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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Sunday, November 24, 2013

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Sunday, November 24, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    America Reframed [#203] The Medicine Game This program shares the remarkable journey of two brothers from the Onondaga Nation driven by a single goal; to beat the odds and play lacrosse for national powerhouse Syracuse University. The obstacles in their way are frequent and daunting. In their darkest hour, and with their dreams crumbling around them, the boys must look to their family and to their Native teachings for guidance and stability. It is their search for identity that transitions this film from a playful coming of age story, into an important study of modern Native American life. It follows their story over the next six years as they struggle to rebuild their friendship, rescue a fading childhood dream, and gain a more resolute understanding of their identity and culture, both as athletes and the next generation of the Onondaga people. duration 1:26:39   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Injunuity Injunuity is a collage of reflections on the Native American world, our shared past, our turbulent present, and our undiscovered future. From Columbus to the western expansion to tribal casinos, we are taught that the Native way, while at times glorious, is something of the past, something that needed to be replaced by a manifest destiny from across the ocean. But in a world increasingly short of real answers, it is time we looked to Native wisdom for guidance. It is time for some Injunuity.
    Injunuity is a mix of animation, music, and real thoughts from real people exploring our world from the Native American perspective. Every word spoken is verbatim, every thought and opinion is real, told in nine short pieces and covering such topics as language preservation, sacred sites, and the environment. But rather than simply revisit our history, the goal of Injunuity is to help define our future, to try and figure out the path that lies before us, to focus on where we are going as well as where we have been.
    duration 29:06   STEREO TV14 (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Teaching Channel Presents [#208] Middle School Middle School: See how middle school students in America are being prepared for high school. Follow along as students read a fairy tale to learn the concepts of plot and theme. Find out why passing notes is encouraged in a sixth grade class. Learn how some teachers are motivating young learners by tapping into their interests. duration 57:04   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Moyers & Company [#246H] Zombie Politics and Casino Capitalism In his book Zombie Politics and Culture in the Age of Casino Capitalism, author and scholar Henry Giroux connects the dots, threading together ideas and experiences to prove his theory that our current system is informed by a "machinery of social and civil death" that chills "any vestige of a robust democracy." This week on Moyers &Company (check local listings), Giroux explains that such a machine turns people into zombies - "people who are basically so caught up with surviving that they become like the walking dead - they lose their sense of agency, they lose their homes, they lose their jobs." What's more, Giroux points out, the system that creates this vacuum has little to do with expanding the meaning and the substance of democracy itself. Under "casino capitalism," the goal is to get a quick return, taking advantage of a kind of logic in which the only thing that drives us is to put as much money as we can into a slot machine and hope we walk out with our wallets overflowing. A cultural and social critic of tireless energy and vast interests, Giroux holds the Global TV Network Chair in the English and Cultural Studies Department at McMaster University and is a distinguished visiting professor at Reyerson University, both schools in Canada. Described by Moyers as "torch bearer in the art and science of teaching," he has been an important contributor in a variety of academic fields, including cultural, youth and media studies. Also on the broadcast, Bill Moyers remembers a 2003 interview with Nobel-prize winning novelist Doris Lessing who passed away this week in London at the age of 94. And a look at "Birth of the Living Dead", a mesmerizing new documentary that examines the singular time in which the classic film "Night of the Living Dead" was shot - when civil unrest and violence gave the nation nightmares, and zombies were a metaphor for an American public troubled and distressed. duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5321H] * The Senate went nuclear on Thursday. After threatening for months, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV) orchestrated a new rule allowing for the confirmation of judicial nominees with a simple 51-vote majority. President Obama applauded the change calling out Republicans for stalling the confirmation of his nominees in what he called a "pattern of obstruction [that] just isn't normal." Republicans fumed that the rule change was a power grab designed to deflect the focus away from the rocky implementation of the president's Affordable Care Act. Susan Davis of USA Today will explain why Democrats decided to exercise the so-called "nuclear option" and how it is sure to strain already tenuous relations along both sides of the aisle in Congress.
    * Secretary of State John Kerry announced a tentative security deal with the Afghan government that will keep an undetermined number of US troops in Afghanistan through 2024. Afghan President Hamid Karzai announced that he supports the plan but will not sign the agreement until after next year's presidential elections. James Kitfield of National Journal will explain how Karzai's decision is playing into the delicate negotiations in Kabul to determine the size and scope of the long-term US mission in Afghanistan as America's longest war moves into its 13th year.
    * Martha Raddatz of ABC News will report on this week's debate on the Senate floor that pitted one Democrat against another and many lawmakers against Pentagon commanders over how the military should handle sexual assaults and rapes within the ranks.
    * During his 3 years in office President John F. Kennedy navigated a crisis that could have triggered a nuclear war with the former Soviet Union and laid the groundwork for the enactment of the Civil Rights Act. Michael Duffy of Time Magazine will look back on JFK's accomplishments during his 1000 days in office and the legacy that lives on 50 years after his assassination.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3148H] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 5:00 am
    Charlie Rose - The Week [#119] Mike Allen on the week in politics * Nancy Gibbs on health care * Presidential biographer Robert Caro and Secret service Agent Clint Hill on the assassination of President John F. Kennedy * Doris Kearns Goodwin discusses her book The Bully Pulpit * 3-time Formula 1 World Champion Niki Lauda duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2532H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    America Reframed [#203] The Medicine Game This program shares the remarkable journey of two brothers from the Onondaga Nation driven by a single goal; to beat the odds and play lacrosse for national powerhouse Syracuse University. The obstacles in their way are frequent and daunting. In their darkest hour, and with their dreams crumbling around them, the boys must look to their family and to their Native teachings for guidance and stability. It is their search for identity that transitions this film from a playful coming of age story, into an important study of modern Native American life. It follows their story over the next six years as they struggle to rebuild their friendship, rescue a fading childhood dream, and gain a more resolute understanding of their identity and culture, both as athletes and the next generation of the Onondaga people. duration 1:26:39   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:30 am
    Silicon Valley Goes to Space Discover how the big, bold ideas of Silicon Valley are helping launch a new era of private space exploration in this KQED Science television special. From space tourism to mining the moon to companies building rocket ships to ferry NASA astronauts into space, a new wave of commercialization is shaking up the $300 billion global space industry. But are there new risks when space is no longer the exclusive domain of big governments? duration 26:23   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1712] Making It Against the Law to Help the Homeless - More and more cities trying to clean up their downtowns are finding new ways to discourage the homeless from gathering there. Lucky Severson reports on controversial new ordinances in cities around the country that make it illegal for caregivers to feed and otherwise minister to those living on downtown streets. Thanksgivukkah - In a rare calendar convergence, the first full day of Hanukkah, the eight-day-Jewish festival of lights, falls on Thanksgiving Day this year. According to some calculations, that will not happen again for nearly 80,000 years. The American Jewish community has dubbed the convergence, "Thanksgivukkah." Kim Lawton looks at some of the ways people are celebrating, including holiday mash-up recipes and merchandise, such as turkey-shaped menorahs. She also talks to Jewish leaders who say underneath the fun, Thanksgivukkah highlights important values such as religious freedom, gratitude and charity. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1022] Income Shift WT explores ways to find income in a low yield world without taking on too much risk. One of Morningstar's favorite fund managers, Westwood Income Opportunity Fund's Mark Freeman, explains why he is moving out of bonds and into stocks. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 am
    Truth About Money with Ric Edelman [#312H] Financial advisor Ric Edelman says we're moving toward a greener economy, but will that transition be an easy one? Also U.S. healthcare is in the middle of a major transformation, and we're not talking about the Affordable Healthcare Act. Plus Ric says just because you CAN retire at 45 doesn't necessarily mean you SHOULD. All that and so much more on this edition of The Truth about Money with Ric Edelman. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2532H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 10:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3148H] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5321H] * The Senate went nuclear on Thursday. After threatening for months, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV) orchestrated a new rule allowing for the confirmation of judicial nominees with a simple 51-vote majority. President Obama applauded the change calling out Republicans for stalling the confirmation of his nominees in what he called a "pattern of obstruction [that] just isn't normal." Republicans fumed that the rule change was a power grab designed to deflect the focus away from the rocky implementation of the president's Affordable Care Act. Susan Davis of USA Today will explain why Democrats decided to exercise the so-called "nuclear option" and how it is sure to strain already tenuous relations along both sides of the aisle in Congress.
    * Secretary of State John Kerry announced a tentative security deal with the Afghan government that will keep an undetermined number of US troops in Afghanistan through 2024. Afghan President Hamid Karzai announced that he supports the plan but will not sign the agreement until after next year's presidential elections. James Kitfield of National Journal will explain how Karzai's decision is playing into the delicate negotiations in Kabul to determine the size and scope of the long-term US mission in Afghanistan as America's longest war moves into its 13th year.
    * Martha Raddatz of ABC News will report on this week's debate on the Senate floor that pitted one Democrat against another and many lawmakers against Pentagon commanders over how the military should handle sexual assaults and rapes within the ranks.
    * During his 3 years in office President John F. Kennedy navigated a crisis that could have triggered a nuclear war with the former Soviet Union and laid the groundwork for the enactment of the Civil Rights Act. Michael Duffy of Time Magazine will look back on JFK's accomplishments during his 1000 days in office and the legacy that lives on 50 years after his assassination.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    KQED NEWSROOM [#106H] California Health Exchange Director Maps Out Future Plans and Policing Caught on Camera
    California Health Exchange Director Maps Out Future Plans
    Scott Shafer hears from Covered California's Executive Director Peter Lee about how the state's health exchange is faring. On Thursday, its board voted not to extend canceled insurance policies that don't comply with the new federal law. Covered California also released some of the first numbers showing which people are signing up and from what regions in the state.

    Further Reporting: Californians With Canceled Policies Cannot Renew, Says Covered California Board

    Policing Caught on Camera
    Recent violent clashes between police and suspects captured on camera by onlookers are raising questions about the role of video on policing. Some departments are outfitting police with their own cameras for documentation. An incident in San Francisco involving the arrest of a bicyclist on the sidewalk outside the Valencia Gardens Apartments sparked community outrage.

    Guests:
    LaDoris Cordell, Independent Police Auditor, City of San Jose
    C.W. Nevius, San Francisco Chronicle columnist

    Further Reporting: Policing in the Age of YouTube: S.F. Police to Join Ranks of Camera-Toting Cops

    Delicious Drama
    An organic farmer struggles to wring a harvest from the sullen earth and contemplates suicide when he fails. A young woman learns to bake coconut cake the way her grandmother did. What we eat, where it comes from, and what it says about us are themes that the Berkeley Repertory Theatre is tackling in an ambitious series of performances commissioned from writers around the country. This report takes us behind the scenes with San Francisco-based playwrights Octavio Solis and Lauren Gunderson as they research and write their short dramas. Watch the segment here (YouTube).
    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 11:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#246H] Zombie Politics and Casino Capitalism In his book Zombie Politics and Culture in the Age of Casino Capitalism, author and scholar Henry Giroux connects the dots, threading together ideas and experiences to prove his theory that our current system is informed by a "machinery of social and civil death" that chills "any vestige of a robust democracy." This week on Moyers &Company (check local listings), Giroux explains that such a machine turns people into zombies - "people who are basically so caught up with surviving that they become like the walking dead - they lose their sense of agency, they lose their homes, they lose their jobs." What's more, Giroux points out, the system that creates this vacuum has little to do with expanding the meaning and the substance of democracy itself. Under "casino capitalism," the goal is to get a quick return, taking advantage of a kind of logic in which the only thing that drives us is to put as much money as we can into a slot machine and hope we walk out with our wallets overflowing. A cultural and social critic of tireless energy and vast interests, Giroux holds the Global TV Network Chair in the English and Cultural Studies Department at McMaster University and is a distinguished visiting professor at Reyerson University, both schools in Canada. Described by Moyers as "torch bearer in the art and science of teaching," he has been an important contributor in a variety of academic fields, including cultural, youth and media studies. Also on the broadcast, Bill Moyers remembers a 2003 interview with Nobel-prize winning novelist Doris Lessing who passed away this week in London at the age of 94. And a look at "Birth of the Living Dead", a mesmerizing new documentary that examines the singular time in which the classic film "Night of the Living Dead" was shot - when civil unrest and violence gave the nation nightmares, and zombies were a metaphor for an American public troubled and distressed. duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:30 pm
    Silicon Valley Goes to Space Discover how the big, bold ideas of Silicon Valley are helping launch a new era of private space exploration in this KQED Science television special. From space tourism to mining the moon to companies building rocket ships to ferry NASA astronauts into space, a new wave of commercialization is shaking up the $300 billion global space industry. But are there new risks when space is no longer the exclusive domain of big governments? duration 26:23   STEREO TVG
  • 1:00 pm
    Real McCoy The Prohibition era (1920-1933) gave rise to a new generation of romantic "characters" - the flapper, the private eye, the organized crime boss and the bootlegger. One such bootlegger, pioneering rum runner Bill McCoy, earned the name "The Real McCoy" because he always delivered uncut, undiluted gin, rum and whiskey to his happy patrons. A teetotaler himself, this "gentleman crook" nevertheless fuelled the Roaring Twenties by smuggling more than one million bottles of illegal alcohol from the Caribbean to New York. McCoy's maritime daring and willful defiance of the unpopular 18th Amendment and government authority made him a household name during the era and earned him a Robin Hood-like mystique with the American public. Based on the book by Frederick Van de Water, THE REAL MCCOY recounts the extraordinary life and legendary exploits of this man who personified the tumultuous times in which he lived. The film charts McCoy's transformation from modest boat builder to public enemy number one through archival materials, historic re-enactments and interviews with noted scholars. duration 56:11   STEREO TVPG
  • 2:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1204] Around The World - Pacific Journeys: Santiago to Pitcairn Zay Harding begins his Pacific journey in Santiago de Chile, gateway to the culturally unique Easter Island. From here he heads to Tahiti, the Polynesian paradise that enticed Louis-Antoine de Bougainville, Captain Cook and Captain Bligh and his Bounty mutineers to stay longer than planned. Zay embarks on an ocean voyage along the waters charted by these famous explorers, including a perilous crossing to Pitcairn Island, which the descendents of the Bounty mutineers call home today. duration 55:29   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 3:00 pm
    Nova [#4023H] At The Edge of Space Between the blue sky above us and the infinite blackness of space lies a frontier that scientists have only just begun to investigate. In "At the Edge of Space," Nova takes viewers on aN exploration of the earth-space boundary zone that's home to some of nature's most puzzling and alluring phenomena: the shimmering aurora, streaking meteors, and fleeting flashes that shoot upwards from thunderclouds, known as sprites. Only discovered in 1989, sprites have eluded capture because they flicker into existence for a mere split-second -- 40 times faster than an eye blink. In a high-flying weather observation plane, we ride with scientists as they hunt for sprites and finally succeed in snaring them in 3D video, gaining vital clues to unraveling their mystery. Combining advanced video technology with sequences shot from the International Space Station, this film probes the enigmas of the boundary zone and brings viewers an intriguing new viewpoint on their planet. duration 55:16   STEREO TVPG
  • 4:00 pm
    Nova [#4024H] Asteroid: Doomsday Or Payday? The asteroid that exploded in the skies over Siberia injuring more than 1,000 and damaging buildings in six cities was a shocking reminder that Earth is a target in a cosmic shooting range. From the width of a football field to the size of a small city, the space rocks called asteroids have the potential to be killers: in a collision with Earth, they could set off deadly blast waves, raging fires and colossal tidal waves. But some audacious entrepreneurs look up at asteroids and see payday, not doomsday. That's because some asteroids are loaded with billions of dollars-worth of elements like iron, nickel and even platinum. While NASA plans an ambitious mission to return samples from a potentially hazardous asteroid, would-be asteroid miners are dreaming up their own program to scout for potentially profitable asteroids. Will asteroids turn out to be our economic salvation -- or instruments of extinction? duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 5:00 pm
    Comet Encounter Comets have fascinated, even terrified us for thousands of years. Traditionally seen as harbingers of doom, they can influence some people even to this day. For scientists though, comets are a great opportunity. This year a particularly massive chunk of ice and rock is hurtling our way, an object that will fascinate billions and should create the space show of the century. Right now Comet ISON, somewhere between one and 10 kilometers in diameter, is just beyond the orbit of Jupiter. As it races past us toward the sun it should develop a tail that will light up the skies brighter than a full moon. Then the comet will slingshot around the back of the sun and could emerge brighter than ever, treating the entire northern hemisphere to an unforgettable sight. It could even be visible in daylight. Simultaneously astronomers will be able to glean vital clues on the origins of our solar system. In this program, scientists all over the world follow a once-in-a-lifetime event and shoot breath-taking images of the sun-grazer comet, spewing its essence into the void. But there is jeopardy too; the comet could evaporate completely or the sun's massive gravity could tear it apart. If the latter happens it will produce a so-called "string of pearls," several much smaller comets arching right across the night sky. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour Weekend [#124H] Included: NewsHour Weekend profiles an innovative probation program in Hawaii that has been so successful in reforming offenders and keeping them out of prison, it's now being copied in courtrooms across the nation. That, and the weekend's news, online and on-air. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    KQED NEWSROOM [#106H] California Health Exchange Director Maps Out Future Plans and Policing Caught on Camera
    California Health Exchange Director Maps Out Future Plans
    Scott Shafer hears from Covered California's Executive Director Peter Lee about how the state's health exchange is faring. On Thursday, its board voted not to extend canceled insurance policies that don't comply with the new federal law. Covered California also released some of the first numbers showing which people are signing up and from what regions in the state.

    Further Reporting: Californians With Canceled Policies Cannot Renew, Says Covered California Board

    Policing Caught on Camera
    Recent violent clashes between police and suspects captured on camera by onlookers are raising questions about the role of video on policing. Some departments are outfitting police with their own cameras for documentation. An incident in San Francisco involving the arrest of a bicyclist on the sidewalk outside the Valencia Gardens Apartments sparked community outrage.

    Guests:
    LaDoris Cordell, Independent Police Auditor, City of San Jose
    C.W. Nevius, San Francisco Chronicle columnist

    Further Reporting: Policing in the Age of YouTube: S.F. Police to Join Ranks of Camera-Toting Cops

    Delicious Drama
    An organic farmer struggles to wring a harvest from the sullen earth and contemplates suicide when he fails. A young woman learns to bake coconut cake the way her grandmother did. What we eat, where it comes from, and what it says about us are themes that the Berkeley Repertory Theatre is tackling in an ambitious series of performances commissioned from writers around the country. This report takes us behind the scenes with San Francisco-based playwrights Octavio Solis and Lauren Gunderson as they research and write their short dramas. Watch the segment here (YouTube).
    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 7:00 pm
    Local USA [#105] Native American Culture Three stories about the modern Native American culture: A look at how climate change is effecting a Pacific Northwest tribe known as the "Salmon People" and how science can help find a solution; the Lincoln, Nebraska rock star artist who's creating sculptures, linking the past to the present; and the fight an Oklahoma tribe tries to revive their fading language. duration 26:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:30 pm
    Local USA [#104] Head Trauma at War Traumatic brain injuries, or TBI, has received increasing attention especially among athletes and soldiers returning from combat in Iraq and Afghanistan. We examine the links between TBI and post-traumatic stress disorder, and the damage they can do, through the story of retired Army sergeant Andrew Reeves of Colchester, Vermont. duration 26:52   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#246H] Zombie Politics and Casino Capitalism In his book Zombie Politics and Culture in the Age of Casino Capitalism, author and scholar Henry Giroux connects the dots, threading together ideas and experiences to prove his theory that our current system is informed by a "machinery of social and civil death" that chills "any vestige of a robust democracy." This week on Moyers &Company (check local listings), Giroux explains that such a machine turns people into zombies - "people who are basically so caught up with surviving that they become like the walking dead - they lose their sense of agency, they lose their homes, they lose their jobs." What's more, Giroux points out, the system that creates this vacuum has little to do with expanding the meaning and the substance of democracy itself. Under "casino capitalism," the goal is to get a quick return, taking advantage of a kind of logic in which the only thing that drives us is to put as much money as we can into a slot machine and hope we walk out with our wallets overflowing. A cultural and social critic of tireless energy and vast interests, Giroux holds the Global TV Network Chair in the English and Cultural Studies Department at McMaster University and is a distinguished visiting professor at Reyerson University, both schools in Canada. Described by Moyers as "torch bearer in the art and science of teaching," he has been an important contributor in a variety of academic fields, including cultural, youth and media studies. Also on the broadcast, Bill Moyers remembers a 2003 interview with Nobel-prize winning novelist Doris Lessing who passed away this week in London at the age of 94. And a look at "Birth of the Living Dead", a mesmerizing new documentary that examines the singular time in which the classic film "Night of the Living Dead" was shot - when civil unrest and violence gave the nation nightmares, and zombies were a metaphor for an American public troubled and distressed. duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 pm
    America Reframed [#203] The Medicine Game This program shares the remarkable journey of two brothers from the Onondaga Nation driven by a single goal; to beat the odds and play lacrosse for national powerhouse Syracuse University. The obstacles in their way are frequent and daunting. In their darkest hour, and with their dreams crumbling around them, the boys must look to their family and to their Native teachings for guidance and stability. It is their search for identity that transitions this film from a playful coming of age story, into an important study of modern Native American life. It follows their story over the next six years as they struggle to rebuild their friendship, rescue a fading childhood dream, and gain a more resolute understanding of their identity and culture, both as athletes and the next generation of the Onondaga people. duration 1:26:39   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:30 pm
    Injunuity Injunuity is a collage of reflections on the Native American world, our shared past, our turbulent present, and our undiscovered future. From Columbus to the western expansion to tribal casinos, we are taught that the Native way, while at times glorious, is something of the past, something that needed to be replaced by a manifest destiny from across the ocean. But in a world increasingly short of real answers, it is time we looked to Native wisdom for guidance. It is time for some Injunuity.
    Injunuity is a mix of animation, music, and real thoughts from real people exploring our world from the Native American perspective. Every word spoken is verbatim, every thought and opinion is real, told in nine short pieces and covering such topics as language preservation, sacred sites, and the environment. But rather than simply revisit our history, the goal of Injunuity is to help define our future, to try and figure out the path that lies before us, to focus on where we are going as well as where we have been.
    duration 29:06   STEREO TV14 (Secondary audio: none)
  • 11:00 pm
    Global Voices [#608] Behind The Rainbow More than a decade after the inauguration of Nelson Mandela, South Africa was slated to become the host of the World Cup in 2010 - a public affirmation of its break with its violent legacy of apartheid. But while the founding Freedom Charter of the African National Congress (ANC) outlined ideals for "a better life for all," harsh inequalities still existed, from xenophobic attacks to corruption scandals and township protests. As a new decade looms, post-apartheid South Africa is at a crucial and dangerous crossroads.
    With the 2009 presidential election as a backdrop, this documentary gives a previously untold account of the country's political problems, struggles, and realities. It explores the transition of the ANC from a liberation organization into South Africa's ruling party, through the evolution of the relationship between two of its most prominent veterans, Thabo Mbeki and Jacob Zuma.
    Exiled under apartheid, they were once brothers in arms. Under Mandela's administration, they loyally labored to build a non-racial state. Now, they are bitter rivals. Their duel threatens to tear apart the ANC and the country, as the poor desperately seek hope in change and the elite fight for the spoils of victory. The film features key interviews with ANC current and former leaders, including Jacob Zuma, Kgalema Motlanthe, Pallo Jordan, Thabo Mbeki, and Terror Lekota. Examining previous events that the country's political decision-makers have agreed to bury for the sake of democracy, this is a behind-the-scenes look at South Africa's seemingly miraculous transformation.
    duration 1:25:07   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:30 am
    Seeking Water from the Sun This documentary takes viewers on a journey into the drama of scientific innovation and the harsh reality of life without water. It ventures into university laboratories and across the Navajo reservation to explore a way of life that revolves around water - and its scarcity. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
Sunday, November 24, 2013

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TV Technical Issues

TV
    TV Technical Issues
    • Wed 10/15 morning: KQED Plus (KQEH) Over the Air signal down

      UPDATE: This problem has been resolved, and the OTA signal for the DT54 channels restored. (DT54.1 through 54.5) KQED Plus’ Over the Air transmission is currently off air via our KQEH transmitter on Monument Peak northeast of San Jose. Technicians are working on the problem. No current estimate regarding how long this will exist. We […]

    • KQET (DT25) Over the Air: Wed 8/27

      We are aware of the break-up issues for our DT25 Over the Air signal in the Monterey/Salinas area. This will also affect viewers of any cable or satellite signal provider using that transmitter as their source. Engineers are working on the problem.

    • Week of 8/25: Sutro Tower work (including KQED 9 Over the Air)

      (Affects several San Francisco TV & Radio stations, including KQED 9.1, 9.2 & 9.3) During the week of August 25, Monday through Friday, between 9am and 4pm, several TV and radio stations will be switching to their Auxiliary antennas. This is being done so that the tower crew can perform routine maintenance on the regular […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Comcast 9 and 709
Digital 9.1, 54.2 or 25.1

All widescreen and HD programs

KQED Plus

Channel 54
Comcast 10 and 710
Digital 9.2, 54.1 or 25.2

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life
Comcast 189
Digital 54.3

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Comcast 190
Digital 9.3

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Comcast 191 & 621
Digital 54.5 or 25.3

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Comcast 192
Digital 54.4

Quality children's programming parents love too