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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Saturday, September 6, 2014

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, September 6, 2014
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#11049] NATO - Ukrainian president Petro Poroshenko announced a cease-fire agreement outside of the NATO summit in Wales today. Today marked the close of the two-day summit, which was dominated by talks of the crisis in Ukraine and the Islamic State militant group. Jeffrey Brown discusses the summit with Nicholas Burns, a former US ambassador to NATO who is now a professor at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government, Michael McFaul, a former US ambassador to Russia who is now a professor at Stanford University, and John Mearsheimer, a professor of political science at the University of Chicago.
    JOBS REPORT - The latest jobs report came in below expectations despite economists' predictions of a solid month of hiring in August. Economics correspondent Paul Solman has the story as part of his on-going reporting on "Making Sen$e" of financial news.
    SHIELDS &BROOKS - Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and the New York Times' David Brooks analyze this week's top stories.
    GUNS & POETRY - In a tragic accident, a 9-year-old girl shot and killed her instructor at a gun range last week. This shocking event raised questions about how people, especially children, cope with fatal accidents. Poet Gregory Orr reflects on this in a poem he wrote about accidentally killing his own brother in a gun accident at the age of 12.
    JOAN RIVERS - Comedian Joan Rivers died yesterday at a hospital in New York at the age of 81. Judy Woodruff explores the life and legacy of one of the pioneers for women in comedy.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#33178] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#3284] Tavis talks with Brown University Africana studies professor Dr. Tricia Rose. The internationally respected scholar offers her take on the aftermath of the police shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, MO. Tavis also chats with producer, composer, keyboardist and vocalist Sergio Mendes, who reflects on his influence on the music industry, his collaborations and his mediums and talks about his latest projects. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Secrets of the Dead [#1103] China's Terracotta Warriors The extraordinary story of China's 8,000 terracotta warriors begins two centuries before the birth of Christ. The First Emperor of China was preparing an extravagant tomb for his journey into the afterlife, and decreed that he be protected forever by a monumental army. But how was a terracotta army of this size made in less than two years using the technology of 2200 years ago? Led by archaeologist Agnes Hsu, the investigation shows that the Chinese may have used assembly lines to produce the 8,000-strong terracotta army. After the revelation of what the army really looked like when it was buried, archaeologists use biometric analysis to find out if these clay soldiers were individually modeled on living men. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG-V (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1801] HEROIN AND THE FAITH COMMUNITY - According to the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy, heroine abuse has reached "epidemic" levels across the country in both cities and small towns. Prominent evangelical leader Reverend Richard Cizik lost his son Richard Jr. to an overdose last year. Now he is pushing faith communities to get more involved by first acknowledging that heroine abuse is happening in their own churches. The acting director of the White House office, Michael Botticelli, also shares what role he believes faith groups can play in the crisis. "There is such a redemptive piece to recovery, and faith and spirituality has played a really pivotal role, in that recovery," says Botticelli. "We know that faith leaders can also, not only help us prevent the issue, but support people with addiction."
    WORLD WITHOUT HATE - Days after 9/11, Rais Bhuiyan was shot in the head by Mark Stroman in a hate crime targeted at Arabs. Bhuiyan survived the attack, and Stroman was sentenced to death, but Bhuiyan felt compelled by God to show love and compassion for his assailant. "I realize that I need to forgive him in public and do something to save the life," says Bhuiyan, "because I strongly believed that if Mark Stroman was given the chance, the opportunity which I had in my childhood, he would have become a different person." Bhuiyan forgave Stroman many times, even seconds before his execution, and says he believes he saw a change in the man that once tried to kill him. Now he has made teaching mercy and forgiveness his life's work.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1111H] Better Investors WT explores how to become a better investor and have fun doing it. The Motley Fool's Co-Founder Tom Gardner shares the online investment advisory service's 20 years of market-beating experience. Guest: Tom Gardner, Co-Founder, CEO and "Head Fool," The Motley Fool. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 4:00 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2326] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:30 am
    Asian Voices [#310] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    Cuban Missile Crisis: Three Men Go to War This film tells the inside story of the Cuban Missile Crisis, exploring how in October 1962 the earth teetered on the very brink of nuclear holocaust. The documentary brings to life the three central characters John F. Kennedy, Fidel Castro and Nikita Khrushchev, and explores how the world's most powerful men fell into an abyss of their own making and what courage and luck it took to climb out again. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    The Fidel Castro Tapes This program takes viewers on a journey like none other. It uses only news and documentary footage - past and present - to detail the life and times of one of the most controversial political figures of the 20th Century. There is no narration in this film and no interviews. Instead, the film relies solely on the words of journalists who covered the major events in Castro's life to tell the story. It is a unique approach, one that gives the viewer a chance to experience the life and times of Cuba's leader as if they were actually living through them. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1801] HEROIN AND THE FAITH COMMUNITY - According to the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy, heroine abuse has reached "epidemic" levels across the country in both cities and small towns. Prominent evangelical leader Reverend Richard Cizik lost his son Richard Jr. to an overdose last year. Now he is pushing faith communities to get more involved by first acknowledging that heroine abuse is happening in their own churches. The acting director of the White House office, Michael Botticelli, also shares what role he believes faith groups can play in the crisis. "There is such a redemptive piece to recovery, and faith and spirituality has played a really pivotal role, in that recovery," says Botticelli. "We know that faith leaders can also, not only help us prevent the issue, but support people with addiction."
    WORLD WITHOUT HATE - Days after 9/11, Rais Bhuiyan was shot in the head by Mark Stroman in a hate crime targeted at Arabs. Bhuiyan survived the attack, and Stroman was sentenced to death, but Bhuiyan felt compelled by God to show love and compassion for his assailant. "I realize that I need to forgive him in public and do something to save the life," says Bhuiyan, "because I strongly believed that if Mark Stroman was given the chance, the opportunity which I had in my childhood, he would have become a different person." Bhuiyan forgave Stroman many times, even seconds before his execution, and says he believes he saw a change in the man that once tried to kill him. Now he has made teaching mercy and forgiveness his life's work.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#335H] Elizabeth Warren, Fighting Back against the Wall Street Giants In Oklahoma, Elizabeth Warren and her brothers grew up in "an America that invested in kids like us and helped build a future where we could flourish." But she writes in her book, A Fighting Chance, "Today the game is rigged - rigged to work for those who have money and power. The optimism that defines us as a people has been beaten and bruised. It doesn't have to be this way."
    Now the senior US senator from Massachusetts, Elizabeth Warren speaks with Bill Moyers on this week's edition. The former Harvard Law School professor is an expert on how Wall Street and the banking industry are destroying the middle class and has put that knowledge to powerful use on Capitol Hill. Senator Warren has rapidly become the most authoritative and articulate voice of the progressive wing of the Democratic Party. Many are urging her to run for president.
    "This is a fight over economics, a fight over privilege, a fight over power," she told the Netroots Nation conference in July. "But deep down it is a fight over values. Conservatives and their powerful friends will continue to be guided by their internal motto, 'I've got mine. The rest of you are on your own.' Well, we're guided by principle, and it's a pretty simple idea. We all do better when we work together and invest in building a future."
    Senator Elizabeth Warren has authored or co-authored ten books and is credited with envisioning and developing the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), which came into being with the passage of the Dodd-Frank banking reform bill. She was chair of the TARP Congressional Oversight Panel during the recent financial meltdown and senior advisor to the National Bankruptcy Review Commission.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 8:00 am
    Global 3000 [#636] duration 26:00   STEREO
  • 8:30 am
    Focus On Europe [#3236] France: Jihadist Fighters Increasing France: appeal of extremism - More and more young people from Europe are fighting with Islamists in Syria and Iraq. Many were recruited by militant networks and preachers. In France, hundreds of young people have already joined the jihadist fighters. The majority come from non-religious families. Many were first approached by Islamists who claimed to be social workers, while others were recruited over the internet. More than 700 young French men and women have already heeded the call to go to Syria. When they arrive, they find themselves confronted with a reality that is more violent and brutal than they had anticipated. Only a few manage to leave the militant fold - and others die in the civil war. Greece: misery of illegal migrant workers - Thousands of undocumented seasonal laborers work in Greece, among them many from Bangladesh. On the Peloponnese, they work for starvation wages harvesting strawberries and potatoes, often under conditions akin to modern-day slavery. Last year, 28 Bangladeshi strawberry pickers were shot and wounded by their foremen for demanding months of unpaid wages owed to them. The Greek courts acquitted the farmers who admitted to the shooting. Greek human rights activists say that racism against Asian migrant workers is to blame. But without legal work permits, their desperate circumstances will likely continue. Romania: illegal logging in Carpathians - In the Romanian region of Carpathians, centuries-old trees are being logged illegally. Over the past decade, about 3,000 hectares of ancient forest have disappeared. Even in the famous national parks such as Maramures Park in northern Romania, enormous tracts of land have been logged bare. The lumber is sold for industrial use. Corrupt officials work closely with the logging mafia and the illegal loggers operate with near impunity. Large wood-processing enterprises in the region claim they careful to ensure that all the timber they use has been legally harvested. But conservationists are skeptical of this claim. They argue that the wood-processing industry's negligence in monitoring the source of the wood they use is what allows illegal logging to thrive. Germany: autobahn and bratwurst - The car - and the autobahn - are still king in Germany. And every autobahn needs a rest stop, of course. But there's one rest stop in the state of Thuringen that's rather unusual. It's home to what was Germany's oldest autobahn snack shop. Then the authorities built a fence between it and the autobahn, saying that road traffic regulations don't allow food to be served at that rest stop. Despite the threat of fines, the proprietor continues to serve bratwurst over the fence to hungry motorists. duration 26:10   STEREO TVG
  • 9:00 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5409H] The expanding threat of Islamic State (ISIL) extremists in Iraq and Syria and Russian President Vladimir Putin's continued aggression in Ukraine are dominating the NATO summit underway in Wales.
    Following the second beheading of an American journalist at the hands of ISIL, President Obama announced that the US strategy is to build an international coalition to "degrade and destroy" the jihadist group. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel said this week that more than 100 Americans are fighting with ISIL. This was the first time Hagel put an estimate on US citizens aiding the terrorist group.
    Meanwhile, many NATO leaders including President Obama believe Russia should be punished for its incursion into eastern Ukraine. The United States and European Union are expected to announce new sanctions against Russia on Friday that will expand current restrictions on the country's banking, energy and defense sectors. Also, the Pentagon has announced that 200 US troops are headed to western Ukraine to participate in exercises next week. This would mark the first time American ground troops have entered Ukraine since the crisis began. < br>What role should the US and NATO play in resolving the growing threat of ISIL as well as the continuing crisis in Ukraine? Joining us with analysis of the military strategies as well as the political implications: John Harwood of CNBC and The New York Times; Indira Lakshmanan of Bloomberg News; Yochi Dreazen of Foreign Policy Magazine; Peter Baker of The New York Times; and John Dickerson of Slate Magazine and CBS News .
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:30 am
    KQED NEWSROOM [#141H] Gubernatorial Debate, Freshmen Lawmakers & Fall Arts Preview
    Gubernatorial Debate Gets Contentious
    As election season officially begins, our panel delves into California politics and reviews the only scheduled gubernatorial debate before the November 4 election between Gov. Jerry Brown and his Republican opponent, Neel Kashkari. The three-term governor has more money in his campaign chest and a solid lead over political newcomer Kashkari. The two sparred Thursday over education, the economy, high-speed rail and immigration reform.

    Guests:
    • John Myers, KQED News
    • Carla Marinucci, San Francisco Chronicle
    • Corey Cook, University of San Francisco

    Further Reporting:
    Analysis: Impact of Brown-Kashkari Debate ... Debatable
    Video: Brown and Kashkari Spar in Heated Gubernatorial Debate

    Freshmen Lawmakers May Create Change
    The freshman class of California legislators is the largest since 1966, the year Ronald Reagan beat Pat Brown for governor. They were elected in 2012, the same year voters relaxed term limits and after new primary rules and political redistricting procedures took effect. As a result, these lawmakers are making an effort to get along, which could lead to real change. At the close of the legislative session, John Myers, Senior Editor of the KQED Politics and Government Desk hears from Assemblymembers on both sides of the aisle -- Democrats Marc Levine and Susan Eggman and Republican Melissa Melendez -- about the new political climate in the state capital.

    Fall Arts Preview With "The Do List" Co-Host Cy Musiker
    It's September, and theaters, dance companies, music organizations, museums, galleries and artists around the Bay Area are rolling out their schedules of upcoming offerings. We look at what the fall arts season brings -- from Brandi Clark to the Batsheva Dance Company. Cy Musiker, co-host of KQED's weekly arts calendar program The Do List, shares his top picks for local arts and performances.

    The full KQED Fall Arts Preview

    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 10:00 am
    BBC Newsnight [#17248H] duration 28:18   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2326] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 11:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3237H] duration 27:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Charlie Rose - The Week [#208] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#335H] Elizabeth Warren, Fighting Back against the Wall Street Giants In Oklahoma, Elizabeth Warren and her brothers grew up in "an America that invested in kids like us and helped build a future where we could flourish." But she writes in her book, A Fighting Chance, "Today the game is rigged - rigged to work for those who have money and power. The optimism that defines us as a people has been beaten and bruised. It doesn't have to be this way."
    Now the senior US senator from Massachusetts, Elizabeth Warren speaks with Bill Moyers on this week's edition. The former Harvard Law School professor is an expert on how Wall Street and the banking industry are destroying the middle class and has put that knowledge to powerful use on Capitol Hill. Senator Warren has rapidly become the most authoritative and articulate voice of the progressive wing of the Democratic Party. Many are urging her to run for president.
    "This is a fight over economics, a fight over privilege, a fight over power," she told the Netroots Nation conference in July. "But deep down it is a fight over values. Conservatives and their powerful friends will continue to be guided by their internal motto, 'I've got mine. The rest of you are on your own.' Well, we're guided by principle, and it's a pretty simple idea. We all do better when we work together and invest in building a future."
    Senator Elizabeth Warren has authored or co-authored ten books and is credited with envisioning and developing the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), which came into being with the passage of the Dodd-Frank banking reform bill. She was chair of the TARP Congressional Oversight Panel during the recent financial meltdown and senior advisor to the National Bankruptcy Review Commission.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 12:30 pm
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1801] HEROIN AND THE FAITH COMMUNITY - According to the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy, heroine abuse has reached "epidemic" levels across the country in both cities and small towns. Prominent evangelical leader Reverend Richard Cizik lost his son Richard Jr. to an overdose last year. Now he is pushing faith communities to get more involved by first acknowledging that heroine abuse is happening in their own churches. The acting director of the White House office, Michael Botticelli, also shares what role he believes faith groups can play in the crisis. "There is such a redemptive piece to recovery, and faith and spirituality has played a really pivotal role, in that recovery," says Botticelli. "We know that faith leaders can also, not only help us prevent the issue, but support people with addiction."
    WORLD WITHOUT HATE - Days after 9/11, Rais Bhuiyan was shot in the head by Mark Stroman in a hate crime targeted at Arabs. Bhuiyan survived the attack, and Stroman was sentenced to death, but Bhuiyan felt compelled by God to show love and compassion for his assailant. "I realize that I need to forgive him in public and do something to save the life," says Bhuiyan, "because I strongly believed that if Mark Stroman was given the chance, the opportunity which I had in my childhood, he would have become a different person." Bhuiyan forgave Stroman many times, even seconds before his execution, and says he believes he saw a change in the man that once tried to kill him. Now he has made teaching mercy and forgiveness his life's work.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 pm
    QUEST [#605H] X-Ray Microscope/ Astrophotography Meet the Bay Area scientists who have developed an amazing new microscope that uses X-rays to generate 3D views of cells. Then, learn why UC Berkeley researchers are using geckos, insects and other animals as inspiration for the design of new products. Plus, see the deep space astrophotography of Rogelio Bernal Andreo. duration 26:20   STEREO TVG
  • 1:30 pm
    BioCentury This Week [#336] duration 25:41   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    History Detectives [#107Z] The Depot That Made Dallas, Mexican Peso, Pirate Spyglass * The Depot That Made Dallas - A local historian in Dallas, Texas, has a question about an early railroad station in the middle of Dallas. He wants to know if this building was the first railroad station in Texas - and if so, was it responsible for creating the bustling metropolis that Dallas is today? HD hits town to investigate this railroad mystery.
    * Mexican Peso - A man from San Antonio, Texas, found what looked like Mexican currency among his late great-grandfather's possessions. Are they linked to the Mexican bandits Zapata and Pancho Villa? Did they play a part in the Mexican revolution in the1910s and if so, how did they get into the hands of his great-grandfather, a quiet family man from San Antonio?
    * Pirate Spyglass - Jean Lafitte has been called a fearsome pirate, an ingenious privateer and a war hero. His exploits are still recounted today in Texas and Louisiana. A librarian in Texas City, Texas, has a spyglass she believes may once have belonged to Lafitte. Old, but still in working condition, the object was donated to the local library by a descendent of Jim Campbell - a founder of the town and one of Lafitte's captains. Did Jean Lafitte give his trusted captain a spyglass, and if he did - is this Jean Lafitte's spyglass?
    duration 55:15   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 pm
    History Detectives [#209Z] Lost Gold Ship/John Hunt Morgan Saddle/Cesar Chavez Banner * Lost Gold Ship - Environmentalist Gabriel Scott was working in the Copper River Delta near Cordova, Alaska, when he came across the wreckage of an old ship. According to locals, these are the remains of the SS Portland, the famous steamship that carried 68 miners and nearly two tons of gold from the Klondike River to Seattle harbor and began the great Klondike Gold Rush of 1897. Could the stories be true? To find out, Elyse Luray joins a team of experts in Alaska to investigate the wreck. Mixing maritime history and forensic science, the team reveals the dramatic story of the SS Portland and confirms whether Scott has found the remains of this legendary ship.
    * John Hunt Morgan Saddle - A man in Paris, Kentucky, owns a beautifully preserved Western-style saddle, believed to have been used by the Confederate general, John Hunt Morgan, on his famous raid into Kentucky, Indiana and Ohio in July 1863. Could this be a relic from one of the most audacious attacks launched by the South during the Civil War? Wes Cowan is on the case and reveals a surprising personal connection: Wes' great-grandfather was actually one of "Morgan's Raiders" and was captured alongside Morgan during the historic raid.
    * Cesar Chavez Banner - A San Francisco woman has heard about a beautiful old banner owned by a local archive that, rumor has it, was carried at the head of the famous Delano Grape Boycott march led by Cesar Chavez in 1966. The banner features a painted Virgin of Guadalupe and a Union of Farm Workers Eagle, but its original ownership is a mystery. The contributor wants to know what role this banner may have played in Chavez' campaign to pursue better living conditions and rights for Mexican-American farm workers. HD travels to the West Coast to investigate the importance of art in one of the most famous civil rights campaigns in U.S. history.
    duration 55:46   STEREO TVG
  • 4:00 pm
    Independent Lens [#1321H] Circo The Ponce family's hardscrabble circus has lived and performed on the back roads of Mexico since the 19th century. But can their way of life survive into the 21st century? "Circo" (Circus) portrays the Ponce family circus as it struggles to make a living off its artistry, sweat and wit against the backdrop of Mexico's collapsing rural economy. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 5:00 pm
    Cruz Reynoso: Sowing The Seeds of Justice This program paints a portrait of a man touched by injustice as a child who dedicated his life to fighting discrimination and inequality as a lawyer, judge and teacher. The compelling biography, told through a combination of archival footage and interviews, charts Cruz Reynoso's humble origins, his appointment to the California Supreme Court (the first Latino justice to serve in the state's highest court) and more recently, his leadership on the US Commission on Civil Rights. duration 56:43   STEREO TVG
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour Weekend [#301H] Included: NewsHour Weekend examines the science of using dogs to detect cancer. For the past few decades, researchers have been exploring the possibility that cancer, possibly created by the growth of tumors, actually has a particular odor - and dogs can pick up on that smell. Some doctors believe this area of research may lead to more efficient screening methods and cancer treatment procedures. That, and the weekend's news, online and on-air. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5409H] The expanding threat of Islamic State (ISIL) extremists in Iraq and Syria and Russian President Vladimir Putin's continued aggression in Ukraine are dominating the NATO summit underway in Wales.
    Following the second beheading of an American journalist at the hands of ISIL, President Obama announced that the US strategy is to build an international coalition to "degrade and destroy" the jihadist group. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel said this week that more than 100 Americans are fighting with ISIL. This was the first time Hagel put an estimate on US citizens aiding the terrorist group.
    Meanwhile, many NATO leaders including President Obama believe Russia should be punished for its incursion into eastern Ukraine. The United States and European Union are expected to announce new sanctions against Russia on Friday that will expand current restrictions on the country's banking, energy and defense sectors. Also, the Pentagon has announced that 200 US troops are headed to western Ukraine to participate in exercises next week. This would mark the first time American ground troops have entered Ukraine since the crisis began. < br>What role should the US and NATO play in resolving the growing threat of ISIL as well as the continuing crisis in Ukraine? Joining us with analysis of the military strategies as well as the political implications: John Harwood of CNBC and The New York Times; Indira Lakshmanan of Bloomberg News; Yochi Dreazen of Foreign Policy Magazine; Peter Baker of The New York Times; and John Dickerson of Slate Magazine and CBS News .
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 pm
    KQED NEWSROOM [#141H] Gubernatorial Debate, Freshmen Lawmakers & Fall Arts Preview
    Gubernatorial Debate Gets Contentious
    As election season officially begins, our panel delves into California politics and reviews the only scheduled gubernatorial debate before the November 4 election between Gov. Jerry Brown and his Republican opponent, Neel Kashkari. The three-term governor has more money in his campaign chest and a solid lead over political newcomer Kashkari. The two sparred Thursday over education, the economy, high-speed rail and immigration reform.

    Guests:
    • John Myers, KQED News
    • Carla Marinucci, San Francisco Chronicle
    • Corey Cook, University of San Francisco

    Further Reporting:
    Analysis: Impact of Brown-Kashkari Debate ... Debatable
    Video: Brown and Kashkari Spar in Heated Gubernatorial Debate

    Freshmen Lawmakers May Create Change
    The freshman class of California legislators is the largest since 1966, the year Ronald Reagan beat Pat Brown for governor. They were elected in 2012, the same year voters relaxed term limits and after new primary rules and political redistricting procedures took effect. As a result, these lawmakers are making an effort to get along, which could lead to real change. At the close of the legislative session, John Myers, Senior Editor of the KQED Politics and Government Desk hears from Assemblymembers on both sides of the aisle -- Democrats Marc Levine and Susan Eggman and Republican Melissa Melendez -- about the new political climate in the state capital.

    Fall Arts Preview With "The Do List" Co-Host Cy Musiker
    It's September, and theaters, dance companies, music organizations, museums, galleries and artists around the Bay Area are rolling out their schedules of upcoming offerings. We look at what the fall arts season brings -- from Brandi Clark to the Batsheva Dance Company. Cy Musiker, co-host of KQED's weekly arts calendar program The Do List, shares his top picks for local arts and performances.

    The full KQED Fall Arts Preview

    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 7:30 pm
    QUEST [#605H] X-Ray Microscope/ Astrophotography Meet the Bay Area scientists who have developed an amazing new microscope that uses X-rays to generate 3D views of cells. Then, learn why UC Berkeley researchers are using geckos, insects and other animals as inspiration for the design of new products. Plus, see the deep space astrophotography of Rogelio Bernal Andreo. duration 26:20   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1304] London City Guide 2 Brianna Barnes embarks on her tour of London at Buckingham Palace, heads over to the National Gallery, check out the fashionable Spitalfields Market, tours the street art scene, visits the finest shops in to Mayfair and bikes from Regent's Park to the Olympic Stadium. She takes a daytrip to Oxford for a tour of Christchurch, the largest of all the Oxford colleges. Back in London, Brianna speeds off along the Thames River to Greenwich for a look at the Royal Naval College and the National Maritime Museum, then pops over to the Tate Modern, visits stately Cliveden House and the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew, home to the biggest botanical collection in the world before exploring the delights of Richmond Park on horseback. She concludes her stay in London by taking part in the annual Thames Festival. duration 56:14   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 9:00 pm
    Earthflight, A Nature Special Presentation [#102] Africa Fly and arrow-dive with cape gannets among sharks, dolphins, whales and the great sardine run. Soar with fish eagles, flamingoes, kelp gulls and vultures to see the most animal-packed continent with fresh eyes. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:00 pm
    Nova [#3704H] Ghosts of Machu Picchu Perched atop a mountain crest, mysteriously abandoned 400 years ago, Machu Picchu is the most famous archeological ruin in the Western hemisphere and an iconic symbol of the power and engineering prowess of the Inca. In the years since Machu Picchu was discovered by Hiram Bingham in 1911, there have been countless theories about this "Lost City of the Incas," yet it remains an enigma. Why did the Incas build it on such an inaccessible site, clinging to the steep face of a mountain? Who lived among its stone buildings, farmed its emerald green terraces and drank from its sophisticated aqueduct system? NOVA joins a new generation of archeologists as they probe areas of Machu Picchu that haven't been touched since the time of the Incas and unearth burial grounds of the people who built the sacred site. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG-V (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 11:00 pm
    Operation Maneater [#102H] Polar Bear Mark Evans travels to the shores of Canada's Hudson Bay where polar bears are causing havoc in isolated communities. He arrives in the town of Churchill hours after an attack has left two people with serious injuries and a bear dead. Mark joins the Polar Bear Alert team as they transport a captured bear by helicopter to a release site outside town. And in the Inuit town of Arviat, Mark works with wildlife officers to test an aerial drone early warning system, a military grade ultra-loud speaker to deter bears and a controversial experiment to place meat out on the tundra to divert bears away from town. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 12:00 am
    America Reframed [#211] Drivers Wanted This program reveals the impossibly eclectic community inhabiting a taxi garage in Queens, New York. Each day, a million New Yorkers depend on the anonymous faces behind the wheels, the men who tirelessly drive the city that doesn't sleep. The film follows Eric, a new immigrant from China with a fresh start in America. With dreams of his own business, and a wife and two young sons to support, he turns to a simple job - driving a taxicab. But the easy route proves to be a Herculean struggle for Eric, who can neither speak the language of his customers nor navigate the city's 6,174 miles of streets. Along for Eric's ride, we meet classic New York personalities, including the city's oldest taxi driver, the rumored inspiration behind Danny DeVito's Louie DePalma, and a melting pot of immigrants with dreams of making it in America. duration 54:16   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
Saturday, September 6, 2014

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    • Wed 10/15 morning: KQED Plus (KQEH) Over the Air signal down

      UPDATE: This problem has been resolved, and the OTA signal for the DT54 channels restored. (DT54.1 through 54.5) KQED Plus’ Over the Air transmission is currently off air via our KQEH transmitter on Monument Peak northeast of San Jose. Technicians are working on the problem. No current estimate regarding how long this will exist. We […]

    • KQET (DT25) Over the Air: Wed 8/27

      We are aware of the break-up issues for our DT25 Over the Air signal in the Monterey/Salinas area. This will also affect viewers of any cable or satellite signal provider using that transmitter as their source. Engineers are working on the problem.

    • Week of 8/25: Sutro Tower work (including KQED 9 Over the Air)

      (Affects several San Francisco TV & Radio stations, including KQED 9.1, 9.2 & 9.3) During the week of August 25, Monday through Friday, between 9am and 4pm, several TV and radio stations will be switching to their Auxiliary antennas. This is being done so that the tower crew can perform routine maintenance on the regular […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Comcast 9 and 709
Digital 9.1, 54.2 or 25.1

All widescreen and HD programs

KQED Plus

Channel 54
Comcast 10 and 710
Digital 9.2, 54.1 or 25.2

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life
Comcast 189
Digital 54.3

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Comcast 190
Digital 9.3

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Comcast 191 & 621
Digital 54.5 or 25.3

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Comcast 192
Digital 54.4

Quality children's programming parents love too