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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Saturday, February 15, 2014

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, February 15, 2014
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10865] * Storm economics * Closing the gap * Update from Sochi * California drought * Shields & Brooks duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#33033] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, Stocks log their biggest weekly gain this year. Is the recent pullback over? And, our market monitor guest tonight is recommending dividend paying stocks that she says will do well in a slow growth environment. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#3139] Tavis talks with actor Chiwetel Ejiofor, nominated this season for numerous awards, including a Golden Globe and an Oscar. The British actor reflects on his work in 12 Years a Slave and seeing the story the film tells from inside the brutal experience. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    America Revealed [#102] Nation on the Move America is a nation of vast distances and dense urban clusters, woven together by 200,000 miles of railroads, 5000 airports and four million miles of roads. These massive, complex transportation systems combine to make Americans the most mobile people on earth, but much of this infrastructure, built in the 19th and 20th centuries, strains under the weight of our rapidly growing, constantly moving population. In this episode, host Yul Kwon journeys across the continent by air, road and rail. He ventures behind the scenes with the workers who get us where we need to go; he meets innovators creating ways to propel us farther and faster in years to come; and he uncovers the minor miracles and uphill battles involved in moving over 300 million Americans every day. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1724] THE ETHICS OF WHISTLE-BLOWING - Edward Snowden remains in Moscow avoiding prosecution in the US for making public a vast amount of classified data revealing the extent of the National Security Agency's surveillance operations, around the world and in the US. Lucky Severson reports on the ongoing debate about the morality of his actions: Was what Snowden did wrong because it hurts national security? Or was he right to make public what he saw as the government's massive invasion of privacy?
    JORDAN, THE OTHER HOLY LAND - Jordan's King Abdullah is in the US this week for a summit with President Obama on the Middle East peace process and the Syrian refugee crisis. Jordan is predominantly Muslim but has long had a vibrant Christian presence. In recent years, the number of Christians there has dropped dramatically, just as it has in many other parts of the Middle East. Kim Lawton reports from Jordan on the situation for Jordanian Christians, who say that like their neighbors Israel and the West Bank, they too should be considered part of the Holy Land.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1034] Investing In Muni Bonds WT focuses on the rising appeal of municipal bonds. Despite some negative headlines, top fund managers Robert Amodeo of Western Asset Management and Robert DiMella of MacKay Municipal Managers say there are opportunities to be had in munis. duration 27:26   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2249H] * Wendy Davis Accused of Flip Flopping on Abortion * New Study Says Women-Owned Businesses Do Better in Some Areas * Jane Pauley on Reinventing Yourself
    Panelists: Former President and CEO of the Women's Campaign Fund Sam Bennett, Heritage Foundation's Jennifer Marshall, Danielle Moodie-Mills of the Center for American Progress, Political Strategist Rina Shah.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    Asian Voices [#218] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    Billy The Kid: American Experience On April 28, 1881, 21-year-old Henry McCarty, alias Billy the Kid, just days from being hanged for murder, outfoxed his jailors and electrified the nation with the latest in a long line of daring escapes. An outlaw with a deadly reputation, the young man was finally gunned down by an ambitious sheriff just a few weeks later. The felling of one of the most notorious criminals of the age was instantly national news. First demonized by the lawman who killed him, he was soon mythologized by a never-ending stream of dime store romances and big-screen dramas. But in all the tellings, Billy the Kid's real story has been obscured. Born to impoverished Irish immigrants, the Kid led a hardscrabble life that became harder still when his mother died of tuberculosis. He came of age in a lawless corner of New Mexico, where an Irish immigrant ring held a vice-like grip on all money-making endeavors and the Mexican population was frequently cheated out of their property without recourse to the courts. Caught in the middle of a many centuries old conflict, the Kid captured national attention with his reckless violence. His fascination with Mexican culture, his flair for Spanish and his disdain for the Anglo authorities made him a hero of sorts to the Hispanic community, who hid him when the law came looking and mourned him most when he was gone. duration 55:40   STEREO TVPG-V (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    Butch Cassidy & The Sundance Kid: American Experience Long before Paul Newman and Robert Redford immortalized them on screen, Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid captivated Americans from coast to coast. In the 1890s, their exploits robbing banks and trains in the West - and then seemingly vanishing into thin air - became national news and the basis of rumors and myth. But who were Robert Leroy Parker and Harry Alonzo Longabaugh? How did they come together to form the Wild Bunch gang? And how did they manage to pull off the longest string of successful holdups in history while eluding the Pinkertons, the nation's most feared detective force? Separating fact from fiction, this program explores the last pair of outlaws to flee on horseback into a setting sun. duration 56:16   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 7:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1724] THE ETHICS OF WHISTLE-BLOWING - Edward Snowden remains in Moscow avoiding prosecution in the US for making public a vast amount of classified data revealing the extent of the National Security Agency's surveillance operations, around the world and in the US. Lucky Severson reports on the ongoing debate about the morality of his actions: Was what Snowden did wrong because it hurts national security? Or was he right to make public what he saw as the government's massive invasion of privacy?
    JORDAN, THE OTHER HOLY LAND - Jordan's King Abdullah is in the US this week for a summit with President Obama on the Middle East peace process and the Syrian refugee crisis. Jordan is predominantly Muslim but has long had a vibrant Christian presence. In recent years, the number of Christians there has dropped dramatically, just as it has in many other parts of the Middle East. Kim Lawton reports from Jordan on the situation for Jordanian Christians, who say that like their neighbors Israel and the West Bank, they too should be considered part of the Holy Land.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#306H] Putting Political Corruption On Ice This week, two Americans fighting the good fight against greed and corruption.
    * First, David Simon, former crime reporter and creator of the TV series The Wire and Treme, talks with Bill Moyers about the triumph of capital over democracy. "if it's just about generating mass wealth, then you know, what are we saying?" he asks Moyers. "What are we saying about the human condition? What are saying about our society's condition?
    Simon believes that to find a solution, "You have to do it legislatively. [But] how do you do that when your legislative aspect has been completely purchased by the very capital that's being amassed?" One possibility? "If I could concentrate and focus on one thing and hope that by breaking the cycle you might start to walk the nightmare back, it would be campaign finance reform."
    * Enter constitutional scholar and activist Lawrence Lessig, who last month led a 2-week trek through the winter cold from north to south down 185 miles of streets and roads in New Hampshire - traditionally, the site of the nation's first presidential primary. The march was to raise awareness of the need for campaign finance reform. Lessig's movement, NH Rebellion, is encouraging voters to ask all the presidential candidates who soon will be haunting New Hampshire: How are you going to end the system of corruption in Washington?
    "We've been looking for a long time for the kind of action that people had to pay attention to, they had to look at, they had to see, they had to think about," Lessig said. "We're hopeful that if people see people trudging through the sleet and the rain and the snow in New Hampshire in January, they'll stop and say, 'Why? Why would you do that? What's the purpose? What's the issue?' And as they think about it they'll be reminded that they, too, care about this issue."
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 8:00 am
    LinkAsia [#234] duration 26:46   STEREO
  • 8:30 am
    Great Decisions In Foreign Policy [#501] Defense on a Budget Can America sustain its primacy in the international system with ever increasing security challenges while defense spending is limited by fiscal austerity? duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:00 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5333H] While snow storms and weather delays seemed to be the big story along the Atlantic coast this week, there was plenty of news being made in the nation's capital.
    * On Capitol Hill, Congress passed a "clean" debt ceiling bill and approved a measure to restore pension benefits to military retirees. Republicans hoping to avoid more bad press like during the 2013 government shutdown and with an eye on the 2014 midterm election, retreated from their original strategy to link any hike in the debt-limit to measures designed to curb the Affordable Care Act or approve the Keystone XL pipeline. The House passed the extension with mostly Democratic votes and GOP lawmakers in the Senate were forced to overcome a filibuster threat and political maneuvers by tea party favorite Sen. Ted Cruz (TX).
    * The Obama administration announced another delay in the implementation of a portion of the Affordable Care Act giving some small businesses an extra year to comply with the mandate that requires employers provide health insurance for employees. And just-released health care enrollment numbers indicate the new law seems to have overcome the initial rocky rollout and is gaining traction with Americans.
    Joining Gwen Ifill for a special reporters roundtable on the politics of the debt ceiling debate, GOP positioning ahead of the 2014 midterm elections, and the White House's continuing problems with the Affordable Care Act: Molly Ball of The Atlantic, Alexis Simendinger of RealClearPolitics, and Karen Tumulty of The Washington Post.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:30 am
    KQED NEWSROOM [#116H] A Dry Run For Coho Salmon, Concerns Over Pedestrian Safety and the Tenth Anniversary of Same-Sex Marriage
    Drought Update
    President Obama visits California's Central Valley where he is expected to pledge $183 million in federal aid to help California farmers who lost livestock due to drought conditions. KQED Newsroom senior correspondent Scott Shafer provides analysis.

    Further Reporting: Why Recent Rains Didn't Make a Bigger Dent in the Drought

    A Dry Run for Coho Salmon
    California's worst drought on record is taking a toll not only on fields and farms but also on iconic native species, including the endangered Central California Coast coho salmon. Low water levels have prevented many adult coho from reaching their spawning grounds in Lagunitas Creek in Marin County. Last week's rains brought a measure of relief, raising water levels enough to allow some salmon through. But as KQED reporter Dan Brekke found in talking with a fish biologist at the Marin Municipal Water District, the relief may be temporary.

    Further Reporting: Marin's Salmon, the Drought, and Us

    Concerns Over Pedestrian Safety After a Spike in Fatalities
    A spike in fatal pedestrian traffic accidents around the Bay Area has renewed attention on both street design and driver behavior. A fatal crash this week on San Francisco's Van Ness Street brings this year's tally up to three for the city. And last year was a particular deadly year for San Jose, where 26 pedestrian fatalities were logged — the highest in nearly two decades. What's behind the spike and what can be done to calm traffic?

    Guests:
    Chris Hwang, Walk Oakland Bike Oakland board president
    Nicole Schneider, Walk San Francisco executive director

    Further Reporting: Arrest Made in San Francisco's Latest Pedestrian Fatality

    Tenth Anniversary of Same Sex Marriage — An Interview with Kate Kendell
    It's been ten years since then-Mayor Gavin Newsom allowed marriage licenses for gay couples at City Hall in San Francisco. Same sex marriage has been on a long and winding journey since then — from a voter proposition to ban gay marriage to a U.S. Supreme Court decision that struck down part of the Defense of Marriage Act. Now seventeen states and the District of Columbia allow same sex marriage, and public opinion is rapidly changing. Scott Shafer hears from the National Center for Lesbian Rights Executive Director Kate Kendell about her work on this civil rights issue and where it's heading next.
    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 10:00 am
    BBC Newsnight [#17045Z] duration 28:18   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2249H] * Wendy Davis Accused of Flip Flopping on Abortion * New Study Says Women-Owned Businesses Do Better in Some Areas * Jane Pauley on Reinventing Yourself
    Panelists: Former President and CEO of the Women's Campaign Fund Sam Bennett, Heritage Foundation's Jennifer Marshall, Danielle Moodie-Mills of the Center for American Progress, Political Strategist Rina Shah.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3208H] TOPICS: BONJOUR, PRESIDENT HOLLANDE!; RAND PAUL'S WRIT. PANELISTS: Pat Buchanan, Author and Columnist; Eleanor Clift, The Daily Beast; Mort Zuckerman, US New & World Report; Guy Taylor, The Washington Times. duration 27:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Charlie Rose - The Week [#131] * Jack Lew, Secretary of the Treasury * Mike Allen on the week in politics * Photgrapher Bruce Weber * Beau Willimon on season 2 of House of Cards * Actor Bill Murray * a look at the film Winter's Tale with actor Colin Farrell duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#306H] Putting Political Corruption On Ice This week, two Americans fighting the good fight against greed and corruption.
    * First, David Simon, former crime reporter and creator of the TV series The Wire and Treme, talks with Bill Moyers about the triumph of capital over democracy. "if it's just about generating mass wealth, then you know, what are we saying?" he asks Moyers. "What are we saying about the human condition? What are saying about our society's condition?
    Simon believes that to find a solution, "You have to do it legislatively. [But] how do you do that when your legislative aspect has been completely purchased by the very capital that's being amassed?" One possibility? "If I could concentrate and focus on one thing and hope that by breaking the cycle you might start to walk the nightmare back, it would be campaign finance reform."
    * Enter constitutional scholar and activist Lawrence Lessig, who last month led a 2-week trek through the winter cold from north to south down 185 miles of streets and roads in New Hampshire - traditionally, the site of the nation's first presidential primary. The march was to raise awareness of the need for campaign finance reform. Lessig's movement, NH Rebellion, is encouraging voters to ask all the presidential candidates who soon will be haunting New Hampshire: How are you going to end the system of corruption in Washington?
    "We've been looking for a long time for the kind of action that people had to pay attention to, they had to look at, they had to see, they had to think about," Lessig said. "We're hopeful that if people see people trudging through the sleet and the rain and the snow in New Hampshire in January, they'll stop and say, 'Why? Why would you do that? What's the purpose? What's the issue?' And as they think about it they'll be reminded that they, too, care about this issue."
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 12:30 pm
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1724] THE ETHICS OF WHISTLE-BLOWING - Edward Snowden remains in Moscow avoiding prosecution in the US for making public a vast amount of classified data revealing the extent of the National Security Agency's surveillance operations, around the world and in the US. Lucky Severson reports on the ongoing debate about the morality of his actions: Was what Snowden did wrong because it hurts national security? Or was he right to make public what he saw as the government's massive invasion of privacy?
    JORDAN, THE OTHER HOLY LAND - Jordan's King Abdullah is in the US this week for a summit with President Obama on the Middle East peace process and the Syrian refugee crisis. Jordan is predominantly Muslim but has long had a vibrant Christian presence. In recent years, the number of Christians there has dropped dramatically, just as it has in many other parts of the Middle East. Kim Lawton reports from Jordan on the situation for Jordanian Christians, who say that like their neighbors Israel and the West Bank, they too should be considered part of the Holy Land.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 pm
    QUEST [#320] California's Galapagos/Maya Skies Visit the Farallon Islands, a uniquely valuable part of the Bay Area's precious natural heritage long important to marine wildlife. And engineers re-create detailed virtual records of the world's monuments, starting with the Mexican ruins of Chichen Itza. duration 26:20   STEREO TVG
  • 1:30 pm
    BioCentury This Week [#307] duration 25:41   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    Unforgivable Blackness: The Rise and Fall of Jack Johnson [#101H] Part 1 Part one follows Jack Johnson's remarkable journey from his humble beginnings in Galveston, Texas, as the son of former slaves, to his entry into the brutal world of professional boxing, where, in turn-of-the-century Jim Crow America, the heavyweight champion was an exclusively "white" title. Johnson lived his life out loud, wearing fancy clothes, driving fast cars and openly flaunting the conventions of the time by dating and then marrying white women. Despite the odds, Johnson was able to batter his way up through the professional ranks, and in 1908 he became the first African American to earn the title Heavyweight Champion of the World. Johnson's victory set in motion a worldwide search for a "white hope" to restore the title to whites. On July 4, 1910, in Reno, Nevada, ex-champion Jim Jeffries, the new "Great White Hope," came out of retirement to challenge Johnson. Johnson easily won the contest, billed as the Battle of the Century, despite a hostile crowd and a steady stream of racial epithets hurled from Jeffries' corner. Johnson's victory provoked race riots all around the country, but his troubles were only just beginning. duration 1:52:03   SRND51 TVPG-L
  • 4:00 pm
    Unforgivable Blackness: The Rise and Fall of Jack Johnson [#102H] Part 2 By the end of 1910, Jack Johnson was on top of the world, the undisputed Heavyweight Champion of the World, the most famous - and notorious - African American on earth. But forces were gathering in America to stop him. When no one could be found to beat the champion in the ring, the U.S. government set out to destroy him in the courts, using his sometimes-troubled relationships with white women as the excuse to prosecute him. Unfairly charged with violating the Mann Act, a progressive-era piece of legislation designed to stop commercialized vice - not relationships between consenting adults - Jack Johnson was convicted and sentenced to jail. Skipping bail, Johnson fled to Europe, where he remained a fugitive for many years. In 1915 in Havana, Cuba, he defended his title in a still-controversial fight against Jess Willard, a fight that went on for 26 rounds in 105-degree heat. Determined to live his life regardless of the confines imposed by his color, Jack Johnson emerged as a central figure in America's ongoing struggle to deal with the question of race. duration 1:59:15   SRND51 TVPG-L
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour Weekend [#147H] Included: The tech bug has hit Africa, spurring rapid innovation in mobile phone technology and creating greater access to the internet. Martin Seemungal reports from Kenya, the East African nation leading the trend. That, and the weekend's news, online and on-air. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5333H] While snow storms and weather delays seemed to be the big story along the Atlantic coast this week, there was plenty of news being made in the nation's capital.
    * On Capitol Hill, Congress passed a "clean" debt ceiling bill and approved a measure to restore pension benefits to military retirees. Republicans hoping to avoid more bad press like during the 2013 government shutdown and with an eye on the 2014 midterm election, retreated from their original strategy to link any hike in the debt-limit to measures designed to curb the Affordable Care Act or approve the Keystone XL pipeline. The House passed the extension with mostly Democratic votes and GOP lawmakers in the Senate were forced to overcome a filibuster threat and political maneuvers by tea party favorite Sen. Ted Cruz (TX).
    * The Obama administration announced another delay in the implementation of a portion of the Affordable Care Act giving some small businesses an extra year to comply with the mandate that requires employers provide health insurance for employees. And just-released health care enrollment numbers indicate the new law seems to have overcome the initial rocky rollout and is gaining traction with Americans.
    Joining Gwen Ifill for a special reporters roundtable on the politics of the debt ceiling debate, GOP positioning ahead of the 2014 midterm elections, and the White House's continuing problems with the Affordable Care Act: Molly Ball of The Atlantic, Alexis Simendinger of RealClearPolitics, and Karen Tumulty of The Washington Post.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 pm
    KQED NEWSROOM [#116H] A Dry Run For Coho Salmon, Concerns Over Pedestrian Safety and the Tenth Anniversary of Same-Sex Marriage
    Drought Update
    President Obama visits California's Central Valley where he is expected to pledge $183 million in federal aid to help California farmers who lost livestock due to drought conditions. KQED Newsroom senior correspondent Scott Shafer provides analysis.

    Further Reporting: Why Recent Rains Didn't Make a Bigger Dent in the Drought

    A Dry Run for Coho Salmon
    California's worst drought on record is taking a toll not only on fields and farms but also on iconic native species, including the endangered Central California Coast coho salmon. Low water levels have prevented many adult coho from reaching their spawning grounds in Lagunitas Creek in Marin County. Last week's rains brought a measure of relief, raising water levels enough to allow some salmon through. But as KQED reporter Dan Brekke found in talking with a fish biologist at the Marin Municipal Water District, the relief may be temporary.

    Further Reporting: Marin's Salmon, the Drought, and Us

    Concerns Over Pedestrian Safety After a Spike in Fatalities
    A spike in fatal pedestrian traffic accidents around the Bay Area has renewed attention on both street design and driver behavior. A fatal crash this week on San Francisco's Van Ness Street brings this year's tally up to three for the city. And last year was a particular deadly year for San Jose, where 26 pedestrian fatalities were logged — the highest in nearly two decades. What's behind the spike and what can be done to calm traffic?

    Guests:
    Chris Hwang, Walk Oakland Bike Oakland board president
    Nicole Schneider, Walk San Francisco executive director

    Further Reporting: Arrest Made in San Francisco's Latest Pedestrian Fatality

    Tenth Anniversary of Same Sex Marriage — An Interview with Kate Kendell
    It's been ten years since then-Mayor Gavin Newsom allowed marriage licenses for gay couples at City Hall in San Francisco. Same sex marriage has been on a long and winding journey since then — from a voter proposition to ban gay marriage to a U.S. Supreme Court decision that struck down part of the Defense of Marriage Act. Now seventeen states and the District of Columbia allow same sex marriage, and public opinion is rapidly changing. Scott Shafer hears from the National Center for Lesbian Rights Executive Director Kate Kendell about her work on this civil rights issue and where it's heading next.
    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 7:30 pm
    QUEST [#320] California's Galapagos/Maya Skies Visit the Farallon Islands, a uniquely valuable part of the Bay Area's precious natural heritage long important to marine wildlife. And engineers re-create detailed virtual records of the world's monuments, starting with the Mexican ruins of Chichen Itza. duration 26:20   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1216] Scotland Megan journeys to Glasgow, where she visits the Macintosh Museum and takes a bagpipe lesson. Next she travels to Stirling, site of a major victory by William "Braveheart" Wallace, Scotland's national hero. Megan samples the whiskey on the island of Islay, explores the mountainous region of Oben, goes fishing off the Isle of Skye, tours the battlefield of Culloden and pursues the myth of the Loch Ness Monster. She then travels to Strathdon for the Clanloddoch Highland games, witnesses an Orkadian wedding in Skara Brae, hits the links at St. Andrews and revels in the performances at the Edinburgh Festival. duration 56:43   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 9:00 pm
    Nature [#2902H] The Animal House Animals build homes for reasons very similar to our own, but they've been doing it for much longer. From a small depression in the sand to an elaborate, multi-chambered tunnel - animal structures can be simple or architectural marvels. In each case, the goal is the same - protection from predators and a nearby source of food. These structures, whether a nest, a burrow or a mound, are also the site of great dramas and extraordinary behaviors. From master builders like termites and beavers, to master decorators like the bowerbird, which places colorful flowers at the entrance to its nest, "The Animal House" will be a global look at the "homelife of wildlife." duration 56:16   SRND51 TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 10:00 pm
    Nova [#4105H] Great Cathedral Mystery The Duomo in Florence is a towering masterpiece of Renaissance ingenuity and an enduring source of mystery. A team of US master bricklayers help build a unique experimental "mini-Duomo" using period tools and techniques. Will it stay intact during the final precarious stages of closing over the top of the dome? duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 11:00 pm
    Super Skyscrapers [#102H] Building The Future Commonly known as "the cheese grater," the Leadenhall Building is the pinnacle of London's avant-garde architecture. Designed as a tapered tower with a steel exoskeleton, it's the tallest skyscraper in the City of London and the most innovative. The teams behind the Leadenhall project had to radically rethink every aspect of the traditional building model. This program follows the monumental challenges that come with erecting this super skyscraper: it will be constructed off-site, delivered to location, and stacked and bolted together like a giant Lego set. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 12:00 am
    America Reframed [#212] The Prep School Negro Andre Robert Lee and his sister grew up in the ghettos of Philadelphia. Their mother struggled to support them by putting strings in the waistbands of track pants and swimsuits in a local factory. When Andre was 14 years old, he received what his family believed to be a golden ticket, a full scholarship to attend one of the most prestigious prep schools in the country. Elite education was Andre's way up and out, but at what price? Yes, the exorbitant tuition was covered, but this new world cost him and his family much more than anyone could have anticipated.
    In this program, Andre takes a journey back in time to revisit the events of his adolescence while also spending time with current day prep school students of color and their classmates to see how much has really changed inside the ivory tower. What he discovers along the way is the poignant and unapologetic truth about who really pays the consequences for yesterday's accelerated desegregation and today's racial naivete.
    duration 1:25:52   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
Saturday, February 15, 2014

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TV Technical Issues

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    TV Technical Issues
    • KQET (DT25) Over the Air: Wed 8/27

      We are aware of the break-up issues for our DT25 Over the Air signal in the Monterey/Salinas area. This will also affect viewers of any cable or satellite signal provider using that transmitter as their source. Engineers are working on the problem.

    • Week of 8/25: Sutro Tower work (including KQED 9 Over the Air)

      (Affects several San Francisco TV & Radio stations, including KQED 9.1, 9.2 & 9.3) During the week of August 25, Monday through Friday, between 9am and 4pm, several TV and radio stations will be switching to their Auxiliary antennas. This is being done so that the tower crew can perform routine maintenance on the regular […]

    • KQET Off Air Sun 8/03 morning

      (DT25.1, 25.2, 25.3) KQET DT25 was off the air for a portion of Sunday morning, due to the transmitter taking a power hit. The signal has been restored. Most receivers should have re-acquired our signal once it returned, but a few Over the Air viewers may need to do a rescan in order to restore […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

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