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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Saturday, May 10, 2014

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, May 10, 2014
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10925] * Ukraine * #Bringbackourgirls * Overprotected kids * Shields & Brooks * Governor Jerry Brown duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#33093H] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, Apple is reportedly in talks to make its largest acquisition ever, buying Beats Electronics for more than $3b. Why? And what does it mean for Apple's strategy? And, our Market Monitor guest has a list of cheap stocks he says could soar 50%in the next 12 to 18 months. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#3199Z] Tavis talks with New Jersey's Sen. Robert Menendez, chair of the foreign relations committee. One of only three Hispanics in the US Senate, he weighs in on US policy, including on Egypt, Ukraine and immigration. Tavis also chats with Hannibal star Hugh Dancy. The British actor previews the second season of his series, and his role as an FBI criminal profiler. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 2:00 am
    Nazi Mega Weapons [#102H] U-Boat Base To create a haven in port for their lethal U-boat submarines, the Nazis built massive, impenetrable concrete submarine pens. Structures too immense to be hidden, they were constructed to withstand direct hits from even the biggest Allied bombs. Such was their size and strength that these pens survive today, a testament to their engineering. duration 54:01   SRND51 TVPG
  • 3:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1736] WORLD-WIDE ABUSE OF WOMEN AND GIRLS - Former President Jimmy Carter says unequal pay, domestic violence, rape on college campuses, sexual slavery, genital mutilation and the killing of girl babies make the abuse and exploitation of women and girls the gravest human rights issue on earth. He also tells Bob Faw that one of the causes of the scourge is the misreading of scripture.
    JORDAN RIVER BAPTISM SITE - Final preparations are underway for Pope Francis' visit to the Holy Land, May 24-26. During his brief stop in Jordan, the pope has invited Syrian refugees and disabled young people to join him for a meal at the Jordan River Baptism site. Located near the Dead Sea across the border from Israel, the site is revered by many Christians as the place where John the Baptist lived and where Jesus was baptized. Although there are other baptism sites inside Israel, archeological ruins dating back to the 5th century were discovered here after the 1994 peace treaty between Jordan and Israel. The area has now been opened for pilgrims and tourists. Kim Lawton recently visited Jordan's baptism site and tells its story.
    THE DEATH PENALTY - In the aftermath of the botched Oklahoma execution, Bob Abernethy talks with long-time legal affairs correspondent Tim O'Brien about the arguments for and against the death penalty. Also, the implications of the Supreme Court's decision allowing sectarian prayer before public town meetings.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1046] Christopher Davis: Third Generation Investor A rare interview with third-generation "Great Investor" Christopher Davis (Portfolio Manager, The Davis Funds) on the family's winning strategy of owning businesses not stocks. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2309H] * Nigerian Girls Abducted and US Response * Teen Pregnancy Rates at an All-time Low * Behind the Headlines: Infertility Treatments
    Panelists: Ritu Sharma of Women Thrive Worldwide; Republican Strategist Rina Shah; Host of Focus Point Avis Jones DeWeever; Republican Strategist Bettina Inclan.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    Asian Voices [#301] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    Global Voices [#613] A Village Called Versailles The incredible story of this little-known, tight-knit community in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. When the storm devastated New Orleans in August 2005, Versailles residents rebuilt their neighborhood faster than any other damaged neighborhood in the city, only to find themselves threatened by a new toxic landfill slated to open just two miles away. Forced out of Vietnam by the war 30 years ago, many residents felt their homes were being taken away from them once again. duration 56:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    Mr. Cao Goes to Washington What happens when the naivete of a political rookie clashes with the realities of racial and partisan politics of the South? This film is a character study of Congressman Joseph Cao, a Vietnamese American Republican elected by surprise in an African American Democratic district in New Orleans. Will Cao make it through his term with his idealism intact? duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1736] WORLD-WIDE ABUSE OF WOMEN AND GIRLS - Former President Jimmy Carter says unequal pay, domestic violence, rape on college campuses, sexual slavery, genital mutilation and the killing of girl babies make the abuse and exploitation of women and girls the gravest human rights issue on earth. He also tells Bob Faw that one of the causes of the scourge is the misreading of scripture.
    JORDAN RIVER BAPTISM SITE - Final preparations are underway for Pope Francis' visit to the Holy Land, May 24-26. During his brief stop in Jordan, the pope has invited Syrian refugees and disabled young people to join him for a meal at the Jordan River Baptism site. Located near the Dead Sea across the border from Israel, the site is revered by many Christians as the place where John the Baptist lived and where Jesus was baptized. Although there are other baptism sites inside Israel, archeological ruins dating back to the 5th century were discovered here after the 1994 peace treaty between Jordan and Israel. The area has now been opened for pilgrims and tourists. Kim Lawton recently visited Jordan's baptism site and tells its story.
    THE DEATH PENALTY - In the aftermath of the botched Oklahoma execution, Bob Abernethy talks with long-time legal affairs correspondent Tim O'Brien about the arguments for and against the death penalty. Also, the implications of the Supreme Court's decision allowing sectarian prayer before public town meetings.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#318H] Time to Get Real On Climate Change As the White House issues a frightening National Climate Assessment reporting that global warming is real and that "summers are longer and hotter than any living American has ever experienced," Bill Moyers talks with a scientist who has sounded the alarm for decades.
    For nearly 35 years, David Suzuki has brought science into the homes of millions on the Canadian television series, The Nature of Things. Along the way he has become a godfather of the environmental movement, and in a poll of his fellow Canadians last fall he was named that country's most admired figure. Nonetheless, his outspoken views on climate change and the government's collusion with the petrochemical industry in developing the Canada's oil-rich tar sands have made him the target of relentless attacks from his nation's prime minister, corporations, and right-wing ideologues.
    "We've failed to shift the perceptual lenses through which we see our place on the planet," Suzuki tells Moyers. "We thought if we stop that dam, whoa, we've won, that's it. But we didn't point out why we are stopping the dam. We just saw the battle as the issue. And we never saw it as simply part of the symptoms of a greater change that's needed. The challenge of environmentalism is really about seeing our place in the world in the way that humans have always known up until very, very recently - that we're part of nature and utterly dependent on the natural world for our wellbeing and survival."
    Suzuki believes that the current situation is not hopeless but says, "Our politicians should be thrown in the slammer for willful blindness. I think that we are being willfully blind to the consequences for our children and grandchildren. It's an intergenerational crime."
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 8:00 am
    LinkAsia [#246] duration 26:46   STEREO
  • 8:30 am
    This American Land [#305] Backyard Wilderness, Switchgrass Biofuel, Restoring Native Plants In Iowa and Tennessee, we see a new energy future where gas comes from grass. Researchers are working with different types of grasses and other cellulosic plant material, learning more about what it's going to take to grow our own fuel. In the first of a series of stories about the biofuel revolution, host Bruce Burkhardt takes us to the frontlines where farmers grow switchgrass, sourgum and miscanthus specifically as renewable fuel sources. Unlike most wilderness areas that are remote and hard to access, the San Gabriel Mountains are within easy reach of the Los Angeles urban sprawl. Less than an hour from downtown, the San Gabriels are home to alpine forests, chaparral hills, clear trout-filled streams and the often snow-capped 10,068-foot Mt. Baldy, L.A. County's tallest peak. Most of the range is in the Angeles National Forest, which gives L.A. County more than one-third of its drinking water, 70 percent of its open space, and scenic and critical natural habitat. The mountains are now the centerpiece of an imaginative plan for a 600,000-acre national recreation area with large portions of the National Forest, 36,000 acres of additional wilderness, 44 miles of wild and scenic rivers and creeks, and park-poor lower river urban areas, an idea that would bond L.A.'s 17 million residents even closer to the natural wonders in their backyard. Many students in the frontier-like setting of Kanab, Utah are from families who have been in the region for generations. But some are learning for the first time the importance of protecting native plants, tackling invasive species, and coming up with a balance for the human needs of farming and raising livestock. Targeting the invasive-threatened and protein-rich "winter fat" plant, they harvested seeds, sprouted them in their high school greenhouse, then transplanted them to an acre-sized test exclosure in the magnificent Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument. With instruction from experts, they mapped each plant with portable GPS devices so they could track their progress. Western wildfires can move swiftly and leave massive destruction. Researchers also have to move quickly, after a fire, to begin the restoration of water and wildlife in these ecosystems. We see how some powerful new tools are making their job a little easier. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:00 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5345H] * The international outcry over the kidnapping of nearly 300 schoolgirls in Nigeria continues to grow. The government of Nigeria has received offers of assistance from the US, China and other countries as it tries to find the girls who were abducted from their classrooms last month by the militant Islamic group, Boko Haram. Hannah Allam of McClatchy News will have the latest on the terrorist group that has claimed responsibility and the efforts to rescue the girls before they are sold into presumably forced marriages or slavery.
    * The White House released a new report this week on climate change that warns of more extended heat waves, rising sea levels, torrential rains, as well as threats to public health. In addition, there are signs that President Obama will step up his efforts to combat climate issues. Coral Davenport of The New York Times will report on the dramatic consequences happening now and what can be expected in the coming decades according to the new report. < br>* Tuesday's primary elections marked the unofficial launch of the 2014 midterm election season. Dan Balz of The Washington Post will have a roundup of early primaries and explain why establishment Republicans are energized by the defeat of conservative tea party candidates.
    * The Supreme Court, citing history and tradition, upheld prayer at government meetings this week. Pete Williams of NBC News will explain the 5-4 ruling that prayers at public meetings are not a violation of the First Amendment, which requires the separation of church and state.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:30 am
    KQED NEWSROOM [#127H] Politics Roundup, Jose Antonio Vargas' "Documented" and A Photographer On A Mission
    California Politics Roundup
    President Obama's three-day swing through California this week raised buckets of campaign cash in Silicon Valley and Hollywood, with the goal of helping Democrats hold onto the U.S. Senate in November. Meanwhile, the California primary election on June 3 has longtime South Bay Congressman Mike Honda facing stiff competition from a fellow Democrat with high tech ties -- newcomer Ro Khanna. The Governor's race has two Republicans vying to stop Jerry Brown from winning an unprecedented fourth term. Scott Shafer has an election roundup with three political reporters.

    Guests:
    •Carla Marinucci, San Francisco Chronicle
    •Josh Richman, Bay Area News Group
    •Scott Detrow, KQED Sacramento Bureau

    Further Reporting:
    A Guide to California's June 2014 Primary Ballot Measures
    President Obama at Wal-Mart to Talk About Solar Power
    Mike Honda, Ro Khanna Face Off Ahead of June Primary

    "Documented" filmmaker Jose Antonio Vargas
    Jose Antonio Vargas was twelve years old when his mother sent him from the Philippines to live in the Bay Area with his grandparents. After graduating from Mountain View High School, his career as a journalist took off, but Vargas was troubled by the secret of his status as an undocumented immigrant. As he watched students and activists around the country push for the passage of the Dream Act in 2010, Vargas decided to get involved himself. His story is told through his new film, "Documented," opening in select Bay Area theaters on May 16. Thuy Vu sits down with Vargas to hear about the film and his story.

    A Photographer On A Mission
    California Air National Guardsman Ed Drew is the first photographer since the American Civil War to make tintype portraits of soldiers in a combat zone. Now he's turning his lens on an inspirational group of at-risk youth who are making a better life for themselves through organic farming.

    Further Reporting:
    Photographer on a Mission Uses 19th-Century Technique to Make Timeless Images
    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 10:00 am
    BBC Newsnight [#17129Z] duration 28:18   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2309H] * Nigerian Girls Abducted and US Response * Teen Pregnancy Rates at an All-time Low * Behind the Headlines: Infertility Treatments
    Panelists: Ritu Sharma of Women Thrive Worldwide; Republican Strategist Rina Shah; Host of Focus Point Avis Jones DeWeever; Republican Strategist Bettina Inclan.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3220H] duration 27:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Charlie Rose - The Week [#143H] * Climate change with Jim Rogers, the former Chairman and CEO of Duke Energy * Mike Allen of Politico on the week in politics * Lynne Cheney on her book James Madison - A Life Reconsidered * The Broadway revival of Lorraine Hansberry's A Raisin in the Sun with Denzel Washington, LaTanya Richardson Jackson, Anika Noni Rose, and Sophie Okonedo * Louis C.K. on season three of his FX series Louie duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#318H] Time to Get Real On Climate Change As the White House issues a frightening National Climate Assessment reporting that global warming is real and that "summers are longer and hotter than any living American has ever experienced," Bill Moyers talks with a scientist who has sounded the alarm for decades.
    For nearly 35 years, David Suzuki has brought science into the homes of millions on the Canadian television series, The Nature of Things. Along the way he has become a godfather of the environmental movement, and in a poll of his fellow Canadians last fall he was named that country's most admired figure. Nonetheless, his outspoken views on climate change and the government's collusion with the petrochemical industry in developing the Canada's oil-rich tar sands have made him the target of relentless attacks from his nation's prime minister, corporations, and right-wing ideologues.
    "We've failed to shift the perceptual lenses through which we see our place on the planet," Suzuki tells Moyers. "We thought if we stop that dam, whoa, we've won, that's it. But we didn't point out why we are stopping the dam. We just saw the battle as the issue. And we never saw it as simply part of the symptoms of a greater change that's needed. The challenge of environmentalism is really about seeing our place in the world in the way that humans have always known up until very, very recently - that we're part of nature and utterly dependent on the natural world for our wellbeing and survival."
    Suzuki believes that the current situation is not hopeless but says, "Our politicians should be thrown in the slammer for willful blindness. I think that we are being willfully blind to the consequences for our children and grandchildren. It's an intergenerational crime."
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 12:30 pm
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1736] WORLD-WIDE ABUSE OF WOMEN AND GIRLS - Former President Jimmy Carter says unequal pay, domestic violence, rape on college campuses, sexual slavery, genital mutilation and the killing of girl babies make the abuse and exploitation of women and girls the gravest human rights issue on earth. He also tells Bob Faw that one of the causes of the scourge is the misreading of scripture.
    JORDAN RIVER BAPTISM SITE - Final preparations are underway for Pope Francis' visit to the Holy Land, May 24-26. During his brief stop in Jordan, the pope has invited Syrian refugees and disabled young people to join him for a meal at the Jordan River Baptism site. Located near the Dead Sea across the border from Israel, the site is revered by many Christians as the place where John the Baptist lived and where Jesus was baptized. Although there are other baptism sites inside Israel, archeological ruins dating back to the 5th century were discovered here after the 1994 peace treaty between Jordan and Israel. The area has now been opened for pilgrims and tourists. Kim Lawton recently visited Jordan's baptism site and tells its story.
    THE DEATH PENALTY - In the aftermath of the botched Oklahoma execution, Bob Abernethy talks with long-time legal affairs correspondent Tim O'Brien about the arguments for and against the death penalty. Also, the implications of the Supreme Court's decision allowing sectarian prayer before public town meetings.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 pm
    QUEST [#705H] Restoring America's Waters Find out how the health of America's waterways is being restored. Follow scientists and fishermen as they team up to rebuild North Carolina's deteriorating oyster reefs. Battle algae blooms with Lake Erie researchers and discover how the largest dam removal project in U.S. history is providing hope for Washington state's salmon. Plus, discover an Ohio artist who turns coal mine run-off into works of art. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 1:30 pm
    BioCentury This Week [#319] duration 25:41   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    Civil War: The Untold Story [#102] A Beacon of Hope In the disaster at Shiloh, Union General Ulysses S. Grant sees victory. On the night of April 6, 1862, Grant's beleaguered army along the Tennessee River is reinforced. The next morning, Grant's counterattack leads to victory. The defeated Confederate force of 40-thousand retreats south to Corinth, Mississippi. At Shiloh, the Confederates lose arguably their best opportunity to change the outcome of the war. The shocking combined casualties of 24-thousand men is more than in all the wars fought to that date in the United States. Many of the nearly 4 million slaves across the South see the war as an opportunity to seize their own destiny. Thousands of escaping slaves, dubbed 'contrabands', seek refuge with Union forces advancing into the South. At Corinth, Mississippi, the Union army sets up a 'contraband camp.' The former slaves begin building a community that includes a school, hospital, and church. As thousands of slaves flee northward, the question asked all over America is this: are they still slaves or are they now free? In a cottage overlooking Washington DC, Abraham Lincoln begins drafting a "proclamation" whose message will boldly answer that question. duration 55:30   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 pm
    Rescue in the Philippines: Refuge from the Holocaust This documentary recounts a fascinating, yet seldom-told, chapter in World War II history. It chronicles a real-life Casablanca, in which a high-profile group of poker buddies - including Colonel Dwight Eisenhower - hatched an intricate international plan of rescue and re-settlement, saving 1300 Jews from certain death in Nazi concentration camps. The program tells this gripping story through interviews with historians, friends and relatives of the key participants, and first-person accounts from refugees who detail their harrowing escape from Europe and immigration to the Philippines. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 pm
    Secrets of the Dead [#1002] Deadliest Battle Germany's invasion of the Soviet Union in 1941 was the largest troop offensive in military history. And the Battle of Stalingrad is arguably the deadliest single battle the world has ever seen. The eventual Russian victory has long been lauded as a shining example of Stalin's military genius. He is said to have baited a much more powerful and technologically advanced German army with a carefully executed withdrawal, then caught the Nazis unprepared in a vicious city-block-by-city-block counterattack that decimated the German forces. By the time the battle was over, more than 1 million lives had been lost and the course of the war had been permanently altered. But 70 years after the battle was fought, newly uncovered documents, survivor accounts, and stunning archival footage are revealing a very different picture of a forced retreat, not a tactical one, and of fiercer fighting in the countryside that has previously been suggested. Secrets of the Dead: Deadliest Battle tells the true story of the battle that turned World War II, and established the Soviet Union as a world superpower for the looming Cold War. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 pm
    Nazi Mega Weapons [#105H] Jet Fighter Me262 Explore the most technologically advanced plane of World War II, the Messerschmitt Me262, a fighter jet that inspired a revolution in aerial warfare. Learn the remarkable story of an awe-inspiring aircraft, the subterranean bat-cave where it was built and the battle for air supremacy that decided the fate of the war. duration 56:46   SRND51 TVPG-V
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour Weekend [#171H] Included: a report from Australia about an initiative that has raised organ donation and transplant rates dramatically. Could the same program work in the US? That, and the weekend's news, online and on-air. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5345H] * The international outcry over the kidnapping of nearly 300 schoolgirls in Nigeria continues to grow. The government of Nigeria has received offers of assistance from the US, China and other countries as it tries to find the girls who were abducted from their classrooms last month by the militant Islamic group, Boko Haram. Hannah Allam of McClatchy News will have the latest on the terrorist group that has claimed responsibility and the efforts to rescue the girls before they are sold into presumably forced marriages or slavery.
    * The White House released a new report this week on climate change that warns of more extended heat waves, rising sea levels, torrential rains, as well as threats to public health. In addition, there are signs that President Obama will step up his efforts to combat climate issues. Coral Davenport of The New York Times will report on the dramatic consequences happening now and what can be expected in the coming decades according to the new report. < br>* Tuesday's primary elections marked the unofficial launch of the 2014 midterm election season. Dan Balz of The Washington Post will have a roundup of early primaries and explain why establishment Republicans are energized by the defeat of conservative tea party candidates.
    * The Supreme Court, citing history and tradition, upheld prayer at government meetings this week. Pete Williams of NBC News will explain the 5-4 ruling that prayers at public meetings are not a violation of the First Amendment, which requires the separation of church and state.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 pm
    KQED NEWSROOM [#127H] Politics Roundup, Jose Antonio Vargas' "Documented" and A Photographer On A Mission
    California Politics Roundup
    President Obama's three-day swing through California this week raised buckets of campaign cash in Silicon Valley and Hollywood, with the goal of helping Democrats hold onto the U.S. Senate in November. Meanwhile, the California primary election on June 3 has longtime South Bay Congressman Mike Honda facing stiff competition from a fellow Democrat with high tech ties -- newcomer Ro Khanna. The Governor's race has two Republicans vying to stop Jerry Brown from winning an unprecedented fourth term. Scott Shafer has an election roundup with three political reporters.

    Guests:
    •Carla Marinucci, San Francisco Chronicle
    •Josh Richman, Bay Area News Group
    •Scott Detrow, KQED Sacramento Bureau

    Further Reporting:
    A Guide to California's June 2014 Primary Ballot Measures
    President Obama at Wal-Mart to Talk About Solar Power
    Mike Honda, Ro Khanna Face Off Ahead of June Primary

    "Documented" filmmaker Jose Antonio Vargas
    Jose Antonio Vargas was twelve years old when his mother sent him from the Philippines to live in the Bay Area with his grandparents. After graduating from Mountain View High School, his career as a journalist took off, but Vargas was troubled by the secret of his status as an undocumented immigrant. As he watched students and activists around the country push for the passage of the Dream Act in 2010, Vargas decided to get involved himself. His story is told through his new film, "Documented," opening in select Bay Area theaters on May 16. Thuy Vu sits down with Vargas to hear about the film and his story.

    A Photographer On A Mission
    California Air National Guardsman Ed Drew is the first photographer since the American Civil War to make tintype portraits of soldiers in a combat zone. Now he's turning his lens on an inspirational group of at-risk youth who are making a better life for themselves through organic farming.

    Further Reporting:
    Photographer on a Mission Uses 19th-Century Technique to Make Timeless Images
    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 7:30 pm
    QUEST [#705H] Restoring America's Waters Find out how the health of America's waterways is being restored. Follow scientists and fishermen as they team up to rebuild North Carolina's deteriorating oyster reefs. Battle algae blooms with Lake Erie researchers and discover how the largest dam removal project in U.S. history is providing hope for Washington state's salmon. Plus, discover an Ohio artist who turns coal mine run-off into works of art. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1305] Great Australian Hikes Zay embarks on five of Australia's greatest hikes including Mount Bishop and Clerk in Maria Island, the six foot track in the Blue Mountains of New South Wales, the Great Ocean Road in Victoria, Mount Gower on Lord Howe Island and Lamington National Park in Queensland. Along the way he encounters the country's most exotic wildlife such as the spiny echidna and the wombat, experiences the most spectacular views and treks through the country's most historic regions. duration 55:20   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 9:00 pm
    Nature [#2202H] Shark Mountain Underwater filmmakers Howard and Michele Hall have spent 25 years diving and documenting the most remote and beautiful underwater locations, always learning something new about the fantastic creatures that live there. Yet even these remote places and creatures are at risk in today's world, and being able to share their experiences with the rest of us is increasingly important to the Halls, and to us. They take us along on the dive of a lifetime, to a tiny outpost 300 miles off the coast of Central American - Shark Mountain. duration 55:16   SRND51 TVPG-V
  • 10:00 pm
    Nova [#4111H] Why Sharks Attack In recent years, an unusual spate of deadly shark attacks has gripped Australia, resulting in five deaths in 10 months. At the same time, great white sharks have begun appearing in growing numbers off the beaches of Cape Cod, Massachusetts, not far from the waters where Steven Spielberg filmed the ultimate shark fright film, Jaws. What's behind the mysterious arrival of this apex predator in an area where they've rarely been seen for hundreds of years? Are deadly encounters with tourists inevitable? To separate fact from fear, Nova teams up with leading shark experts in Australia and the United States to discover the science behind the great white's hunting instincts. Do sharks ever target humans or is each attack a tragic case of mistaken identity? Can a deeper understanding of shark senses lead scientists to design effective deterrents and help prevent future attacks? With shark populations around the world plummeting, scientists race to unlock the secrets of these powerful creatures of the deep in their quest to save people -- and sharks. duration 55:16   STEREO TVPG
  • 11:00 pm
    Inside Nature's Giants [#103H] Great White Shark The experts travel to South Africa to dissect a 15-foot-long great white shark. Comparative anatomist Joy Reidenberg uncovers the amazing array of senses the shark possesses, including the ability to detect the electro-magnetic field given off by other creatures. Veterinary scientist Mark Evans investigates the origins of the shark's infamous killing bite, and evolutionary biologist Richard Dawkins explains how sharks' teeth and jaws evolved from their outer skin and gill arches. Finally, the experts ask whether the shark deserves its reputation as a man killer. duration 54:47   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 12:00 am
    America Reframed [#216] Rachel Is Filmmaker Charlotte Glynn moves home to chronicle her sister Rachel's last year in school. Rachel is developmentally disabled, and the resulting film, Rachel is, moves past the safety of political correctness and into the most intimate and honest moments in their family's life. Rachel is mysterious, funny, difficult and full of contradictions but she wants what most people her age want -- to move out of her mother's house. This dream of independence seems impossible. Rachel can't be left alone and the social services needed for her to live an "adult life" are unavailable. duration 1:26:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
Saturday, May 10, 2014

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TV Technical Issues

TV
    TV Technical Issues
    • KQET (DT25) Over the Air: Wed 8/27

      We are aware of the break-up issues for our DT25 Over the Air signal in the Monterey/Salinas area. This will also affect viewers of any cable or satellite signal provider using that transmitter as their source. Engineers are working on the problem.

    • Week of 8/25: Sutro Tower work (including KQED 9 Over the Air)

      (Affects several San Francisco TV & Radio stations, including KQED 9.1, 9.2 & 9.3) During the week of August 25, Monday through Friday, between 9am and 4pm, several TV and radio stations will be switching to their Auxiliary antennas. This is being done so that the tower crew can perform routine maintenance on the regular […]

    • KQET Off Air Sun 8/03 morning

      (DT25.1, 25.2, 25.3) KQET DT25 was off the air for a portion of Sunday morning, due to the transmitter taking a power hit. The signal has been restored. Most receivers should have re-acquired our signal once it returned, but a few Over the Air viewers may need to do a rescan in order to restore […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

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