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American Masters Previous Broadcasts

Sister Rosetta Tharpe: The Godmother of Rock & Roll (Episode #2602H)

KQED World: Wed, Feb 27, 2013 -- 2:00 AM

During the 1940s, 50s and 60s, Southern-born, Chicago-raised and New York-made Sister Rosetta Tharpe introduced the spiritual passion of her gospel music into the secular world of popular rock 'n roll, inspiring the male icons of the genre. This flamboyant African-American gospel superstar, with her spectacular virtuosity on the newly electrified guitar, was a natural-born performer and a rebel - one of the most important singer-musicians of the 20th century. She is acknowledged as a major influence not only on generations of black musicians - including Chuck Berry, Little Richard, Isaac Hayes and Etta James - but also on white stars such as Elvis Presley, Jerry Lee Lewis, Carl Perkins and Johnny Cash.

Sam Cooke: Crossing Over (Episode #2208H)

KQED Life: Sat, Feb 23, 2013 -- 7:00 PM

Sam Cooke put the spirit of the black church into popular music -- creating a new sound and setting into motion a chain of events that forever altered the course of popular music and race relations in America. With "You Send Me" in 1957, Cooke became the first African American artist to reach #1 on both the R&B and the pop charts. He proved with his pop/gospel hybrid, that it was, indeed, possible to win over white teenage listeners and keep his faithful church followers intact. In combining two worlds, his constant challenge was to sing meaningful lyrics with the fervor of gospel and the romance of pop. He came closest with "Chain Gang," observed and written during the Civil Rights era and with the poignant, biting lyrics and melody of "A Change Is Gonna Come" in 1962, fashioned out of the depth of personal pain and loss. He had the courage to take an open stand against racism, refusing to perform at a segregated venue in the south and garnering the support of Dick Clark. But, at the height of his success in 1964, he was gunned down and killed in the company of a prostitute -- leaving a profound legacy filled with extraordinary talent -- and all the questions about what might have been. This documentary includes original interviews with Lou Rawls, James Brown, Sam Moore, Bobby Womack, Smokey Robinson, Mel Carter, Herb Alpert, Lou Adler and James Carter, among many others from both sides of the crossover music world, then and now.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED Life: Tue, Feb 26, 2013 -- 1:00 AM
  • KQED Life: Mon, Feb 25, 2013 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED Life: Sun, Feb 24, 2013 -- 1:00 AM

Sister Rosetta Tharpe: The Godmother of Rock & Roll (Episode #2602H)

KQED 9: Fri, Feb 22, 2013 -- 10:00 PM

During the 1940s, 50s and 60s, Southern-born, Chicago-raised and New York-made Sister Rosetta Tharpe introduced the spiritual passion of her gospel music into the secular world of popular rock 'n roll, inspiring the male icons of the genre. This flamboyant African-American gospel superstar, with her spectacular virtuosity on the newly electrified guitar, was a natural-born performer and a rebel - one of the most important singer-musicians of the 20th century. She is acknowledged as a major influence not only on generations of black musicians - including Chuck Berry, Little Richard, Isaac Hayes and Etta James - but also on white stars such as Elvis Presley, Jerry Lee Lewis, Carl Perkins and Johnny Cash.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED 9: Sat, Feb 23, 2013 -- 4:00 AM

Cab Calloway: Sketches (Episode #2502)

KQED Life: Mon, Feb 18, 2013 -- 7:00 PM

"Hi de hi de hi de ho," the popular refrain from "Minnie the Moocher" was Cab Calloway's signature song and Harlem's famous Cotton Club was his home stage. A singer, dancer and band leader, Calloway was an exceptional figure in the history of jazz -- a consummate musician, he charmed audiences across the world with boundless energy, bravado and elegant showmanship. His back glide dance step is the precursor to Michael Jackson's moonwalk and his scatting lyrics find their legacy in today's hip-hop and rap. An ambassador for his race, Calloway was the first black musician to tour the segregationist South, as early as 1932. At the top of his game in the jazz and swing eras of the 30s and 40s, he toured as Sportin' Life in Porgy and Bess, forever putting his personal stamp on "It Ain't Necessarily So." His career flagged until he was rediscovered in the 1980s Blues Brothers and even on Sesame Street, becoming a new cult hero of sorts.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED Life: Tue, Feb 19, 2013 -- 1:00 AM

Sam Cooke: Crossing Over (Episode #2208H)

KQED 9: Fri, Feb 15, 2013 -- 10:00 PM

Sam Cooke put the spirit of the black church into popular music -- creating a new sound and setting into motion a chain of events that forever altered the course of popular music and race relations in America. With "You Send Me" in 1957, Cooke became the first African American artist to reach #1 on both the R&B and the pop charts. He proved with his pop/gospel hybrid, that it was, indeed, possible to win over white teenage listeners and keep his faithful church followers intact. In combining two worlds, his constant challenge was to sing meaningful lyrics with the fervor of gospel and the romance of pop. He came closest with "Chain Gang," observed and written during the Civil Rights era and with the poignant, biting lyrics and melody of "A Change Is Gonna Come" in 1962, fashioned out of the depth of personal pain and loss. He had the courage to take an open stand against racism, refusing to perform at a segregated venue in the south and garnering the support of Dick Clark. But, at the height of his success in 1964, he was gunned down and killed in the company of a prostitute -- leaving a profound legacy filled with extraordinary talent -- and all the questions about what might have been. This documentary includes original interviews with Lou Rawls, James Brown, Sam Moore, Bobby Womack, Smokey Robinson, Mel Carter, Herb Alpert, Lou Adler and James Carter, among many others from both sides of the crossover music world, then and now.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED Life: Tue, Feb 26, 2013 -- 1:00 AM
  • KQED Life: Mon, Feb 25, 2013 -- 7:00 PM
  • KQED Life: Sun, Feb 24, 2013 -- 1:00 AM
  • KQED 9: Sun, Feb 17, 2013 -- 1:00 PM
  • KQED 9: Sat, Feb 16, 2013 -- 4:00 AM
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TV Technical Issues

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    • KQED DT9 planned, very short outages, Tues 4/15 (& possibly Wed 4/16)

      (DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3) KQED DT9′s Over the Air (OTA) signal from Sutro Tower will experience a few extremely brief outages on Tuesday 4/15 between 10am and 5pm (and possibly on Wed 4/16 if the work cannot be completed in 1 day). Each outage should be measurable in seconds (not minutes). This work will not affect […]

    • KQET DT25 Planned Outage: early Tues 4/15 (btwn 5am-6am)

      (DT 25.1, 25.2, 25.3) At some point between 5am and 6am early Tuesday 4/15, KQET’s signal from the transmitter on Fremont Peak northeast of Monterey will shut down for a short period of time to allow AT&T to do work on our fiber interface. The outage should be relatively short, but its precise start time […]

    • Occasional sound issues, Comcast Cable, Black remote control

      Originally posted 6/19/2013: Some Comcast Basic Cable customers around the Bay Area have reported audio issues with KQED and KQED Plus, on channels 9 and 10. The problem is not related to KQED’s transmission but may be caused by the language setting on your Comcast remote control. If your Comcast remote control is black, please […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

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