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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Saturday, June 15, 2013

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, June 15, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10650] President Obama Gives Green Light to Send Military Aid to Syria * Detroit's Emergency Manager Says the City Will Default on Debt * The Six Month Anniversary of Newtown * Mark Shields and David Brooks Analyze This Week's News * Collaboration to Discuss the Future of the Dairy Industry duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#32138] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2924] Tavis talks with former Major League Baseball star pitcher Dwight Gooden about his candid new memoir, Doc. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    AfroPop: The Ultimate Cultural Exchange [#303] Riseup Reggae Underground is a journey into the heart of Jamaica - the island that gave birth to the worldwide cultural phenomenon of Reggae. In a society where talent abounds and opportunity is scarce, three distinct and courageous artists fight to rise up from obscurity and write themselves into the pages of history. With music and appearances by legends Lee "Scratch" Perry, Sly Dunbar and Robbie Shakespeare. duration 57:23   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1641] IRISH RECONCILIATION - The G8 economic summit begins shortly in Enniskillen, Northern Ireland, scene of a sectarian bombing that killed 11 people in 1987 - the work of the Irish Republican Army. But, as David Tereshchuk reports, efforts to reconcile the Catholic and Protestant communities since then were sparked by the father of one of the victims, who declared at the time that the bombers should be forgiven, and that he would pray for them every night.
    RUSSELL MOORE - The Southern Baptist Convention, the nation's largest Protestant denomination, has long advocated for conservative values in the public square. The denomination's new national leader on matters of ethics and public policy, Russell Moore, shares those values, but has a different style from many previous Southern Baptist leaders. Moore talks with managing editor Kim Lawton about how he hopes to set a tone of "kindness" and expand the slate of issues that Southern Baptists care about.
    THE ETHICS OF GOVERNMENT DATA COLLECTION - Host Bob Abernethy talks with Michael Kessler, Associate Director of Georgetown University's Berkley Center for Religion, Peace and World Affairs, about what religious and ethical traditions have to say about the government's massive collection of electronic data. How should we balance respect for privacy versus national security?
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#951] Global Opportunities This week: an exclusive interview with Brandywine Global Opportunities Bond Fund's "Great Investor" Stephen Smith, a maverick bond investor who delivers stock market-like returns. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2214H] IMMIGRATION REFORM: The panelists discuss whether current immigration law is gender discriminating.
    MOTHER BREADWINNERS: Looking at the rising number of households with mothers being the source of primary income.
    SURROGACY AND SINGLE DADS: Single men are pursing alternatives ways to becoming fathers.
    Panelists: Democratic Commentator Debra Carnahan, Libertarian Commentator Nicole Kurokawa Neily, and special male guests: UPTOWN Magazine Chief Political Correspondent Charles Ellison, Campaign for America's Future Online Producer Terrance Heath.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    Asia Insight [#106] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    Helen of Troy Bettany Hughes travels across the eastern Mediterranean on an epic journey to find out the truth about Helen of Troy, known as "the face that launched a thousand ships." She has been blamed for causing the Trojan War, a conflict that resulted in countless deaths. During her own voyage in Helen's wake, Bettany Hughes sorts the reality from the myths told about Helen. She travels from the city where it is said Helen was born - Sparta in the mountains of Greece - to the archaeological site in modern Turkey that will be forever linked with the war fought in Helen's name: Troy. duration 1:56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
    Moyers & Company [#223H] Big Brother's Prying Eyes Whatever your take on the recent revelations about government spying on our phone calls and Internet activity, there's no denying that Big Brother is bigger and less brotherly than we thought. What's the resulting cost to our privacy - and more so, our democracy? This week Lawrence Lessig, professor of law and director of the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics at Harvard University and founder of Stanford Law School's Center for Internet and Society, joins Bill to discuss the implications of our government's actions and Edward Snowden's role in leaking the information.
    Few are as knowledgeable about the impact of the Internet on our public and private lives as Lessig, who argues that government needs to protect American rights with the same determination and technological sophistication it uses to invade our privacy and root out terrorists. "What do we put into place to check government officials to make sure they behave in a way that respects our most fundamental values?" Lessig asks.
    A former conservative who's now a liberal, Lessig also knows that the caustic impact of money is another weapon capable of mortally wounding democracy. His recent book, "Republic, Lost: How Money Corrupts Congress - and a Plan to Stop It", decries a pervasive "dependence corruption" in our government and politics that should sound a desperate alarm for both the Left and the Right. On the broadcast, Lessig outlines a radical approach to the problem that uses big money itself to reform big money-powered corruption.
    How do we protect our privacy when Big Government and Big Business morph into Big Brother? Next on Moyers & Company.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 8:00 am
    LinkAsia [#146] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2509H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 am
    Washington Week [#5250H] * US and foreign intelligence agencies have determined that Syria has used chemical weapons against opposition forces multiple times over the past year. President Barack Obama has said that the use of chemical weapons by Syrian President Bashar al-Assad would cross a "red line" for the US. Late Thursday the White House announced that the US will provide military assistance to some rebel forces but released few specifics on the extent of America's involvement in Syria's civil war. Mark Mazzetti of The New York Times will have the latest on this developing story.
    * Following the disclosures of the NSA's widespread anti-terrorism surveillance programs, there is a political debate over whether Edward Snowden, the former CIA contractor who leaked top-secret information, was acting as a whistleblower or traitor. Karen Tumulty of The Washington Post will have the latest on investigations into the government's data-monitoring activities and the international search for Snowden.
    * On Capitol Hill, lawmakers moved forward in considering comprehensive immigration reform. The Senate is debating a bill that would strengthen border security and require all U.S. businesses to check the immigration status of new hires. Alan Gomez of USA Today will have details of the bipartisan effort to create a path to citizenship for some 11 million people currently in the country illegally and hurdles still to be faced in the House.
    * Plus Joan Biskupic of Reuters will explain the significance of today's Supreme Court decision that prohibits human genes from being patented but allows artificially copied DNA to be claimed as intellectual property. Plus we'll look ahead at the three major cases yet to be decided this term dealing with same-sex marriage, affirmative action and voting rights.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:30 am
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2433] June 14, 2013 Guest Host: Dana King.
    News Panel:
    STATE BUDGET DEAL - Gov. Jerry Brown and top Democrats in the legislature reached a $96.4 billion budget deal this week, putting them on track to meet the June 15 deadline. The compromise plan embraces the governor's cautious revenue outlook, and gives more money to schools with higher numbers of low income students and English learners. It also includes some additional spending on mental health and dental services for the poor, with a commitment to increased funding in the future for social services.
    SCOTUS ON GENE PATENTING - The US Supreme Court has unanimously ruled that companies cannot patent naturally occurring human genes, sending ripples through the medical and biotechnology industries. With billions of dollars on the line, some companies might abandon work on genetic research if they are unable protect it through patents. But it could also encourage more research and competition, opening the door to new discoveries.
    SAN ONOFRE CLOSURE - While California pledges to cut greenhouse gas emissions, the San Onofre nuclear plant in Southern California is closing. Some environmentalists and policy makers who are concerned about global warming have come to embrace nuclear power, which, unlike natural gas or coal powered energy plants, does not emit carbon into the atmosphere. What will the end of nuclear power mean for growing energy demand and how will the state offset the increased pollution caused by fossil fuel generated power?
    Guests: Dan Walters, Sacramento Bee; Lauren Sommer, KQED Science; and David R. Baker, San Francisco Chronicle.
    DANIEL ELLSBERG ON THE NSA LEAKS - Members of Congress, including California Democratic Senator Diane Feinstein, say Edward Snowden is a traitor who should be prosecuted for revealing classified information about the National Security Agency's domestic surveillance programs. Calling him a modern-day Daniel Ellsberg, supporters around the world are taking to the streets in defense of Snowden. Ellsberg himself, whose infamous leak of the Pentagon Papers led to public outrage over the Vietnam War, says Snowden's disclosures are the most important in US history. Daniel Ellsberg joins guest host Dana King in studio for a conversation about domestic surveillance and the debate over espionage vs. whistle-blowing.
    duration 27:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:00 am
    BBC Newsnight [#17165Z] duration 28:18   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2214H] IMMIGRATION REFORM: The panelists discuss whether current immigration law is gender discriminating.
    MOTHER BREADWINNERS: Looking at the rising number of households with mothers being the source of primary income.
    SURROGACY AND SINGLE DADS: Single men are pursing alternatives ways to becoming fathers.
    Panelists: Democratic Commentator Debra Carnahan, Libertarian Commentator Nicole Kurokawa Neily, and special male guests: UPTOWN Magazine Chief Political Correspondent Charles Ellison, Campaign for America's Future Online Producer Terrance Heath.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3125] Topics: NSA's Sweeping Surveillance, Edward Snowden - Traitor or Whistleblower? Panelists: Pat Buchanan, Author & Columnist; Susan Ferrechio, Washington Examiner; Mort Zuckerman, US News & World Report; Eleanor Clift, Newsweek. duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Need To Know [#324H] RAY SUAREZ ANCHORS. Medical correspondent Dr. Emily Senay investigates readmission penalties, an element of the Affordable Care Act designed to reduce costs and lead to more coordinated healthcare once patients are released from the hospital. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#223H] Big Brother's Prying Eyes Whatever your take on the recent revelations about government spying on our phone calls and Internet activity, there's no denying that Big Brother is bigger and less brotherly than we thought. What's the resulting cost to our privacy - and more so, our democracy? This week Lawrence Lessig, professor of law and director of the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics at Harvard University and founder of Stanford Law School's Center for Internet and Society, joins Bill to discuss the implications of our government's actions and Edward Snowden's role in leaking the information.
    Few are as knowledgeable about the impact of the Internet on our public and private lives as Lessig, who argues that government needs to protect American rights with the same determination and technological sophistication it uses to invade our privacy and root out terrorists. "What do we put into place to check government officials to make sure they behave in a way that respects our most fundamental values?" Lessig asks.
    A former conservative who's now a liberal, Lessig also knows that the caustic impact of money is another weapon capable of mortally wounding democracy. His recent book, "Republic, Lost: How Money Corrupts Congress - and a Plan to Stop It", decries a pervasive "dependence corruption" in our government and politics that should sound a desperate alarm for both the Left and the Right. On the broadcast, Lessig outlines a radical approach to the problem that uses big money itself to reform big money-powered corruption.
    How do we protect our privacy when Big Government and Big Business morph into Big Brother? Next on Moyers & Company.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:00 pm
    Saving The Ocean [#101H] Shark Reef In the first episode, host Carl Safina travels to Glover's Reef Marine Reserve, a coral atoll in the central American country of Belize. Accompanied by a team of U.S. researchers, who've been studying the reserve for eight years, Carl catches, tags and releases a wide variety of sharks. He scuba dives to check out the shark-counting instruments that the researchers have placed around the atoll, and he also visits the shark fin trader in Belize City's fish market. The fin trade now threatens sharks worldwide, but the sharks in Glover's Reef Reserve are safe and thriving. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 1:30 pm
    BioCentury This Week [#225] duration 25:40   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    Panetta Institute Lectures [#804] Middle East Turmoil: Chaos Or Reform? This lecture features:
    Ehud Barak (invited), former Israeli minister of Defense and prime minister;
    Richard Lugar, former United States senator and former chairman of the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations;
    Olympia Snowe (invited), former United States senator for Maine;
    and Joe Lieberman, former United States senator for Connecticut.
    duration 1:29:30   STEREO TVG
  • 3:30 pm
    Maria Hinojosa: One-On-One [#423] Jarrett Barrios Since 2009 Jarrett Barrios has been the president of the Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation (GLAAD), which works to promote and ensure fair, accurate and inclusive representation of the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender community in the media. Barrios joined GLAAD after serving nine years in the Massachusetts legislature where he was the first Latino and first openly gay man elected to the state Senate. Jarrett Barrios talks with Maria Hinojosa about the importance of coming out, his personal experience as a married man with two teens, and reaching full equality in America. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 4:00 pm
    Independent Lens [#1225H] Two Spirits Fred Martinez was one of the youngest hate-crime victims in modern history when he was brutally murdered at 16. This film explores the life and death of a boy, who was also a girl, and the essentially spiritual nature of gender. duration 56:16   STEREO TV14-L (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 5:00 pm
    Grove, The More Americans have been lost to AIDS than in all the US wars since 1900. And the pandemic has killed 22 million people worldwide. But few know about the existence of the National AIDS Memorial, a 7-acre grove hidden in San Francisco's Golden Gate Park. This program chronicles this garden's transformation from a neglected eyesore to landscaped sanctuary to national memorial. The film shows how a community in crisis found healing and remembrance, and how the seeds of a few visionary environmentalists blossomed into something larger than they could have imagined. But as the Grove's stakeholders seek broader public recognition through an international design competition, a battle erupts over what constitutes an appropriate memorial for the AIDS pandemic. What does it mean to be a national memorial? And how do we mark a time of unimaginable loss? duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3125] Topics: NSA's Sweeping Surveillance, Edward Snowden - Traitor or Whistleblower? Panelists: Pat Buchanan, Author & Columnist; Susan Ferrechio, Washington Examiner; Mort Zuckerman, US News & World Report; Eleanor Clift, Newsweek. duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Washington Week [#5250H] * US and foreign intelligence agencies have determined that Syria has used chemical weapons against opposition forces multiple times over the past year. President Barack Obama has said that the use of chemical weapons by Syrian President Bashar al-Assad would cross a "red line" for the US. Late Thursday the White House announced that the US will provide military assistance to some rebel forces but released few specifics on the extent of America's involvement in Syria's civil war. Mark Mazzetti of The New York Times will have the latest on this developing story.
    * Following the disclosures of the NSA's widespread anti-terrorism surveillance programs, there is a political debate over whether Edward Snowden, the former CIA contractor who leaked top-secret information, was acting as a whistleblower or traitor. Karen Tumulty of The Washington Post will have the latest on investigations into the government's data-monitoring activities and the international search for Snowden.
    * On Capitol Hill, lawmakers moved forward in considering comprehensive immigration reform. The Senate is debating a bill that would strengthen border security and require all U.S. businesses to check the immigration status of new hires. Alan Gomez of USA Today will have details of the bipartisan effort to create a path to citizenship for some 11 million people currently in the country illegally and hurdles still to be faced in the House.
    * Plus Joan Biskupic of Reuters will explain the significance of today's Supreme Court decision that prohibits human genes from being patented but allows artificially copied DNA to be claimed as intellectual property. Plus we'll look ahead at the three major cases yet to be decided this term dealing with same-sex marriage, affirmative action and voting rights.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 pm
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2433] June 14, 2013 Guest Host: Dana King.
    News Panel:
    STATE BUDGET DEAL - Gov. Jerry Brown and top Democrats in the legislature reached a $96.4 billion budget deal this week, putting them on track to meet the June 15 deadline. The compromise plan embraces the governor's cautious revenue outlook, and gives more money to schools with higher numbers of low income students and English learners. It also includes some additional spending on mental health and dental services for the poor, with a commitment to increased funding in the future for social services.
    SCOTUS ON GENE PATENTING - The US Supreme Court has unanimously ruled that companies cannot patent naturally occurring human genes, sending ripples through the medical and biotechnology industries. With billions of dollars on the line, some companies might abandon work on genetic research if they are unable protect it through patents. But it could also encourage more research and competition, opening the door to new discoveries.
    SAN ONOFRE CLOSURE - While California pledges to cut greenhouse gas emissions, the San Onofre nuclear plant in Southern California is closing. Some environmentalists and policy makers who are concerned about global warming have come to embrace nuclear power, which, unlike natural gas or coal powered energy plants, does not emit carbon into the atmosphere. What will the end of nuclear power mean for growing energy demand and how will the state offset the increased pollution caused by fossil fuel generated power?
    Guests: Dan Walters, Sacramento Bee; Lauren Sommer, KQED Science; and David R. Baker, San Francisco Chronicle.
    DANIEL ELLSBERG ON THE NSA LEAKS - Members of Congress, including California Democratic Senator Diane Feinstein, say Edward Snowden is a traitor who should be prosecuted for revealing classified information about the National Security Agency's domestic surveillance programs. Calling him a modern-day Daniel Ellsberg, supporters around the world are taking to the streets in defense of Snowden. Ellsberg himself, whose infamous leak of the Pentagon Papers led to public outrage over the Vietnam War, says Snowden's disclosures are the most important in US history. Daniel Ellsberg joins guest host Dana King in studio for a conversation about domestic surveillance and the debate over espionage vs. whistle-blowing.
    duration 27:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:30 pm
    Saving The Ocean [#101H] Shark Reef In the first episode, host Carl Safina travels to Glover's Reef Marine Reserve, a coral atoll in the central American country of Belize. Accompanied by a team of U.S. researchers, who've been studying the reserve for eight years, Carl catches, tags and releases a wide variety of sharks. He scuba dives to check out the shark-counting instruments that the researchers have placed around the atoll, and he also visits the shark fin trader in Belize City's fish market. The fin trade now threatens sharks worldwide, but the sharks in Glover's Reef Reserve are safe and thriving. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1210] Bangladesh Holly begins her trip in Dhaka, the capital of Bangladesh and the seventh largest city in the world. She then travels to Sunderban National Park for an encounter with Bengal tigers and a trek deep into the forest to find honey. Along the way, Holly visits a "floating" school, charms snakes, harvests tea in the hills of Sylhet, visits the ship-breaking yards in Chittagong and relaxes in the seaside resort of Cox's Bazaar near the Myanmar border. duration 57:16   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 9:00 pm
    Ferrets: The Pursuit of Excellence The program travels to Ohio and the annual Ferret Buckeye Bash -- the home to the largest and most popular ferret show in the country, where hundreds of top breeders, seasoned experts and ferret enthusiasts pamper and parade their pets in a quest for prizes and prestige. Though these mischievous creatures are unlikely show animals, the competition is intense. For top breeders, the Best in Show award is the ultimate validation of their breeding stock though the many ferret fanatics whose "fuzzies" don't win a prize insist that beauty remains in the eye of the beholder. duration 56:37   STEREO TVPG
  • 10:00 pm
    Amish: American Experience On October 2, 2006, a 32-year-old milk truck driver named Charles Roberts entered a one-room schoolhouse in the Amish community of Nickel Mines in Lancaster County, PA, and shot 10 young girls, killing five, before committing suicide as police officers stormed the school. Just hours after the shooting, Amish community members visited the gunman's family to offer forgiveness. These events horrified the nation for the senseless brutality of the shootings and left many questioning and haunted by the victims' startling response. The film answers many questions about this insistently insular religious community. With unprecedented access to the Amish built on patience and hard-won trust, the film is the first to penetrate and explore this attention-averse group. It paints an extraordinarily intimate portrait of contemporary Amish faith and life. It questions why and how the Amish, an insistently closed and communal culture, have thrived within one of the most open, individualistic societies on earth; explores how, despite their ingrained submissiveness, the Amish have successfully asserted themselves in resisting the encroachments of modern society and government; asks what American's attraction to the Amish says about deep American values; and looks at what the future holds for a community whose existence is so rooted in the past. duration 1:56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:00 am
    America Reframed [#111] Red Without Blue The intimate bond between two identical twin brothers is challenged when one decides to transition from male to female; this is the story of their evolving relationship, and the resurrection of their family from a darker past. duration 1:26:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
Saturday, June 15, 2013

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TV Technical Issues

TV
    TV Technical Issues
    • Mon 11/03/14: Work on KQED Plus tower (DT54)

      Another station needs to do maintenance on its equipment on the tower on Monument Peak, requiring that we switch our DT54 Over the Air signal from the main antenna to the auxiliary when the work starts, then back to the main antenna at the conclusion. These switches should cause momentary outages only, and most receivers […]

    • Wed 10/15 morning: KQED Plus (KQEH) Over the Air signal down

      UPDATE: This problem has been resolved, and the OTA signal for the DT54 channels restored. (DT54.1 through 54.5) KQED Plus’ Over the Air transmission is currently off air via our KQEH transmitter on Monument Peak northeast of San Jose. Technicians are working on the problem. No current estimate regarding how long this will exist. We […]

    • KQET (DT25) Over the Air: Wed 8/27

      We are aware of the break-up issues for our DT25 Over the Air signal in the Monterey/Salinas area. This will also affect viewers of any cable or satellite signal provider using that transmitter as their source. Engineers are working on the problem.

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Channels 9.1, 54.2 & 25.1 - Monterey (KQET)
XFINITY 9 and HD 709

All widescreen and HD programs

KQED Plus

KQED +
Channels 54, 54.1, 9.2 & 25.2 - Monterey
XFINITY 10 and HD 2710

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life
Channel 54.3
XFINITY 189

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Channel 9.3
XFINITY 190

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Channel 54.5 & 25.3
XFINITY 191 & 621

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Channel 54.4
XFINITY 192

Quality children's programming parents love too