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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Saturday, May 31, 2014

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, May 31, 2014
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10940] SHINSEKI RESIGNATION - Secretary of Veterans Affairs Eric Shinseki resigned today after meeting with President Obama. Jeffrey Brown discusses General Shinseki's departure and the systemic problems inherited by current acting secretary Sloan Gibson with Paul Rieckhoff, founder and executive director of Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America, Joseph Violante, legislative director of Disabled American Veterans, and Dr. Stephan Xenakis, a retired Army Brigadier General and Chief Medical Officer at Mindcare Solutions. < br>SHIELDS & BROOKS - Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks analyze this week's biggest stories.
    CLIPPERS DEAL - Former Microsoft chief executive Steve Ballmer won the bidding for the Los Angeles Clippers last night with a record $2 billion offer to buy the franchise. Hari Sreenivasan examines the future of the team and questions about whether current owner, Donald Sterling, could slow down the sale.
    JESSYE NORMAN - Singer Jessye Norman's voice has filled the greatest cathedrals in the world. Jeffrey Brown sits down with Norman tonight to discuss her new memoir and what made her the performer she is today.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#33108] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#3214] Tavis talks with influential entrepreneur Arianna Huffington. The international media mogul unpacks her latest text, Thrive, an exploration of the pursuit of two traditional metrics of success - money and power. Tavis also chats with contemporary jazz star Brian Culbertson. The multi-instrumentalist explains why he's celebrating his 20th anniversary as a recording artist with a remake of his debut CD and also performs the track, "Horizon." duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Gathering of Heroes In 2004, the United States dedicated a long-awaited memorial to the 16 million men and women who served in the armed forces during World War II, the 400,000 who died in Europe and the Pacific and those who toiled in factories on the home front. This program recounts the touching and inspirational story of World War II veterans from Indiana who embarked on a cross-country trek to Washington, DC, to visit the memorial which honors their sacrifice. On the 12-hour bus ride, the veterans (most in their 80s and 90s) reminisce about their war experiences, sharing their emotional tales of struggle and survival. duration 26:50   STEREO TVG
  • 2:30 am
    Forsaken Fields "Internment happened more than fifty years ago, and yet when [they] allowed themselves to remember things, years of pent-up emotions quickly came to the surface." - Producer Midori Sperandeo
    This program documents what happened to the first and second generation of Japanese-American farmers after the bombing of Pearl Harbor in 1941. Emmy award-winning journalist Jan Yanehiro interviews farmers who worked the land in California before the war, as well as those citizens who were incarcerated in relocation centers or forced to move to the interior of the United States by executive order. The program honors the Japanese-Americans who helped build California agriculture and explores the racism and intolerance that gripped the country at that time.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1739H] POPE FRANCIS MIDDLE EAST TRIP REPORT - Pope Francis led an historic visit to the Middle East May 24-26 that was filled with spontaneous gestures and dramatic calls for peace and interfaith understanding. Kim Lawton reports on the pope's trip and what people of faith hope will result from it. (new segment)
    PAKISTAN POLIO CAMPAIGN - The World Health Organization has warned that new polio outbreaks are rising in several areas, threatening recent successes in wiping out the crippling disease. Pakistan is one of the places where polio is endemic. Fred de Sam Lazaro reports from Karachi on that nation's efforts to vaccinate its public, including projects with Muslim imams to convince Pakistanis that vaccine programs are not spy operations and that they are consistent with Islam. (Originally aired October 2013)
    MORE MORMON MISSIONARIES - At a time when many Christian denominations continue to lose members, the number of people in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is going up steadily, from 3 million in 1970 to more than 15 million today, worldwide. One reason is new, lower age limits for both men and women who want to serve as missionaries. Lucky Severson reports that there are now more than 80,000 Mormon missionaries around the world trying to combat what one Mormon leader calls the "growing level of wickedness." (Originally aired December 2013)
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1049] A Small Cap Investor Thinks Big WT features a "Great Investor" who has made his name investing in small company stocks. Charlie Dreifus, the portfolio manager of the Royce Special Equity funds, explains why he now favors large companies and discusses where he is finding the greatest values in the market now. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2312H] * How Gender Plays a Role in Mass Shootings * Arianna Huffington's New Book "Thrive" * Remembering Maya Angelou ,br>Panelists: IWF Sabrina Schaeffer; Associate Professor Dr. Lara Brown; CNN Political Commentator Donna Brazile; The Daily Mail's Francesca Chambers. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    Asian Voices [#304] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    War Zone/Comfort Zone Women account for roughly 14 percent of the active-duty U.S. military and more than 24 percent of the National Guard, yet they often receive less than a hero's welcome upon their return to civilian life. Many face poverty, homelessness and joblessness; deal with the psychological and physiological effects of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder from military sexual trauma and combatrelated injuries; and often receive poor service from a Veterans Administration ill-equipped and, in some cases, unwilling to help them. The Emmy? -nominated documentary WAR ZONE/COMFORT ZONE uncovers the plight of these veterans through the intense and personal stories of four women veterans coping with life after their military service. Each seeks a sense of normalcy and peace without the benefit of a comprehensive support system. WAR ZONE/COMFORT ZONE weaves together intimate interviews with the story of two women - Shalini Madaras and Joy Kiss - struggling to establish transitional housing for homeless female veterans in Bridgeport, Connecticut, despite virulent community opposition. duration 56:04   STEREO TVPG
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    Coming Back with Wes Moore [#103] Moving Forward Host Wes Moore highlights the drive veterans often have of finding a new mission. Revisiting Taylor Urruela, his immediate mission is succeeding in the competitive tryouts for the University of Tampa baseball team, despite the fact that he's missing a leg. He is also finding meaning in Vet Sports, an organization he co-founded that helps veterans socialize through playing a variety of sports.
    Bobby Henline is still on his new mission of helping others through his comedy, but his PTSD is still interfering with his home life. His personal mission is to overcome this and fix his relationship with his family.
    Earl Johnson, whose lies have caught up with him in the previous episode, struggles to keep his mission of revitalizing the Oliver. Tammy Duckworth, currently a Congresswoman from Illinois, was a helicopter pilot in Iraq and the survivor of a crash that caused her to lose both of her legs. In honor of those who saved her, Tammy now has a mission to continue serving the public and be a voice for her fellow vets.
    Finally, Wes meets Stacy Pearsall who was a war photographer who was hit by an IED in Iraq and now suffers with mild brain damage. Though she was told she'd never be able to be the photographer she once was, she now travels the country taking portraits of veterans as part of the Veteran's Portraits Project.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG-V (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1739H] POPE FRANCIS MIDDLE EAST TRIP REPORT - Pope Francis led an historic visit to the Middle East May 24-26 that was filled with spontaneous gestures and dramatic calls for peace and interfaith understanding. Kim Lawton reports on the pope's trip and what people of faith hope will result from it. (new segment)
    PAKISTAN POLIO CAMPAIGN - The World Health Organization has warned that new polio outbreaks are rising in several areas, threatening recent successes in wiping out the crippling disease. Pakistan is one of the places where polio is endemic. Fred de Sam Lazaro reports from Karachi on that nation's efforts to vaccinate its public, including projects with Muslim imams to convince Pakistanis that vaccine programs are not spy operations and that they are consistent with Islam. (Originally aired October 2013)
    MORE MORMON MISSIONARIES - At a time when many Christian denominations continue to lose members, the number of people in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is going up steadily, from 3 million in 1970 to more than 15 million today, worldwide. One reason is new, lower age limits for both men and women who want to serve as missionaries. Lucky Severson reports that there are now more than 80,000 Mormon missionaries around the world trying to combat what one Mormon leader calls the "growing level of wickedness." (Originally aired December 2013)
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#321H] No to Tax Dodgers, Yes to Fair Play A new report by Nobel Prize-winning economist Joseph E. Stiglitz for the Roosevelt Institute suggests that paying our fair share of taxes and cracking down on corporate tax dodgers could be a cure for inequality and a faltering economy. This week, Stiglitz tells Bill Moyers that Apple, Google, GE and a host of other Fortune 500 companies are creating what amounts to "an unlimited IRA for corporations," some of them paying no taxes whatsoever. The result? Vast amounts of lost revenue for our treasury and the exporting of much-needed jobs to other countries.
    "I think we can use our tax system to create a better society, to be an expression of our true values." Stiglitz tells Bill Moyers. "But if people don't think that their tax system is fair, they're not going to want to contribute. It's going to be difficult to get them to pay. And, unfortunately, right now, our tax system is neither fair nor efficient."
    Stiglitz continues, "We have a tax system that reflects not the interest of the middle. We have a tax system that reflects the interest of the 1%. What I want to do is create a tax system that has incentives to create jobs. And if you tell a corporation, 'Look, if you don't create jobs, you're taking out of our system, you're not putting anything back, you're going to pay a high tax. But if you put back into our system by investing, then you can get your tax rate down.' That seems to me common sense, particularly in a time like today, when 20 million Americans need a full-time job and can't get one."
    Joseph Stiglitz's best-selling books, including The Price of Inequality, The Trillion Dollar War and Freefall have shaped worldwide debates on globalization, income inequality and the role of government in the financial marketplace. He is currently a professor at Columbia University, a senior fellow at the Roosevelt Institute and president of the International Economic Association. Stiglitz served as chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers under President Bill Clinton, and as chief economist of the World Bank.
    duration 24:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 8:00 am
    LinkAsia [#249] duration 26:46   STEREO
  • 8:30 am
    Maria Hinojosa: One-On-One [#507H] Shoshana Johnson The United States' first black female prisoner of war (captured with Jessica Lynch and others of the 507th Maintenance Company) relives the military ordeal that changed her life forever, and discusses the role of women in combat and the stigma related to psychological injuries. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:00 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5348H] It has been a whirlwind week for President Obama: a surprise trip to Afghanistan just prior to announcing troop reductions in that conflict; a major speech on his vision for the military and the US role in the world; new calls to replace Veterans Affairs Secretary Eric Shinseki amid allegation of scandal and misconduct in VA hospitals around the country. In some respects, the week has been a microcosm of the types of situations that have defined and sometimes plagued Mr. Obama's second term. With upcoming mid-term elections - which are rarely hospitable to incumbent presidents - and a flagging legislative agenda ahead, how will he tackle the remaining 2-1/2 years of his presidency?
    This week, we take a look at the president's standing 18-months into his second term - his priorities, his stumbles and the potential obstacles ahead, both politically and internationally. Joining Gwen around the table to discuss Obama at a Crossroads: Peter Baker, New York Times; Christi Parsons, Tribune Newspapers; Michael Crowley, Time Magazine; and Carrie Budoff Brown, Politico.
    duration 24:10   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:30 am
    KQED NEWSROOM [#129H] Legislating Public Safety, Congresswoman Jackie Speier and Maya Angelou Tribute
    Legislating Public Safety
    As the community of Isla Vista mourns, the deadly rampage last weekend has re-invigorated calls for legislative action. In Washington today, Rep. Mike Thompson (D-St Helena) introduced federal legislation to target mental health services and reduce gun violence. Earlier in the week, California Assembly members Nancy Skinner (D-Berkeley) and Das Williams (D-Santa Barbara) proposed bills to further restrict access to guns for people deemed mentally ill. Senate leader Darrell Steinberg announced a separate set of proposals to address mental health care in the criminal justice system and to expand training for law enforcement officers. Can legislation prevent would-be-killers before they go on rampages?

    Guests:
    • Frank Zimring, UC Berkeley School of Law
    • Josh Richman, Bay Area News Group
    • April Dembosky, KQED Health Reporter

    Further Reporting:
    Amid Warning Signs, Isla Vista Killer Slipped Through System
    Isla Vista Aftermath: Can Legislation Prevent Mass Shootings?

    Congresswoman Jackie Speier on Sexual Assault on College Campuses
    Colleges across the country are grappling with sexual violence against women on campuses - what a White House task force recently called an epidemic that affects one in five college women. Meanwhile, the Office of Civil Rights is investigating complaints from more than fifty campuses across the country, including UC Berkeley, which is also the subject of a state probe. Scott Shafer recently sat down with Bay Area Congresswoman Jackie Speier, who is expected to introduce legislation in the coming weeks to address the issue.

    Further Reporting:
    Speier Demands Accountability for Campus Sexual Assaults
    UC Berkeley Students Press for Stronger Action on Sexual Assaults

    Maya Angelou Tribute
    The world lost a cultural and civil rights icon this week, poet Maya Angelou, who died at 86. In her memory, we share an encore presentation from the KQED archives. Belva Davis, former host of KQED's This Week in Northern California, was a longtime friend of Angelou and visited with the author in 2012 to talk about the power and beauty of friendship.

    Further Reporting:
    Video: KQED's Belva Davis Recalls Her Friendship with Maya Angelou
    Maya Angelou: Remembering a Cultural Giant's Life in San Francisco
    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 10:00 am
    BBC Newsnight [#17150Z] duration 28:18   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2312H] * How Gender Plays a Role in Mass Shootings * Arianna Huffington's New Book "Thrive" * Remembering Maya Angelou ,br>Panelists: IWF Sabrina Schaeffer; Associate Professor Dr. Lara Brown; CNN Political Commentator Donna Brazile; The Daily Mail's Francesca Chambers. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3223H] duration 27:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Charlie Rose - The Week [#146H] * Mike Allen discusses the resignation of the Secretary of Veterans Affairs * Susan Rice, National Security Advisor * We remember Maya Angelou who died this week * Nas looks back at his groundbreaking first album: Illmatic * George Saunders on "Congratulations, By the Way: Some Thoughts on Kindness" duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#321H] No to Tax Dodgers, Yes to Fair Play A new report by Nobel Prize-winning economist Joseph E. Stiglitz for the Roosevelt Institute suggests that paying our fair share of taxes and cracking down on corporate tax dodgers could be a cure for inequality and a faltering economy. This week, Stiglitz tells Bill Moyers that Apple, Google, GE and a host of other Fortune 500 companies are creating what amounts to "an unlimited IRA for corporations," some of them paying no taxes whatsoever. The result? Vast amounts of lost revenue for our treasury and the exporting of much-needed jobs to other countries.
    "I think we can use our tax system to create a better society, to be an expression of our true values." Stiglitz tells Bill Moyers. "But if people don't think that their tax system is fair, they're not going to want to contribute. It's going to be difficult to get them to pay. And, unfortunately, right now, our tax system is neither fair nor efficient."
    Stiglitz continues, "We have a tax system that reflects not the interest of the middle. We have a tax system that reflects the interest of the 1%. What I want to do is create a tax system that has incentives to create jobs. And if you tell a corporation, 'Look, if you don't create jobs, you're taking out of our system, you're not putting anything back, you're going to pay a high tax. But if you put back into our system by investing, then you can get your tax rate down.' That seems to me common sense, particularly in a time like today, when 20 million Americans need a full-time job and can't get one."
    Joseph Stiglitz's best-selling books, including The Price of Inequality, The Trillion Dollar War and Freefall have shaped worldwide debates on globalization, income inequality and the role of government in the financial marketplace. He is currently a professor at Columbia University, a senior fellow at the Roosevelt Institute and president of the International Economic Association. Stiglitz served as chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers under President Bill Clinton, and as chief economist of the World Bank.
    duration 24:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 12:30 pm
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1739H] POPE FRANCIS MIDDLE EAST TRIP REPORT - Pope Francis led an historic visit to the Middle East May 24-26 that was filled with spontaneous gestures and dramatic calls for peace and interfaith understanding. Kim Lawton reports on the pope's trip and what people of faith hope will result from it. (new segment)
    PAKISTAN POLIO CAMPAIGN - The World Health Organization has warned that new polio outbreaks are rising in several areas, threatening recent successes in wiping out the crippling disease. Pakistan is one of the places where polio is endemic. Fred de Sam Lazaro reports from Karachi on that nation's efforts to vaccinate its public, including projects with Muslim imams to convince Pakistanis that vaccine programs are not spy operations and that they are consistent with Islam. (Originally aired October 2013)
    MORE MORMON MISSIONARIES - At a time when many Christian denominations continue to lose members, the number of people in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is going up steadily, from 3 million in 1970 to more than 15 million today, worldwide. One reason is new, lower age limits for both men and women who want to serve as missionaries. Lucky Severson reports that there are now more than 80,000 Mormon missionaries around the world trying to combat what one Mormon leader calls the "growing level of wickedness." (Originally aired December 2013)
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:00 pm
    QUEST [#702H] Lake Tahoe: Can We Save It? Lake Tahoe's clear, blue waters attract 3 million visitors to California and Nevada each year. But the lake is still paying the price of the rampant development that took place in the 1960s and now faces a new threat in climate change. Meet the small army of scientists and others who toil behind the scenes to turn back the clock to a time when you could see 100 feet down into the lake. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 1:30 pm
    BioCentury This Week [#322] duration 25:41   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    Civil War: The Untold Story [#105H] With Malice Toward None In the spring of 1864, General William Tecumseh Sherman's force of 100-thousand men marches from Chattanooga toward Atlanta, Georgia, the industrial hub of the Deep South. Twenty miles north of Atlanta, Sherman's army is soundly defeated at Kennesaw Mountain. Sherman's defeat combined with Grant's stalemate in Virginia, enrages a Northern electorate already weary of war. The presidential election is in November, and Abraham Lincoln's chances for a second term are dwindling by the day. The Democrats nominate George McClellan. The party's platform calls for a negotiated peace with the Confederacy in which slaveholders will be allowed to keep their property. If McClellan is elected, Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation will almost certainly be struck down. Though victorious at Kennesaw Mountain, the outnumbered Confederate Army falls back to a defensive position at Atlanta. After 6 weeks of bloody conflicts around Atlanta, Sherman wires Washington: "Atlanta is ours and fairly won." For the first time in the war, many in the North now believe victory can be achieved. Eight weeks later, the president defeats McClellan in a landslide. After the election, Sherman begins his March to the Sea. The largely unopposed march across Georgia to Savannah is a psychological blow to the Confederacy, and a stunning conclusion to the Western Theater. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 3:00 pm
    D-Day 360 D-Day was a logistical effort on a scale never seen before or since. On the day itself, 14,000 planes dropped 23,000 airborne troops behind German lines, and 5,000 ships delivered 30,000 military vehicles and 160,000 soldiers onto the beaches. Once on the shore, the troops had to negotiate six million mines buried in the sand, 500, 000 fearsome beach obstacles and hundreds of miles of barbed wire, while dodging the shells and bullets fired by half-a-million German defenders. This film takes advantage of LiDAR technology to re-create the landscape and allow viewers to switch effortlessly between the macro and the micro - pulling back for the big picture and zooming in to a close-up of a single soldier on the battlefield. duration 55:06   STEREO TVPG-V
  • 4:00 pm
    Long Road Home Exploring the impact of wartime Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), LONG ROAD HOME offers compelling stories of Pittsburgh-area military veterans of Vietnam, Korea and World War II still coming to terms with the emotional wounds of war. The film explores successful therapies and documents the promising research underway at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, where doctors study the sleep and brain patterns of PTSD sufferers and examine the reasons why women are twice as likely as men to develop the disorder. The program concludes on a hopeful note, with a visit to a weekend retreat for veterans dealing with PTSD and combat stress. United by their experiences, the former servicemen and women discuss their feelings, their struggles in civilian life, their need for closure and their optimism for the future. duration 58:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 pm
    Every Day Is A Holiday Chinese-American filmmaker Theresa Loong creates an intimate portrait of her father, a man fifty years her senior. Viewers explore the bonds of the father-daughter relationship and place themes of growing older, immigration and racism in the context of "living history." Paul Loong (American Legion member, retired Veterans Affairs doctor, practicing Catholic) talks of his experiences as a POW in Japan and his subsequent quest to become an American. We discover why, despite much suffering, "every day is a holiday." duration 56:41   STEREO TVG
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour Weekend [#177H] According to the USDA, 30% to 40% of the food produced in America goes uneaten. On Saturday, Mona Iskander reports from West Virginia on how new businesses have emerged to help kitchens reduce food waste while turning a profit. That, and the weekend's news, online and on-air. duration 24:10   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5348H] It has been a whirlwind week for President Obama: a surprise trip to Afghanistan just prior to announcing troop reductions in that conflict; a major speech on his vision for the military and the US role in the world; new calls to replace Veterans Affairs Secretary Eric Shinseki amid allegation of scandal and misconduct in VA hospitals around the country. In some respects, the week has been a microcosm of the types of situations that have defined and sometimes plagued Mr. Obama's second term. With upcoming mid-term elections - which are rarely hospitable to incumbent presidents - and a flagging legislative agenda ahead, how will he tackle the remaining 2-1/2 years of his presidency?
    This week, we take a look at the president's standing 18-months into his second term - his priorities, his stumbles and the potential obstacles ahead, both politically and internationally. Joining Gwen around the table to discuss Obama at a Crossroads: Peter Baker, New York Times; Christi Parsons, Tribune Newspapers; Michael Crowley, Time Magazine; and Carrie Budoff Brown, Politico.
    duration 24:10   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 pm
    KQED NEWSROOM [#129H] Legislating Public Safety, Congresswoman Jackie Speier and Maya Angelou Tribute
    Legislating Public Safety
    As the community of Isla Vista mourns, the deadly rampage last weekend has re-invigorated calls for legislative action. In Washington today, Rep. Mike Thompson (D-St Helena) introduced federal legislation to target mental health services and reduce gun violence. Earlier in the week, California Assembly members Nancy Skinner (D-Berkeley) and Das Williams (D-Santa Barbara) proposed bills to further restrict access to guns for people deemed mentally ill. Senate leader Darrell Steinberg announced a separate set of proposals to address mental health care in the criminal justice system and to expand training for law enforcement officers. Can legislation prevent would-be-killers before they go on rampages?

    Guests:
    • Frank Zimring, UC Berkeley School of Law
    • Josh Richman, Bay Area News Group
    • April Dembosky, KQED Health Reporter

    Further Reporting:
    Amid Warning Signs, Isla Vista Killer Slipped Through System
    Isla Vista Aftermath: Can Legislation Prevent Mass Shootings?

    Congresswoman Jackie Speier on Sexual Assault on College Campuses
    Colleges across the country are grappling with sexual violence against women on campuses - what a White House task force recently called an epidemic that affects one in five college women. Meanwhile, the Office of Civil Rights is investigating complaints from more than fifty campuses across the country, including UC Berkeley, which is also the subject of a state probe. Scott Shafer recently sat down with Bay Area Congresswoman Jackie Speier, who is expected to introduce legislation in the coming weeks to address the issue.

    Further Reporting:
    Speier Demands Accountability for Campus Sexual Assaults
    UC Berkeley Students Press for Stronger Action on Sexual Assaults

    Maya Angelou Tribute
    The world lost a cultural and civil rights icon this week, poet Maya Angelou, who died at 86. In her memory, we share an encore presentation from the KQED archives. Belva Davis, former host of KQED's This Week in Northern California, was a longtime friend of Angelou and visited with the author in 2012 to talk about the power and beauty of friendship.

    Further Reporting:
    Video: KQED's Belva Davis Recalls Her Friendship with Maya Angelou
    Maya Angelou: Remembering a Cultural Giant's Life in San Francisco
    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 7:30 pm
    QUEST [#702H] Lake Tahoe: Can We Save It? Lake Tahoe's clear, blue waters attract 3 million visitors to California and Nevada each year. But the lake is still paying the price of the rampant development that took place in the 1960s and now faces a new threat in climate change. Meet the small army of scientists and others who toil behind the scenes to turn back the clock to a time when you could see 100 feet down into the lake. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1308] Globe Trekker Food Hour: Story of Tea Trekkers Rosie Lovell, Peter Gordon, Bobby Chinn, Merrilees Parker, Megan McCormick, Holly Morris and Ben O'Donoghue uncover the story of how tea spread from China to capture the taste of the world. Visits to Southeast China, Japan, Taiwan, England, Bangladesh, India, Morocco and Myanmar provide historical context, a look at cultural traditions and rituals and what the future holds for this popular beverage. duration 56:42   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 9:00 pm
    Nature [#2603H] American Eagle Unique to North America, the bald eagle is the continent's most recognizable aerial predator, with a shocking white head, electric yellow beak and penetrating eyes. In the 1960s, this symbol of the United States became an emblem of environmental degradation as the pesticide DDT and other human pressures brought it to the brink of extinction. Following their protection as an endangered species, bald eagles have come roaring back. Photographed by Emmy-winning cinematographer Neil Rettig, this film focuses on the drama of the nest. Even in the best of times, it's a surprisingly tough struggle to maintain a one-ton home and raise chicks until they can hunt on their own. duration 55:16   SRND51 TVPG
  • 10:00 pm
    Nova [#4113H] D-Day's Sunken Secrets On June 6, 1944, the Allies launched the biggest armada in history to invade the Normandy beaches and liberate Europe from the Nazis. In less than 24 hours, more than 5000 ships crossed the English Channel, along with thousands of tanks and landing craft and nearly 200,000 men. Throughout the operation hundreds of ships sank running the gauntlet of mines and bunkers, creating one of the world's largest underwater archaeological sites. Now, Nova has exclusive access to a unique collaboration between military historians, archaeologists, and specialist divers to carry out the most extensive survey ever done of the seabed bordering the legendary beachheads. Dive teams, submersibles, and underwater robots discover and identify key examples of the Allied craft that fell victim to German shellfire, mines and torpedoes. The team uses the latest 3D mapping tools to plot the relics on the sea floor. Highlighting the ingenious technology that helped the Allies overcome the German defenses, "D-Day's Sunken Secrets" unfolds a vivid blow-by-blow account of the tumultuous events of D-Day and reveals how the Allies' intricate planning and advanced technology was vital to assure the success of the most ambitious and risky military operation ever launched. duration 1:55:21   STEREO TVPG
  • 12:00 am
    America Reframed [#221] Reserved to Fight In May 2003, Fox Company of Marine Reserve Unit 2/23 returned home from front-line combat in Iraq. Reserved To Fight follows four Marines of Fox Company for four years through their postwar minefield of social and psychological reintegration into civilian life. The return to their communities proves as formidable a battle as the more literal firefights of previous months. Living among loved ones who don't yet understand them and how they have changed, contending with a media focused on the politics rather than the human experience of war, and suffering from a psychological disorder that is difficult to acknowledge, these young veterans grapple to find purpose and healing. duration 1:23:27   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
Saturday, May 31, 2014

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TV Technical Issues

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    TV Technical Issues
    • Wed 10/15 morning: KQED Plus (KQEH) Over the Air signal down

      UPDATE: This problem has been resolved, and the OTA signal for the DT54 channels restored. (DT54.1 through 54.5) KQED Plus’ Over the Air transmission is currently off air via our KQEH transmitter on Monument Peak northeast of San Jose. Technicians are working on the problem. No current estimate regarding how long this will exist. We […]

    • KQET (DT25) Over the Air: Wed 8/27

      We are aware of the break-up issues for our DT25 Over the Air signal in the Monterey/Salinas area. This will also affect viewers of any cable or satellite signal provider using that transmitter as their source. Engineers are working on the problem.

    • Week of 8/25: Sutro Tower work (including KQED 9 Over the Air)

      (Affects several San Francisco TV & Radio stations, including KQED 9.1, 9.2 & 9.3) During the week of August 25, Monday through Friday, between 9am and 4pm, several TV and radio stations will be switching to their Auxiliary antennas. This is being done so that the tower crew can perform routine maintenance on the regular […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

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Digital 9.1, 54.2 or 25.1

All widescreen and HD programs

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KQED Life
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Digital 54.3

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Comcast 190
Digital 9.3

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Comcast 191 & 621
Digital 54.5 or 25.3

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Comcast 192
Digital 54.4

Quality children's programming parents love too