 2016 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED World: Wed, Jul 13, 2016 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Wed, Jul 13, 2016 -- 6:00 PM
  • KQED World: Wed, Jul 13, 2016 -- 4:00 PM

Episode #11608

KQED 9: Tue, Jul 12, 2016 -- 3:00 PM

* South China Sea | China is rejecting a ruling by an international tribunal that its claim to a huge expanse of the South China Sea is invalid. The dispute was a victory for the Philippines and other nations that also hold claims to the waters around the Spratly Islands, a major fishing, trade and energy production corridor. Judy Woodruff talks to Bonnie Glaser of the Center for Strategic and International Studies.
* Vote 2016 | The signs heralding Bernie Sanders' endorsement of presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton read "Stronger Together" - but the "together" only came after a bruising campaign and intense party platform wrangling. Gwen Ifill talks with Sanders supporter, former Ohio state senator Nina Turner; and former Vermont Gov. and presidential candidate Howard Dean, a Clinton backer.
* End Of AIDS? | The epicenter of the AIDS epidemic in America is Atlanta and the southeast, and the hardest hit population is gay and bisexual black men. According to the CDC, half of them will be diagnosed with HIV in their lifetimes if current trends continue. William Brangham reports with support from the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting in the second part of the NewsHour's "The End of AIDS?"
* After The Shootings | The image was stark as President Barack Obama tried to comfort a country still reeling from days of bloodshed, protest and racial tension. Five chairs, holding flags and police caps, to represent the five officers killed by a sniper's bullets. In eulogizing the fallen, Obama also made the case that racism, institutional and otherwise, is real - and cannot be dismissed. Judy Woodruff reports.
* Making The Grade | The 2016 election mudslinging from "crooked" Hillary Clinton and "dangerously incoherent" Donald Trump has even piqued the interest of teens - and made teaching high school civics that much more difficult. So it's time to get creative, which one 12th grade government teacher has done with his 'scandals, lies and incivility' curriculum. Education Week's Lisa Stark reports for the NewsHour.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Wed, Jul 13, 2016 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Tue, Jul 12, 2016 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED World: Tue, Jul 12, 2016 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Tue, Jul 12, 2016 -- 6:00 PM
  • KQED World: Tue, Jul 12, 2016 -- 4:00 PM

Episode #11607

KQED 9: Mon, Jul 11, 2016 -- 3:00 PM

* End of AIDS? | There's still no vaccine and no cure, but the medical community is increasingly focused on ambitious plans to bring about an end to HIV/AIDS. The NewsHour launches its series, "The End of AIDS?" with a look at intense prevention efforts underway in one of the cities most impacted by the epidemic, San Francisco. William Brangham reports with support from the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting.
* Police Shootings | President Barack Obama will be in Dallas Tuesday for an interfaith service to mourn the five police officers cut down in last week's sniper ambush. The killings have done little to muffle growing national protests against police violence as rallies, marches and human roadblocks spread from cities like New York and Baton Rouge to St. Paul and Memphis. Gwen Ifill reports.
* Politics Monday | Trump-Gingrich? Clinton-Kaine? Clinton-Warren? Trump-Christie? The political soothsayers are looking closely at every appearance Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton make with potential running mates. Also in the news: Bernie Sanders on Tuesday is expected to finally endorse the former secretary of state. Gwen Ifill talks with Tamara Keith of NPR and Amy Walter of The Cook Political Report.
* NATO | Russia's game-changing moves in the Ukraine and new aggressive posture against NATO were the focus of a NewsHour series last week looking at the fault lines between Moscow and the West. Over the weekend, President Barack Obama and other leaders of the alliance met in Poland. John Yang learns more from former State Department official Esther Brimmer.
* NewsHour Shares | In our moment of the day, we take a look - and listen - to the moving rendition of Leonard Cohen's "Hallelujah" by Rufus Wainwright and 1500 singers from Toronto's "Choir! Choir! Choir!" group. A video of the performance, inside the city's Hearn Generating Station, was recently posted to the group's YouTube page.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Tue, Jul 12, 2016 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Mon, Jul 11, 2016 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED World: Mon, Jul 11, 2016 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Mon, Jul 11, 2016 -- 6:00 PM
  • KQED World: Mon, Jul 11, 2016 -- 4:00 PM

Episode #11606

KQED 9: Fri, Jul 8, 2016 -- 3:00 PM

* Dallas | The sniper slayings of 5 Dallas police officers have reverberated around the nation - and the world. In Poland, President Barack Obama said the FBI is on the case. Rep. John Lewis, D-GA, said the nation's "leaders must lead" America out of this dark period. And Attorney General Loretta Lynch made a plea for the violence not to be "a new normal." Hari Sreenivasan reports from Dallas.
* Dallas | Jeffrey Brown talks to Michael Eric Dyson of Georgetown University, Dallas Police Deputy Chief Malik Aziz and Milwaukee Police Chief Edward Flynn.
* Clinton on Dallas | Presumptive presidential nominee Hillary Clinton joins Judy Woodruff to offer remarks and answer questions on last night's shooting in Dallas.
* Shields and Brooks | Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks join Judy Woodruff to discuss the week's news. * Fault Lines | Russia's 2014 annexation of Crimea radically changed the calculus between the West and Russia that has defined the last 25 years. NATO is now trying to reassure a nervous Eastern European and deter Moscow from new aggression. This level of tension hasn't been felt in a generation. With the help of the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting, Nick Schifrin reports from Poland.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Sat, Jul 9, 2016 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Fri, Jul 8, 2016 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED World: Fri, Jul 8, 2016 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Fri, Jul 8, 2016 -- 6:00 PM
  • KQED World: Fri, Jul 8, 2016 -- 4:00 PM

Episode #11605

KQED 9: Thu, Jul 7, 2016 -- 3:00 PM

* Police Shootings | The police shooting of an African American man in Minnesota - and the disturbing live video that captured part of the aftermath -- led to another day of anger, distress and serious questions. Hari Sreenivasan is joined by Jelani Cobb of the New Yorker and David Klinger of the University of Missouri-St. Louis.
* Clinton Emails | The firestorm over Hillary Clinton's past email practices found a new stage today with the House Oversight Committee. Lisa Desjardins reports.
* Zero Days | "Zero Days," a new documentary by Alex Gibney, lays out a sobering view of the rise of cyber warfare and its acceleration since intelligence agencies sabotaged Iran's nuclear program. Gibney sits down with Jeffrey Brown. * Brief But Spectacular | Comedian and actor Jim Gaffigan says he knew immediately that his life had changed the first time he got up on stage and made fun of himself. He gives his BBS take on comedy as a profession.
* Fault Lines | Estonia is one of the smallest countries in NATO, and one of its most committed members. And it needs that alliance now more than ever. After 25 years of independence, Estonians have watched in horror as Russian soldiers helped destabilize Eastern Ukraine, fearing their country will be next. Nick Schifrin reports in partnership with the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Fri, Jul 8, 2016 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Thu, Jul 7, 2016 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED World: Thu, Jul 7, 2016 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Thu, Jul 7, 2016 -- 6:00 PM
  • KQED World: Thu, Jul 7, 2016 -- 4:00 PM

Episode #11604

KQED 9: Wed, Jul 6, 2016 -- 3:00 PM

* Police Shooting | Another police shooting has spurred a civil rights investigation by the Justice Department. In Baton Rouge, Louisiana, Alton Sterling was shot by an officer responding to a disturbance call. A cellphone video led many to ask whether the shooting was justified.
* The Longest War | The Obama administration revised up the number of troops it plans to keep in Afghanistan by the end of the year, with a current force of in order to respond to increased threats from the Taliban. Hari Sreenivasan learns more from Seth Jones of the RAND Corporation.
* Vote 2016 |Hillary Clinton campaigned on the Jersey shore Wednesday, confronting Donald Trump's business record and unveiling a plan to make public universities tuition free for most American families. But Republicans continued to raise concerns about her use of email as secretary of state, a day after FBI Director James Comey said he wasn't recommending criminal charges. Lisa Desjardins reports.
* Fault Lines | Ukraine is waging two wars: one against Russian-backed separatists in the East and one against its own internal corruption. Nick Schifrin, in partnership with the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting, begins his report in Odessa, where there have been efforts to clean up a police force with ties to the mafia.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Thu, Jul 7, 2016 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Wed, Jul 6, 2016 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED World: Wed, Jul 6, 2016 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Wed, Jul 6, 2016 -- 6:00 PM
  • KQED World: Wed, Jul 6, 2016 -- 4:00 PM

Episode #11603

KQED 9: Tue, Jul 5, 2016 -- 3:00 PM

* Clinton Emails | FBI Director James Comey spoke today after a year-long investigation into the use of Hillary Clinton's private email server when she served as the nation's top diplomat. Comey did not recommend any criminal charges be brought against her or her colleagues, but did say that Clinton and her colleagues were "extremely careless" in their handling of classified information. We'll have the latest.
* Fault Lines | In Eastern Ukraine, there's supposed to be a cease-fire, but the fighting starts every night. For two years, soldiers for the self-proclaimed Donetsk People's Republic - with the backing of Russia - have fought the Ukrainian government to gain autonomy. Nick Schifrin reports from the front lines, in partnership with the Pulitzer Center for Crisis Reporting.
* Making The Grade | As kindergarten and pre-k have become more academically rigorous, some worry that the very youngest students may be missing out on crucial development through abundant playtime. But other educators believe setting high expectations for achievement helps kids, especially low-income students, excel. Cat Wise reports.
* Harry Potter | At London's Palace Theater, fans of J.K. Rowling can leap back into her now-familiar magical world of a certain boy wizard. In "Harry Potter and the Cursed Child," a new stage play told in two parts, Harry is back, but older and with children of his own. Jeffrey Brown reports.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Wed, Jul 6, 2016 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Tue, Jul 5, 2016 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED World: Tue, Jul 5, 2016 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Tue, Jul 5, 2016 -- 6:00 PM
  • KQED World: Tue, Jul 5, 2016 -- 4:00 PM

Episode #11602

KQED 9: Mon, Jul 4, 2016 -- 3:00 PM

Three attacks by the Islamic State in three countries have killed more than 200 people in the last few days. Also: More campaign controversies for Clinton and Trump, finding the line between political straight talk and offensiveness, medical marijuana for NFL players, how a slave helped create Jack Daniel's, another great summer read and reflections on true American heroes.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Tue, Jul 5, 2016 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Mon, Jul 4, 2016 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED World: Mon, Jul 4, 2016 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Mon, Jul 4, 2016 -- 6:00 PM
  • KQED World: Mon, Jul 4, 2016 -- 4:00 PM

Episode #11601

KQED 9: Fri, Jul 1, 2016 -- 3:00 PM

* Airstrikes | For the first time, the Obama administration has released the number of enemy combatants and civilians killed in drone attacks and airstrikes in some countries. The President also issued an executive order aimed at reducing civilian casualties. John Yang talks with Naureen Shah of Amnesty International USA and Sarah Holewinski, former executive director of the Center for Civilians in Conflict.
* Fight In Iraq | Displaced residents of Fallujah are finding little to celebrate after Iraqi forces finally ousted Islamic State fighters this week. The city is empty - tens of thousands who were held by ISIS as human shields fled to desolate camps - and there is no electricity or water. Refugee workers call the situation a "catastrophe" and are hoping for more aid. Jane Arraf reports.
* Brexit | Immigrants and minorities in post-Brexit Britain are living in fear, reporting an uptick in xenophobic attacks that some are blaming on the immigrant scapegoating of the Leave movement. In Hammersmith, a Polish war memorial and a cultural center were vandalized and anti-Muslim pamphlets are making the rounds in Birmingham, where a Halal butcher was firebombed. Hari Sreenivasan reports from London.
* Essay | Make sure you cover up this summer - with sunscreen. But your chick lit, schlocky novels, and frivolous fiction? No way, says writer Jennifer Weiner summer reading in her NewsHour essay. Embrace the F-word this Fourth of July, she says. Not just "freedom" but "fun." Because there is no shame in making summer reading just that.
* Summer Reading | It was a photo of Ernest Hemingway sitting with a mischievous-looking group in Pamplona, Spain that inspired Lesley M. M. Blume's new book, "Everybody Behaves Badly. " It was 1925, a year before Hemingway's masterpiece, "The Sun Also Rises," hit. The group was a volatile mix, complete with fights and sexual rivalries that gave the novelist some of his best material, Blume tells Jeffrey Brown.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Sat, Jul 2, 2016 -- 12:00 AM
  • KQED World: Fri, Jul 1, 2016 -- 10:00 PM
  • KQED World: Fri, Jul 1, 2016 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Fri, Jul 1, 2016 -- 6:00 PM
  • KQED World: Fri, Jul 1, 2016 -- 4:00 PM

Episode #11562

KQED World: Fri, Jul 1, 2016 -- 12:00 AM

* Ban Lifted | The Pentagon has lifted its ban on transgender troops in another victory for LGBT rights. Defense Secretary Ash Carter announced the move Thursday. Hari Sreenivasan talks with John Yang about the historic change.
* Terror In Turkey | As the Turks went about the sad task of burying the victims of the Istanbul airport terror attack, civilian fears mounted and calls increased for Ankara to act against ISIS. Turkey's president, Recep Tayyip Erdogan, has been criticized for turning a blind eye to the so-called jihadi highway - the Islamic State's use of Turkey to get recruits into Syria. Jane Ferguson reports.
* Making Sen$e | When it comes to luxury items, consumer minds are likely to think about some of the world's fashion meccas. Think Paris. Milan. New York. But Detroit? One growing company would like to think so. With its line of watches, bikes, bags and other items, Shinola is aiming to have the Motor City known for more than its cars and financial woes. Roben Farzad reports. * Brief But Spectacular | Comedian Tig Notaro lost her mother, ended a long-term relationship and got diagnosed with breast cancer all in the same year. It was, she says, more than she could handle, but it also spurred a writing spree that helped her cope with her illness. Notaro offers her Brief but Spectacular take on healing through comedy.
* Summer Reading | Nathalia Holt is the author of "Rise of the Rocket Girls," an examination of the unsung women heroes behind the scenes of America's space program. Holt talked with Jeffrey Brown at the Los Angeles Book Festival.

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    • Mon 6/13: RESOLVED ? KQED Plus (KQEH) Transmitter Off the Air (DT54.1 through 54.5)

      UPDATE: The signal was restored apx 5pm Monday. Most TVs will have recovered the signal on their own, but some viewers may need to do a rescan in order to re-acquire the signal. – – – – – – – – – – – – Our KQEH transmitter in the San Jose area has suffered […]

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      (DT54-1 through 54-5) Monday 5/09 The DT54 Over the Air signal will need to switch from main to auxiliary levels at some point Monday (most likely early afternoon) for the safety of the crew working on another station’s equipment on the tower, then back to the main antenna late-afternoon when work is completed. The change […]

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