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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Sunday, May 25, 2014

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Sunday, May 25, 2014
  • 12:00 am
    America Reframed [#220] Dignity Harbor 1 of 9 documentary nominees for the 2012 Student Academy Award, this film chronicles a group of homeless people living in an encampment along the Mississippi River in downtown St. Louis. In the shadow of the Arch, several makeshift communities - Hopeville, Sparta,and Dignity Harbor - are erected when work begins to fill the tunnels under Tucker Boulevard, displacing many homeless. ,br>In this doc, the self-appointed mayor promises a safe environment - women are especially to be welcomed - and the residents work cooperatively to cut wood and build rudimentary shelters. But conflicts inevitably arise, tempers occasionally flare, and everyone struggles to survive the harsh St. Louis winter. Although the utopian dream finally dies for good when the city bulldozes the shantytowns, not all is lost, with several of the residents moving to more permanent housing. duration 56:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Humble Beauty: Skid Row Artists This program documents the ability of art to inspire and reveals how despite humble circumstances, people can strive to create art and at times even overcome life's adversities. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 2:00 am
    Teaching Channel Presents [#309] Elementary School Basics Follow along for a full hour with eager-to-learn elementary school students. From doing the "Monster Match" for English, to Decimal Games in Math, to exploring ecosystems in Science, these lessons are inviting and visual. duration 59:00   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Moyers & Company [#320H] Our Heritage of Racism Every once in a while, an article or book comes along that changes how we think and talk about race in America. So it is with the cover story in the new issue of The Atlantic magazine. Written by journalist Ta-Nahisi Coates, its provocative title is "The Case for Reparations," and it urges that we begin a national dialogue on whether the US should compensate African Americans not only as recognition of slavery's "ancient brutality" - as President Lyndon Johnson called it - but also as acknowledgement of all the prejudice and discrimination that have followed in a direct line from this, our original sin.
    "I am not asking you, as a white person, to see yourself as an enslaver," Coates explains to Bill Moyers. "I'm asking you as an American to see all of the freedoms that you enjoy and see how they are rooted in things that the country you belong to condoned or actively participated in in the past. And that covers everything from enslavement to the era of lynching, when we effectively decided that we weren't going to afford African Americans the same level of protection of the law. There are plenty of African Americans in this country - and I would say that this goes right up to the White House - who are not by any means poor, but are very much afflicted by white supremacy."
    Reparations, Coates says, are "what the US, first of all, really owes African Americans, but not far behind that, what it owes itself, because this is really about our health as a country. I firmly believe that reparation is a chance to be pioneers. We say we set all these examples about liberty and freedom and democracy and all that great stuff. Well, here's an opportunity for us to live that out."
    Ta-Nehisi Coates has written for many publications, including The New York Times and The Washington Post. He is a senior editor for The Atlantic magazine and author of the 2008 memoir, "The Beautiful Struggle: A Father, Two Sons, and an Unlikely Road to Manhood."
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 am
    Asia This Week [#406] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5347H] * The latest on alleged mismanagement of VA hospitals, the indictment of five Chinese Army officials over cyber spying, analysis Tuesday's primary elections and President Lyndon Johnson's call to make America a 'Great Society' fifty years later. Joining Gwen: Jeff Zeleny, ABC News; Pete Williams, NBC News; Susan Davis, USA Today; Karen Tumulty, Washington Post.
    * The House voted to end the NSA's practice of bulk collecting phone records. USA Today's Susan Davis details how they came to this decision. Pete Williams of NBC News talks about the growing number of states that have overturned bans on same-sex marriage across the country. President Obama nominated San Antonio Mayor Julian Castro to become secretary of the Department of Housing and Urban Development. ABC News' Jeff Zeleny examines the president's selection and discusses what's next for current HUD Secretary Shaun Donovan.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3222H] duration 27:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:00 am
    Charlie Rose - The Week [#145] * Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel * Paul Rieckhoff, founder and chief executive of Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America * Sheryl Gay Stolberg of the New York Times on the potential fallout from the scandal at the Veterans Administration * David Remnick on the Ukraine's presidential elections * Daniel Radcliffe discusses his role in the revival of "The Cripple of Inishmaan" duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:30 am
    Focus On Europe [#3221] Ukraine Elections: A New President A DIFFICULT VOTE IN UKRAINE - On May 25, Ukraine elects a new president. With eastern Ukraine on the brink of civil war, it's a difficult time to hold an election. Until recently, the eastern city of Kharkiv was taking a back seat to the crisis-torn region of Donetsk. But Kharkiv has moved into the spotlight since it hosted the second in a series of round table talks. Our reporter paid a visit to the city to find out how residents view the upcoming presidential election. How is Petro Poroshenko - the billionaire industrialist who stands a good chance of winning - faring there? How is the election commission preparing for the vote and what's the mood on the street? Our reporter also pays a visit to the embattled eastern city of Sloviansk, where the ballot may be derailed entirely.
    EUROPEAN ELECTIONS: OPPONENTS AND ALLIES - Politically, the two main candidates for the president of the European Commission have a lot in common. But are there any differences? The two top candidates for the post of European Commission president are Jean-Claude Juncker from Luxemburg and Martin Schulz from Germany. As the campaign heats up, they head for France, a country that is grappling with many problems. Though it is Europe's second largest economy, debt is rising, the far right is gaining in strength, and the government is lurching from one crisis to the next.
    THE YOUNG POLITICAL CANDIDATES IN SWEDEN AND SLOVENIA - It's not just veteran politicians who are standing for European elections. The younger generation also wants to play a role in shaping Europe's future. Amelia Andersdotter is the chair of the European Pirate Party and has been serving as a Member of European Parliament since 2011. Now the internet expert from Sweden is campaigning for a second term in the European Parliament. Another young candidate is Nezika Pavlic from Slovenia. She has no experience in Strasbourg and Brussels, but is hoping to represent the conservative Slovenian People's Party.
    TURKEY: PRIME MINSTER UNDER SIEGE - The worst mining disaster in Turkey's history has led to heightened criticism of Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan. Prime Minister Erdogan has faced sharp criticism from some quarters for months now, but the mining disaster in Soma has brought anger to a boil. Many in Turkey are furious at their leader and blame him for the deadly blast. Together with the Gezi Park protests and recent corruption scandals, this public outrage has put Erdogan on the political defensive. It is a serious setback to his expected presidential candidacy in Turkey's August elections.
    BRITAIN: HAPPY CHICKENS - It may not solve the riddle of why the chicken crossed the road, but now they'll be a bit safer when they do it. Britain loves its chickens, and many people keep them as pets in their gardens. Now a company has come up with an idea to keep them a bit safer from motorists - high-visibility vests that come in two neon colors. There's even a model that includes a body warmer.
    duration 26:10   STEREO TVG
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    America Reframed [#220] Dignity Harbor 1 of 9 documentary nominees for the 2012 Student Academy Award, this film chronicles a group of homeless people living in an encampment along the Mississippi River in downtown St. Louis. In the shadow of the Arch, several makeshift communities - Hopeville, Sparta,and Dignity Harbor - are erected when work begins to fill the tunnels under Tucker Boulevard, displacing many homeless. ,br>In this doc, the self-appointed mayor promises a safe environment - women are especially to be welcomed - and the residents work cooperatively to cut wood and build rudimentary shelters. But conflicts inevitably arise, tempers occasionally flare, and everyone struggles to survive the harsh St. Louis winter. Although the utopian dream finally dies for good when the city bulldozes the shantytowns, not all is lost, with several of the residents moving to more permanent housing. duration 56:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:00 am
    Focus On Europe [#3221] Ukraine Elections: A New President A DIFFICULT VOTE IN UKRAINE - On May 25, Ukraine elects a new president. With eastern Ukraine on the brink of civil war, it's a difficult time to hold an election. Until recently, the eastern city of Kharkiv was taking a back seat to the crisis-torn region of Donetsk. But Kharkiv has moved into the spotlight since it hosted the second in a series of round table talks. Our reporter paid a visit to the city to find out how residents view the upcoming presidential election. How is Petro Poroshenko - the billionaire industrialist who stands a good chance of winning - faring there? How is the election commission preparing for the vote and what's the mood on the street? Our reporter also pays a visit to the embattled eastern city of Sloviansk, where the ballot may be derailed entirely.
    EUROPEAN ELECTIONS: OPPONENTS AND ALLIES - Politically, the two main candidates for the president of the European Commission have a lot in common. But are there any differences? The two top candidates for the post of European Commission president are Jean-Claude Juncker from Luxemburg and Martin Schulz from Germany. As the campaign heats up, they head for France, a country that is grappling with many problems. Though it is Europe's second largest economy, debt is rising, the far right is gaining in strength, and the government is lurching from one crisis to the next.
    THE YOUNG POLITICAL CANDIDATES IN SWEDEN AND SLOVENIA - It's not just veteran politicians who are standing for European elections. The younger generation also wants to play a role in shaping Europe's future. Amelia Andersdotter is the chair of the European Pirate Party and has been serving as a Member of European Parliament since 2011. Now the internet expert from Sweden is campaigning for a second term in the European Parliament. Another young candidate is Nezika Pavlic from Slovenia. She has no experience in Strasbourg and Brussels, but is hoping to represent the conservative Slovenian People's Party.
    TURKEY: PRIME MINSTER UNDER SIEGE - The worst mining disaster in Turkey's history has led to heightened criticism of Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan. Prime Minister Erdogan has faced sharp criticism from some quarters for months now, but the mining disaster in Soma has brought anger to a boil. Many in Turkey are furious at their leader and blame him for the deadly blast. Together with the Gezi Park protests and recent corruption scandals, this public outrage has put Erdogan on the political defensive. It is a serious setback to his expected presidential candidacy in Turkey's August elections.
    BRITAIN: HAPPY CHICKENS - It may not solve the riddle of why the chicken crossed the road, but now they'll be a bit safer when they do it. Britain loves its chickens, and many people keep them as pets in their gardens. Now a company has come up with an idea to keep them a bit safer from motorists - high-visibility vests that come in two neon colors. There's even a model that includes a body warmer.
    duration 26:10   STEREO TVG
  • 7:30 am
    QUEST [#701H] Next Meal: Engineering Food Discover how genetically engineered crops are made, their pros and cons, and what the future might hold for research and regulations such as labeling. In a half-hour special, QUEST Northern California explores genetically engineered crops in the wake of Proposition 37, the November 2012 initiative that would have required foods containing genetically engineered ingredients to be labeled in California. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 am
    Asia Biz Forecast [#508] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1048] Great Investor Steven Romick A rare interview "Great Investor" Steven Romick (Portfolio Manager, FPA Crescent Fund), Morningstar's 2013 Allocation Fund Manager of the Year, on why he is holding large sums of cash in his FPA Crescent Fund. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 am
    Truth About Money with Ric Edelman [#312H] Financial advisor Ric Edelman says we're moving toward a greener economy, but will that transition be an easy one? Also U.S. healthcare is in the middle of a major transformation, and we're not talking about the Affordable Healthcare Act. Plus Ric says just because you CAN retire at 45 doesn't necessarily mean you SHOULD. All that and so much more on this edition of The Truth about Money with Ric Edelman. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:30 am
    Maria Hinojosa: One-On-One [#503H] Jose Hernandez Former NASA astronaut Jose Hernandez talks about his long journey from the dusty fields of California to the International Space Station. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 10:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3222H] duration 27:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5347H] * The latest on alleged mismanagement of VA hospitals, the indictment of five Chinese Army officials over cyber spying, analysis Tuesday's primary elections and President Lyndon Johnson's call to make America a 'Great Society' fifty years later. Joining Gwen: Jeff Zeleny, ABC News; Pete Williams, NBC News; Susan Davis, USA Today; Karen Tumulty, Washington Post.
    * The House voted to end the NSA's practice of bulk collecting phone records. USA Today's Susan Davis details how they came to this decision. Pete Williams of NBC News talks about the growing number of states that have overturned bans on same-sex marriage across the country. President Obama nominated San Antonio Mayor Julian Castro to become secretary of the Department of Housing and Urban Development. ABC News' Jeff Zeleny examines the president's selection and discusses what's next for current HUD Secretary Shaun Donovan.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    Hunger in the Valley of Plenty California's San Joaquin Valley is one of the most productive farm regions on the planet. Yet the people who work and live near those farms can't always access that bounty. duration 27:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 11:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#320H] Our Heritage of Racism Every once in a while, an article or book comes along that changes how we think and talk about race in America. So it is with the cover story in the new issue of The Atlantic magazine. Written by journalist Ta-Nahisi Coates, its provocative title is "The Case for Reparations," and it urges that we begin a national dialogue on whether the US should compensate African Americans not only as recognition of slavery's "ancient brutality" - as President Lyndon Johnson called it - but also as acknowledgement of all the prejudice and discrimination that have followed in a direct line from this, our original sin.
    "I am not asking you, as a white person, to see yourself as an enslaver," Coates explains to Bill Moyers. "I'm asking you as an American to see all of the freedoms that you enjoy and see how they are rooted in things that the country you belong to condoned or actively participated in in the past. And that covers everything from enslavement to the era of lynching, when we effectively decided that we weren't going to afford African Americans the same level of protection of the law. There are plenty of African Americans in this country - and I would say that this goes right up to the White House - who are not by any means poor, but are very much afflicted by white supremacy."
    Reparations, Coates says, are "what the US, first of all, really owes African Americans, but not far behind that, what it owes itself, because this is really about our health as a country. I firmly believe that reparation is a chance to be pioneers. We say we set all these examples about liberty and freedom and democracy and all that great stuff. Well, here's an opportunity for us to live that out."
    Ta-Nehisi Coates has written for many publications, including The New York Times and The Washington Post. He is a senior editor for The Atlantic magazine and author of the 2008 memoir, "The Beautiful Struggle: A Father, Two Sons, and an Unlikely Road to Manhood."
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1738] POPE FRANCIS MIDDLE EAST TRIP - This weekend Pope Francis makes a pilgrimage to the region Christians call "the Holy Land" to meet with Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew and to try to reinforce the unity of Western and Eastern Christians. But he will also engage Jewish, Christian and Muslim religious leaders and address issues such as the diminishing number of Christians in the region and the Israeli-Palestinian peace process. "This pope," says Haris Tarin of the Muslim Public Affairs Council, "can remind the region that dignity and peace and living together in harmony is in essence what the peace process should be about."
    RELIGIOUS FREEDOM IN MISSISSIPPI - Baptist pastor and Mississippi state senator Phillip Gandy recently sponsored and the legislature passed a religious freedom restoration act "to protect people of faith from having their religious freedoms violated," says Gandy. But others see it as an attempt to legalize discrimination under the pretext of religion, or to insulate the state's Christian residents from the changes in LGBT civil rights occurring across the country. "It's aiming at keeping government in its place," Gandy explains. But National Council of Churches president and general secretary Jim Winkler describes it as "a rearguard action by those concerned by changes taking place in society."
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:30 pm
    QUEST [#701H] Next Meal: Engineering Food Discover how genetically engineered crops are made, their pros and cons, and what the future might hold for research and regulations such as labeling. In a half-hour special, QUEST Northern California explores genetically engineered crops in the wake of Proposition 37, the November 2012 initiative that would have required foods containing genetically engineered ingredients to be labeled in California. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 1:00 pm
    Miller Center's American Forum [#2109] The Greatest Generation? America's Uncertain Entry in WWII Lynne Olson and Richard Moe discuss the years just before World War II, the rancorous internal squabbles that gripped the US in the period leading up to Pearl Harbor, and FDR's fateful decision to seek a third term. Their books, Olson's Those Angry Days: Roosevelt, Lindbergh, and America's Fight Over World War II, 1939-1941 and Moe's Roosevelt's Second Act: The Election of 1940 and the Politics of War, remind us that the "greatest generation" was far more divided about WWII than popular mythology suggests - and offers lessons for American perspectives on foreign engagements today. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1307] Central Japan Megan's journey begins in Kyoto, where she explores the city's best flea market, meditates with a Buddhist monk, is entertained by geishas at a banquet and visits both the Fushimi Inari Shinto Shrine and the Toji Buddhist Temple, a World Heritage site. Then it's off to Osaka, where she visits a Cat Cafe and the Kidzania theme park. Megan travels to the home of the Ninja at Iga-Ueno, visits the site of a famous Samurai battle in Sekigahara, sails to the remote island of Sado and witnesses the dramatic Nada Fighting Festival in Himeji. duration 57:22   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 3:00 pm
    Nature [#3112H] The Gathering Swarms This program looks at some of the most extraordinary swarms on the planet, including a view from inside a locust swarm, mayflies along the Mississippi, 17-year cicadas, and brine fly hatches over Lake Victoria. Superswarms of finch-like quelea in Africa merit attempts at control through assaults on their roosts, while aggressive swarms of silver carp in North American seem able to overcome any kind of restraint. Dangerous swarms of killer bees, however, can be controlled to the point that they can be worn as a human bee suit. But beyond the power of sheer numbers, increasingly complex and organized swarms eventually give rise to swarm intelligence that allows complex decisions to be made. duration 55:16   SRND51 TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 4:00 pm
    Nova [#3902H] Bombing Hitler's Dams In 1943 a squadron of Lancaster bombers staged one of the most audacious raids in history -- destroying two gigantic dams in Germany's industrial heartland and cutting the water supply to arms factories -- with a revolutionary bouncing bomb invented by British engineer Barnes Wallis. Wallis and the pilots of 617 Squadron -- a lively mix of Britons, Australians, Americans and Canadians -- were hailed as heroes and dealt a mighty blow to the German war machine. In this program, NOVA recreates the extreme engineering challenges faced by Wallis and the pilots with the aid of six spectacular experiments. A crack team of experts including dam engineers, explosives specialists, mechanics and aircrew step into the shoes of the Dambusters and attempt to overcome each obstacle in turn. duration 1:55:01   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour Weekend [#176H] Included: With obesity levels rivaling those seen in the US, Mexico has launched a rigorous campaign to combat the epidemic, including taxes on sugary drinks and other high-calorie snack foods. We explore how well the strategy is working. What lessons can US policy makers learn from their Mexican counterparts? That, and the weekend's news, online and on-air. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Hunger in the Valley of Plenty California's San Joaquin Valley is one of the most productive farm regions on the planet. Yet the people who work and live near those farms can't always access that bounty. duration 27:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 7:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#320H] Our Heritage of Racism Every once in a while, an article or book comes along that changes how we think and talk about race in America. So it is with the cover story in the new issue of The Atlantic magazine. Written by journalist Ta-Nahisi Coates, its provocative title is "The Case for Reparations," and it urges that we begin a national dialogue on whether the US should compensate African Americans not only as recognition of slavery's "ancient brutality" - as President Lyndon Johnson called it - but also as acknowledgement of all the prejudice and discrimination that have followed in a direct line from this, our original sin.
    "I am not asking you, as a white person, to see yourself as an enslaver," Coates explains to Bill Moyers. "I'm asking you as an American to see all of the freedoms that you enjoy and see how they are rooted in things that the country you belong to condoned or actively participated in in the past. And that covers everything from enslavement to the era of lynching, when we effectively decided that we weren't going to afford African Americans the same level of protection of the law. There are plenty of African Americans in this country - and I would say that this goes right up to the White House - who are not by any means poor, but are very much afflicted by white supremacy."
    Reparations, Coates says, are "what the US, first of all, really owes African Americans, but not far behind that, what it owes itself, because this is really about our health as a country. I firmly believe that reparation is a chance to be pioneers. We say we set all these examples about liberty and freedom and democracy and all that great stuff. Well, here's an opportunity for us to live that out."
    Ta-Nehisi Coates has written for many publications, including The New York Times and The Washington Post. He is a senior editor for The Atlantic magazine and author of the 2008 memoir, "The Beautiful Struggle: A Father, Two Sons, and an Unlikely Road to Manhood."
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:30 pm
    Local USA [#119] Building An Identity As the Asian American population in the United States rises, so do their questions about their place in America; a Japanese-Filipino man narrates the story of his "becoming American"; a group of mixed race professionals is New York address issues of identity and acceptance; and new mothers try to balance their old heritage with their new culture. duration 28:14   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:00 pm
    Local USA [#104] Head Trauma at War Traumatic brain injuries, or TBI, has received increasing attention especially among athletes and soldiers returning from combat in Iraq and Afghanistan. We examine the links between TBI and post-traumatic stress disorder, and the damage they can do, through the story of retired Army sergeant Andrew Reeves of Colchester, Vermont. duration 26:52   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:30 pm
    Local USA [#111] Urban Gardening Sowing the Seeds of Change... planting ideas for sustainability and self-sufficiency. You might think of it as a Midwest rust belt town, but community gardeners in Flint, Michigan are undergoing a variety of projects and planting the seeds of hope for economic revitalization. From green belts to green thumbs -- a couple works with children to hone their martial arts and gardening skills; and two women toil with the local Flint government to get their garden growing. duration 27:18   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:00 pm
    Nature [#3112H] The Gathering Swarms This program looks at some of the most extraordinary swarms on the planet, including a view from inside a locust swarm, mayflies along the Mississippi, 17-year cicadas, and brine fly hatches over Lake Victoria. Superswarms of finch-like quelea in Africa merit attempts at control through assaults on their roosts, while aggressive swarms of silver carp in North American seem able to overcome any kind of restraint. Dangerous swarms of killer bees, however, can be controlled to the point that they can be worn as a human bee suit. But beyond the power of sheer numbers, increasingly complex and organized swarms eventually give rise to swarm intelligence that allows complex decisions to be made. duration 55:16   SRND51 TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 10:00 pm
    Pioneers of Television [#404] Acting Funny This episode peeks behind the curtain to reveal the backstage techniques of America's favorite comedic actors. The program features the manic improvisational style of Robin Williams, along with his comic predecessor Jonathan Winters. They're a fascinating contrast to Tina Fey, who explains her measured, highly prepared approach. The episode also highlights the all-time #1 Emmy winner for comedy acting: Cloris Leachman. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 11:00 pm
    Global Voices [#508] Stranded: The Andes Plane Crash Survivors On Friday, October 13, in 1972, charter flight 571 took off from Montevideo, Uruguay's capital city, carrying a boisterous team of wealthy college athletes to a rugby match in Chile. But what was supposed to be a first taste of freedom away from home turned out to be a much scarier and life-altering journey.
    This program is the tale of flight 571, which never made it to Chile. Instead, the plane crash-landed in a desolate glacial valley, high in the Andean cordillera - a chain of rugged, snow-covered peaks stretching from Bogata, Colombia to Punta Arenas, Chile. Fifteen people died, including the pilot. 5 were badly wounded. But - miracle of miracles - 29 lived.
    3 decades after the crash, the 16 survivors, interviewed in the film, revive long-buried emotions and intimate memories. They take viewers, moment by agonizing moment, through their suffering, as hope turns into despair and as hours stretch into days and weeks. And finally, just before disbelief hardens into bitterness and fear turns to madness, the unexpected happens.
    With death by starvation drawing ever nearer, the survivors arrive at a universal conclusion - that in order to live, they must break a taboo: They must find their nourishment in the flesh of their teammates who have died alongside them in the snowy wilderness. The group closes ranks around the terrible, life-saving decision: a decision that sustains them over the 72-day odyssey and helps them fuse into a single organism dedicated to one purpose - survival.
    duration 1:52:52   STEREO
Sunday, May 25, 2014

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TV Technical Issues

TV
    TV Technical Issues
    • KQET (DT25) Over the Air: Wed 8/27

      We are aware of the break-up issues for our DT25 Over the Air signal in the Monterey/Salinas area. This will also affect viewers of any cable or satellite signal provider using that transmitter as their source. Engineers are working on the problem.

    • Week of 8/25: Sutro Tower work (including KQED 9 Over the Air)

      (Affects several San Francisco TV & Radio stations, including KQED 9.1, 9.2 & 9.3) During the week of August 25, Monday through Friday, between 9am and 4pm, several TV and radio stations will be switching to their Auxiliary antennas. This is being done so that the tower crew can perform routine maintenance on the regular […]

    • KQET Off Air Sun 8/03 morning

      (DT25.1, 25.2, 25.3) KQET DT25 was off the air for a portion of Sunday morning, due to the transmitter taking a power hit. The signal has been restored. Most receivers should have re-acquired our signal once it returned, but a few Over the Air viewers may need to do a rescan in order to restore […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Comcast 9 and 709
Digital 9.1, 54.2 or 25.1

All widescreen and HD programs

KQED Plus

Channel 54
Comcast 10 and 710
Digital 9.2, 54.1 or 25.2

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

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KQED Life
Comcast 189
Digital 54.3

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

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KQED World
Comcast 190
Digital 9.3

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Comcast 191 & 621
Digital 54.5 or 25.3

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Comcast 192
Digital 54.4

Quality children's programming parents love too