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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Tuesday, September 2, 2014

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Tuesday, September 2, 2014
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#11045] UKRAINE UPDATE - Russia, Ukraine and Ukrainian rebels gathered in Belarus today to begin new rounds of talks aimed at restoring peace in Ukraine. Judy Woodruff gets an update on the latest developments with Fred Weir, Moscow correspondent for The Christian Science Monitor.
    PART-TIME WORKERS - The current job market has seen a sharp increase in the number of part-time workers, in part because workers are now seeking flexibility in their hours and employers are looking to control labor costs. NewsHour economics correspondent Paul Solman looks at some of the consequences as part of his ongoing reporting series, "Making Sen$e."
    BREAKTHROUGH SCHOOLS - Special correspondent Terry Rubin reports from Minnesota, where an innovative summer school program is aimed at motivating its students to apply for college.
    PAKISTAN - The wave of political unrest continued in Pakistan today as anti-government protesters clashed with police and stormed the local state TV building, forcing the channel briefly off the air. Judy Woodruff discusses the issue with Husain Haqqani, former Pakistan ambassador to the US and Moeed Yusuf, director of South Asia programs at the US Institute for Peace.
    FOOTBALL - Jeffery Brown sits down with Mark Edmundson, author of "Why Football Matters: My Education in the Game," to find out what makes football such an integral part of American culture.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#33174] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#3280] Tavis concludes his conversation with the comedienne who cracked the gender ceiling for women in stand-up, Joan Rivers. The internationally renowned comedienne and best-selling author talks about her latest text, Diary of a Mad Diva. Originally aired on July 15, 2014 duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Independent Lens [#1320] Facing The Storm: Story of the American Bison The bison is an enduring symbol of America and yet it stands on the brink of collapse. Cattle ranching, urban sprawl and sport hunting has squeezed the beast from the Great Plains it once dominated. Is there room for the American bison in America anymore? duration 56:43   STEREO TVPG-V (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Newsline [#5112] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#3281] Tavis talks with Grammy-winning country music artist Rosanne Cash, who comments on why her latest effort, "The River & The Thread," is a marked departure from her earlier work. Originally aired on April 15, 2014 duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 am
    Asia This Week [#422] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:30 am
    European Journal [#3235] Deadly Danger: Looming Tsunami In Norwa Norway: Deadly Danger - More often than not, people associate tsunamis with Japan. But people living around Geirangerfjord in Norway are well aware of their own vulnerability to a huge tidal wave. Mount ?kernes threatens to crash into the fjord, with incalculable consequences. Geologists are measuring and monitoring the steep mountain's movements, and are sure the tsunami that would result from a major landslide would inundate the surrounding villages. Scientists say an 80-meter tidal wave following a collapse would sweep everything into the narrow arm of the sea. 4,000 villagers are at risk. Some have already moved to higher elevations. Others continue to live down near the water, despite the threat of a natural disaster. The area has already experienced two such disasters. In 1905 and 1934, dozens of people lost their lives. Romania: Fearless Shepherds - Their lives are poor, archaic and not without danger. Shepherds in Romania have to be on constant alert for wolves and brown bears that attack their herds. Some 5,000 to 6,000 bears roam the forests of the Carpathian Mountains. There are especially large numbers of them in summer. Then thousands of shepherds with their sheep dogs trek through the mountains and valleys of the Carpathians. Usually just a wooden box serves as summer accommodation. The dwelling stands in the middle of the area where they feed their flocks. That makes its easier for the shepherds to keep an eye on their animals and protect them. Bears and wolves aren't the only danger for the shepherds, however. Germany: Resolute Refugees - Countless refugee dramas have taken place off the coast of Lampedusa. Year after year, tens of thousands of people fleeing Africa end up on the Italian island. But hardly any of them want to stay in Italy. One group has managed to get as far as Berlin. In recent history the Berlin district of Kreuzberg has enjoyed a reputation for being unconventional and nonconformist. For several months now it's also been accommodating several dozen refugees from Morocco, Senegal, Sudan and other African countries. The immigrants Africa haven't found a permanent home there, however. They are living in a disused school, tolerated by the authorities, eyed warily by residents, beset by the police. As most are threatened with expulsion, some took refuge on the roof of the school. Britain: Historical Trauma - A hundred years after World War One, Britain is remembering not only the 17 million victims who lost their lives on all fronts and sides, but also the many men who returned home from the battlefields of Europe with psychological scars. Some of the former soldiers suffered from a hitherto unknown disorder: shell shock. Sergeant Bernard Brookes, a signaler, wrote a diary describing the appalling conditions in the trenches and his difficulties after being invalided out of active service with the condition. He wrote extensively about how society treated the traumatized returning soldiers. His letters and diary were published in book form early last year. duration 26:10   STEREO TVG
  • 5:00 am
    CSI On Trial When does solving a crime become a crime? An innocent man confessed to murder and forensic evidence supported his confession. The real killers confessed, but they were ignored by the police. Across the nation, criminal convictions are being overturned due to either incompetence or deliberate misconduct in crime labs. How did Nebraska's foremost CSI fall under suspicion of faking evidence? "CSI on Trial" follows what went wrong in Nebraska and what we can learn from this tragedy. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    Assassination: Idaho's Trial of the Century This program combines re-enactments, stills, expert commentary and archival footage to piece together one of the most famous criminal trials in US history. In the summer of 1907, the long-simmering tensions between trade unionists and capitalists finally played out in an Idaho courtroom when "Big Bill" Haywood, the secretary-treasurer of the Western Federation of Miners, stood charged with orchestrating the murder of former governor Frank Steunenberg. The 3-month trial thrust Idaho into the national spotlight, as two of the West's sharpest legal minds, criminal lawyer James Hawley and newly elected United States Senator William Borah, clashed with legendary defense attorney Clarence Darrow in a "struggle for the soul of America." duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 7:00 am
    Local USA [#106] Defying Disabilities Three stories question the limits of any disability: the loving marriage of two intellectually-challenged individuals in New York City; a volunteer program that introduces unlikely candidates to surfing on the North Shore of Hawaii; and a blind North Carolina hiker sets out to climb the Appalachian Trail. duration 27:30   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:30 am
    Local USA [#105] Native American Culture Three stories about the modern Native American culture: A look at how climate change is effecting a Pacific Northwest tribe known as the "Salmon People" and how science can help find a solution; the Lincoln, Nebraska rock star artist who's creating sculptures, linking the past to the present; and the fight an Oklahoma tribe tries to revive their fading language. duration 26:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:00 am
    Independent Lens [#1320] Facing The Storm: Story of the American Bison The bison is an enduring symbol of America and yet it stands on the brink of collapse. Cattle ranching, urban sprawl and sport hunting has squeezed the beast from the Great Plains it once dominated. Is there room for the American bison in America anymore? duration 56:43   STEREO TVPG-V (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:00 am
    Tavis Smiley [#3281] Tavis talks with Grammy-winning country music artist Rosanne Cash, who comments on why her latest effort, "The River & The Thread," is a marked departure from her earlier work. Originally aired on April 15, 2014 duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#3280] Tavis concludes his conversation with the comedienne who cracked the gender ceiling for women in stand-up, Joan Rivers. The internationally renowned comedienne and best-selling author talks about her latest text, Diary of a Mad Diva. Originally aired on July 15, 2014 duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:00 am
    Asia This Week [#422] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:30 am
    European Journal [#3235] Deadly Danger: Looming Tsunami In Norwa Norway: Deadly Danger - More often than not, people associate tsunamis with Japan. But people living around Geirangerfjord in Norway are well aware of their own vulnerability to a huge tidal wave. Mount ?kernes threatens to crash into the fjord, with incalculable consequences. Geologists are measuring and monitoring the steep mountain's movements, and are sure the tsunami that would result from a major landslide would inundate the surrounding villages. Scientists say an 80-meter tidal wave following a collapse would sweep everything into the narrow arm of the sea. 4,000 villagers are at risk. Some have already moved to higher elevations. Others continue to live down near the water, despite the threat of a natural disaster. The area has already experienced two such disasters. In 1905 and 1934, dozens of people lost their lives. Romania: Fearless Shepherds - Their lives are poor, archaic and not without danger. Shepherds in Romania have to be on constant alert for wolves and brown bears that attack their herds. Some 5,000 to 6,000 bears roam the forests of the Carpathian Mountains. There are especially large numbers of them in summer. Then thousands of shepherds with their sheep dogs trek through the mountains and valleys of the Carpathians. Usually just a wooden box serves as summer accommodation. The dwelling stands in the middle of the area where they feed their flocks. That makes its easier for the shepherds to keep an eye on their animals and protect them. Bears and wolves aren't the only danger for the shepherds, however. Germany: Resolute Refugees - Countless refugee dramas have taken place off the coast of Lampedusa. Year after year, tens of thousands of people fleeing Africa end up on the Italian island. But hardly any of them want to stay in Italy. One group has managed to get as far as Berlin. In recent history the Berlin district of Kreuzberg has enjoyed a reputation for being unconventional and nonconformist. For several months now it's also been accommodating several dozen refugees from Morocco, Senegal, Sudan and other African countries. The immigrants Africa haven't found a permanent home there, however. They are living in a disused school, tolerated by the authorities, eyed warily by residents, beset by the police. As most are threatened with expulsion, some took refuge on the roof of the school. Britain: Historical Trauma - A hundred years after World War One, Britain is remembering not only the 17 million victims who lost their lives on all fronts and sides, but also the many men who returned home from the battlefields of Europe with psychological scars. Some of the former soldiers suffered from a hitherto unknown disorder: shell shock. Sergeant Bernard Brookes, a signaler, wrote a diary describing the appalling conditions in the trenches and his difficulties after being invalided out of active service with the condition. He wrote extensively about how society treated the traumatized returning soldiers. His letters and diary were published in book form early last year. duration 26:10   STEREO TVG
  • 11:00 am
    CSI On Trial When does solving a crime become a crime? An innocent man confessed to murder and forensic evidence supported his confession. The real killers confessed, but they were ignored by the police. Across the nation, criminal convictions are being overturned due to either incompetence or deliberate misconduct in crime labs. How did Nebraska's foremost CSI fall under suspicion of faking evidence? "CSI on Trial" follows what went wrong in Nebraska and what we can learn from this tragedy. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Assassination: Idaho's Trial of the Century This program combines re-enactments, stills, expert commentary and archival footage to piece together one of the most famous criminal trials in US history. In the summer of 1907, the long-simmering tensions between trade unionists and capitalists finally played out in an Idaho courtroom when "Big Bill" Haywood, the secretary-treasurer of the Western Federation of Miners, stood charged with orchestrating the murder of former governor Frank Steunenberg. The 3-month trial thrust Idaho into the national spotlight, as two of the West's sharpest legal minds, criminal lawyer James Hawley and newly elected United States Senator William Borah, clashed with legendary defense attorney Clarence Darrow in a "struggle for the soul of America." duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 1:00 pm
    Local USA [#106] Defying Disabilities Three stories question the limits of any disability: the loving marriage of two intellectually-challenged individuals in New York City; a volunteer program that introduces unlikely candidates to surfing on the North Shore of Hawaii; and a blind North Carolina hiker sets out to climb the Appalachian Trail. duration 27:30   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 pm
    Local USA [#105] Native American Culture Three stories about the modern Native American culture: A look at how climate change is effecting a Pacific Northwest tribe known as the "Salmon People" and how science can help find a solution; the Lincoln, Nebraska rock star artist who's creating sculptures, linking the past to the present; and the fight an Oklahoma tribe tries to revive their fading language. duration 26:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 pm
    Newsline [#5112] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 2:30 pm
    Journal [#10175] duration 28:10   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 pm
    Tavis Smiley [#3281] Tavis talks with Grammy-winning country music artist Rosanne Cash, who comments on why her latest effort, "The River & The Thread," is a marked departure from her earlier work. Originally aired on April 15, 2014 duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:30 pm
    Nightly Business Report [#33175] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#11046] ISLAMIC STATE- A video released today by the Islamic State militant group claims to show the beheading of American journalist Steven Sotloff. Sotloff appeared briefly in the August 19 video showing the beheading of another American journalist, James Foley. In that video, Foley's killer threatened that Sotloff would suffer the same fate if US air strikes continued in Iraq. Today's video threatened the life of a third hostage, British aid worker David Cawthorne Haines. Judy Woodruff debriefs with Charles Sennott, co-founder of GlobalPost. She then discusses the horrific killing with Douglas Ollivant, a senior national security fellow with the New America Foundation, Anne-Marie Slaughter, president and CEO of the New America Foundation, and Daniel Benjamin, director of the John Sloan Dickey Center for International Understanding at Dartmouth University.
    EBOLA - Public health officials have voiced concern over the growing Ebola outbreak in West Africa. They say that it could destabilize countries in the region, and warn that the window is closing to keep it contained. Jeffrey Brown examines the outbreak and its potential impact with Dr. Tom Frieden, the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, who has just returned from West Africa.
    PRIVACY HACK - The theft of celebrities' personal photos, which were posted online without their consent Sunday, have raised questions over just how secure personal information is online. Judy Woodruff has the story.
    CHINA ORPHANS - As part of his "Agents for Change" series, NewsHour correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports on one woman's efforts to change the way orphans are cared for in China.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 pm
    Nightly Business Report [#33175] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:30 pm
    Democracy Now! [#4027] duration 59:00   STEREO TVRE
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Newsline [#5112] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3677H] duration 1:00  
  • 7:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#11046] ISLAMIC STATE- A video released today by the Islamic State militant group claims to show the beheading of American journalist Steven Sotloff. Sotloff appeared briefly in the August 19 video showing the beheading of another American journalist, James Foley. In that video, Foley's killer threatened that Sotloff would suffer the same fate if US air strikes continued in Iraq. Today's video threatened the life of a third hostage, British aid worker David Cawthorne Haines. Judy Woodruff debriefs with Charles Sennott, co-founder of GlobalPost. She then discusses the horrific killing with Douglas Ollivant, a senior national security fellow with the New America Foundation, Anne-Marie Slaughter, president and CEO of the New America Foundation, and Daniel Benjamin, director of the John Sloan Dickey Center for International Understanding at Dartmouth University.
    EBOLA - Public health officials have voiced concern over the growing Ebola outbreak in West Africa. They say that it could destabilize countries in the region, and warn that the window is closing to keep it contained. Jeffrey Brown examines the outbreak and its potential impact with Dr. Tom Frieden, the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, who has just returned from West Africa.
    PRIVACY HACK - The theft of celebrities' personal photos, which were posted online without their consent Sunday, have raised questions over just how secure personal information is online. Judy Woodruff has the story.
    CHINA ORPHANS - As part of his "Agents for Change" series, NewsHour correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports on one woman's efforts to change the way orphans are cared for in China.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:57 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3677H] duration 1:00  
  • 8:00 pm
    Charlie Rose [#20182] (original broadcast date: 9/02/14)
    * An assessment of ISIS and the latest news from Ukraine with Richard Haass, president of the Council on Foreign Relations & Steve Coll of the New Yorker magazine
    * an update on politics with Mark Halperin & John Heilemann
    duration 56:47   STEREO TVRE
  • 8:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3677H] duration 1:00  
  • 9:00 pm
    Tavis Smiley [#3282] Tavis talks with best-selling authors Steven Levitt and Stephen Dubner. The co-authors of the best-selling Freakonomics book series unpack the latest installment, Think Like a Freak. Tavis also chats with contemporary jazz star Brian Culbertson. The multi-instrumentalist explains why he's celebrating his 20th anniversary as a recording artist with a remake of his debut CD and also performs the track, "Horizon". duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:28 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3677H] duration 1:00  
  • 9:30 pm
    Roadtrip Nation [#211] Interviews include the Editor of "Seventeen" magazine, the owner of an adored chocolate shop in New York City, and world famous photographer Abelardo Morrell. duration 26:46   TVPG
  • 9:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3677H] duration 1:00  
  • 10:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#11046] ISLAMIC STATE- A video released today by the Islamic State militant group claims to show the beheading of American journalist Steven Sotloff. Sotloff appeared briefly in the August 19 video showing the beheading of another American journalist, James Foley. In that video, Foley's killer threatened that Sotloff would suffer the same fate if US air strikes continued in Iraq. Today's video threatened the life of a third hostage, British aid worker David Cawthorne Haines. Judy Woodruff debriefs with Charles Sennott, co-founder of GlobalPost. She then discusses the horrific killing with Douglas Ollivant, a senior national security fellow with the New America Foundation, Anne-Marie Slaughter, president and CEO of the New America Foundation, and Daniel Benjamin, director of the John Sloan Dickey Center for International Understanding at Dartmouth University.
    EBOLA - Public health officials have voiced concern over the growing Ebola outbreak in West Africa. They say that it could destabilize countries in the region, and warn that the window is closing to keep it contained. Jeffrey Brown examines the outbreak and its potential impact with Dr. Tom Frieden, the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, who has just returned from West Africa.
    PRIVACY HACK - The theft of celebrities' personal photos, which were posted online without their consent Sunday, have raised questions over just how secure personal information is online. Judy Woodruff has the story.
    CHINA ORPHANS - As part of his "Agents for Change" series, NewsHour correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports on one woman's efforts to change the way orphans are cared for in China.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:57 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3677H] duration 1:00  
  • 11:00 pm
    Democracy Now! [#4027] duration 59:00   STEREO TVRE
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#11046] ISLAMIC STATE- A video released today by the Islamic State militant group claims to show the beheading of American journalist Steven Sotloff. Sotloff appeared briefly in the August 19 video showing the beheading of another American journalist, James Foley. In that video, Foley's killer threatened that Sotloff would suffer the same fate if US air strikes continued in Iraq. Today's video threatened the life of a third hostage, British aid worker David Cawthorne Haines. Judy Woodruff debriefs with Charles Sennott, co-founder of GlobalPost. She then discusses the horrific killing with Douglas Ollivant, a senior national security fellow with the New America Foundation, Anne-Marie Slaughter, president and CEO of the New America Foundation, and Daniel Benjamin, director of the John Sloan Dickey Center for International Understanding at Dartmouth University.
    EBOLA - Public health officials have voiced concern over the growing Ebola outbreak in West Africa. They say that it could destabilize countries in the region, and warn that the window is closing to keep it contained. Jeffrey Brown examines the outbreak and its potential impact with Dr. Tom Frieden, the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, who has just returned from West Africa.
    PRIVACY HACK - The theft of celebrities' personal photos, which were posted online without their consent Sunday, have raised questions over just how secure personal information is online. Judy Woodruff has the story.
    CHINA ORPHANS - As part of his "Agents for Change" series, NewsHour correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports on one woman's efforts to change the way orphans are cared for in China.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
Tuesday, September 2, 2014

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TV Technical Issues

TV
    TV Technical Issues
    • KQET (DT25) Over the Air: Wed 8/27

      We are aware of the break-up issues for our DT25 Over the Air signal in the Monterey/Salinas area. This will also affect viewers of any cable or satellite signal provider using that transmitter as their source. Engineers are working on the problem.

    • Week of 8/25: Sutro Tower work (including KQED 9 Over the Air)

      (Affects several San Francisco TV & Radio stations, including KQED 9.1, 9.2 & 9.3) During the week of August 25, Monday through Friday, between 9am and 4pm, several TV and radio stations will be switching to their Auxiliary antennas. This is being done so that the tower crew can perform routine maintenance on the regular […]

    • KQET Off Air Sun 8/03 morning

      (DT25.1, 25.2, 25.3) KQET DT25 was off the air for a portion of Sunday morning, due to the transmitter taking a power hit. The signal has been restored. Most receivers should have re-acquired our signal once it returned, but a few Over the Air viewers may need to do a rescan in order to restore […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Comcast 9 and 709
Digital 9.1, 54.2 or 25.1

All widescreen and HD programs

KQED Plus

Channel 54
Comcast 10 and 710
Digital 9.2, 54.1 or 25.2

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life
Comcast 189
Digital 54.3

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Comcast 190
Digital 9.3

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Comcast 191 & 621
Digital 54.5 or 25.3

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Comcast 192
Digital 54.4

Quality children's programming parents love too