Donate

TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus. Read more about this transition on our FAQ page.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Sunday, June 9, 2013

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Sunday, June 9, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    America Reframed [#116] Trembling Before God A cinematic portrait of various gay Orthodox Jews who struggle to reconcile their faith and their sexual orientation. duration 1:46:58   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Teaching Channel Presents [#214] Math & English Essentials Math & English Essentials: Some may think that math and English classes have nothing in common, but as we take a look inside several high school classrooms around the country we'll see they all share a common purpose: make learning relevant. duration 59:00   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Moyers & Company [#222H] Taming Capitalism Run Wild Modern American capitalism is a story of continued inequality and hardship. Even a modest increase in the minimum wage faces opposition from those who seem to show allegiance first and foremost to America's wealthy and powerful. Yet some aren't just wringing their hands about our economic crisis; they're fighting back.
    In an encore broadcast, economist Richard Wolff joins Bill to shine light on the disaster left behind in capitalism's wake, and to discuss the fight for economic justice, including a fair minimum wage. A Professor of Economics Emeritus at the University of Massachusetts, and currently Visiting Professor in the Graduate Program in International Affairs of the New School, Wolff has written many books on the effects of rampant capitalism, including Capitalism Hits the Fan: The Global Economic Meltdown and What to Do About It.
    "We have this disparity getting wider and wider between those for whom capitalism continues to deliver the goods by all means, [and] a growing majority in this society facing harder and harder times," Wolff tells Bill. "And that's what provokes some of us to say it's a systemic problem."
    duration 52:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5249] duration 24:10   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:30 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3124] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 5:00 am
    Need To Know [#323H] SCOTT SIMON ANCHORS. Correspondent John Larson travels to Ohio to assess how workers there are faring after the loss of millions of manufacturing jobs over the past 35 years. It's the fourth in Need to Know's series of "Main Street" reports. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2508H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    America Reframed [#116] Trembling Before God A cinematic portrait of various gay Orthodox Jews who struggle to reconcile their faith and their sexual orientation. duration 1:46:58   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1640] MASS INCARCERATION - More than 40 years after the civil rights movement that ended legal segregation, African American men are 6 times more likely than whites to be imprisoned, especially for drug offenses, in what has been called a "human rights nightmare." As Deborah Potter reports, churches often provide ministries to prison inmates - but insufficient support when those inmates are released and in need of jobs and housing that could prevent them from returning to prison. (OB: January 13, 2013)
    JONI EARECKSON TADA: BREAST CANCER UPDATE - Actress Angelina Jolie's announcement last month that she had undergone a preventative double mastectomy to reduce her chances of developing breast cancer put a new spotlight on the disease. According to the American Cancer Society, about 1 in 8 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer at some point. Managing editor Kim Lawton talked with popular evangelical author and speaker Joni Eareckson Tada, one of the longest surviving quadriplegics on record, about her battle with the disease and how it affected her marriage and her faith. (OB: October 26, 2012)
    WHIRLING DERVISHES - Like other major religions, Islam has a mystical branch, Sufism, which teaches many ways to experience spiritual union with the divine. One of those paths - dating from the 13th century - is dance, specifically the dancing of whirling dervishes, who were followers of the poet Rumi. Manjula Kumar, a program manager at the Smithsonian Institution, describes the origins and meaning of whirling dervish dancing. (OB: February 1, 2013)
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#950] Financial Thought Leaders: Robert Shiller Why is renowned Yale economist Robert Shiller, who predicted the bursting of the tech and housing bubbles, now calling the bond market "dangerous?" A "Financial Thought Leader" and visionary, Shiller shares his views and advice on the stock, bond and housing markets on this week's WT. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 am
    Truth About Money with Ric Edelman [#219H] Ric Edelman's staff explores the importance of professional guidance with Captain Mo - one of Key West's top shark-fishing captains. Then, Ric visits Las Vegas to get investment advice from Rick, Corey and "the old man" - the "Pawn Stars". duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2508H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3124] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    Washington Week [#5249H] * The National Security Agency (NSA) is reportedly collecting millions of Verizon customers' telephone records. Under the top-secret order, the government cannot record calls but it can obtain the telephone numbers, location, time and duration of calls. The Obama administration defends the order saying it is a critical tool in protecting the nation from terrorist threats. And while some top Republican and Democratic members of the Senate Intelligence Committee support the practice, key House Democrats are calling for an investigation into the NSA. Pete Williams of NBC News will report on why these new revelations are reigniting the debate over data mining and the scope of government surveillance since the September 11, 2001 terror attacks.
    * This week President Barack Obama announced a major shakeup of his national security team. He appointed UN Ambassador Rice to succeed national security adviser Tom Donilon. Rice has been the target of harsh criticism from congressional Republicans over her handling of last year's deadly attacks on the US consulate in Benghazi, Libya. The president also nominated White House aide and Pulitzer Prize-winning author Samantha Power to succeed Rice at the United Nations. David Sanger of The New York Times will take a closer look at the president's second-term foreign policy team. Plus he'll preview this weekend's crucial summit in California between President Obama and China's new President Xi Jinping.
    * Lawmakers continue to work on a plan to change how the armed forces deal with an epidemic of sexual assaults in the military. Martha Raddatz of ABC News will report on a range of measures being considered to protect female and male victims who file assault complaints as well as ways to limit military commanders' ability to overturn convictions for rape and other sexual assaults.
    duration 24:10   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2432] June 7, 2013 Guest Host: Thuy Vu.
    News Panel:
    OBAMACARE - President Obama visits Silicon Valley this week during a fundraising swing through the state. Mr. Obama gives a speech in San Jose on Friday to shore up concerns about the Affordable Care Act as the health-care overhaul rolls out in California, ahead of the rest of the nation. KQED's Obamacare Explained: A Guide for Californians provides some answers for consumers.
    CYBERSPYING AND CHINA - Cyber-security will be high on the agenda this week when Chinese President Xi Jinping meets with US President Barack Obama in California. At stake is whether American businesses, and especially Silicon Valley companies like Apple and Google, can protect themselves from hackers snooping for corporate secrets or intellectual property.
    PHONE SURVEILLANCE - A leaked top secret court order reveals that the phone records of millions of US citizens are being collected in bulk by the National Security Administration. The order, first reported by the Guardian, requires the telecommunications giant Verizon to turn over information about all telephone calls in its system during a 3 month period. Top leaders of the Senate Intelligence Committee are defending the practice, saying the widespread monitoring effort has been ongoing for several years.
    Guests: Lisa Aliferis, KQED State of Health; Joseph Menn, Reuters; and Troy Wolverton, San Jose Mercury News.
    REBELS WITH A CAUSE - Bay Area husband and wife team Nancy Kelly and Kenji Yamamoto talk about their latest film "Rebels With A Cause." The documentary spotlights ordinary citizens who fought to preserve open space in what are now the Point Reyes National Seashore and the Golden Gate National Recreation Area. "Rebels With A Cause" is currently playing in Bay Area theaters.
    duration 27:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#222H] Taming Capitalism Run Wild Modern American capitalism is a story of continued inequality and hardship. Even a modest increase in the minimum wage faces opposition from those who seem to show allegiance first and foremost to America's wealthy and powerful. Yet some aren't just wringing their hands about our economic crisis; they're fighting back.
    In an encore broadcast, economist Richard Wolff joins Bill to shine light on the disaster left behind in capitalism's wake, and to discuss the fight for economic justice, including a fair minimum wage. A Professor of Economics Emeritus at the University of Massachusetts, and currently Visiting Professor in the Graduate Program in International Affairs of the New School, Wolff has written many books on the effects of rampant capitalism, including Capitalism Hits the Fan: The Global Economic Meltdown and What to Do About It.
    "We have this disparity getting wider and wider between those for whom capitalism continues to deliver the goods by all means, [and] a growing majority in this society facing harder and harder times," Wolff tells Bill. "And that's what provokes some of us to say it's a systemic problem."
    duration 52:46   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:30 pm
    Inside Washington [#2508H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:00 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3124] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 1:30 pm
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2206H] ENVIRONMENTAL RACISM: Does pollution disproportionately affect women of color? Why the NAACP is taking on this issue.
    FLAME RETARDANT DANGERS: Chemicals in furniture that are meant to keep you safe may cause big health problems.
    Panelists: Dr. Avis Jones-DeWeever, Host of National Public Radio Focus Point; Jennifer Marshall, The Heritage Foundation; Amanda Terkel, The Huffington Post; Rina Shah, Republican Strategist; Renee Sharp, Environmental Working Group Director of Research.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 2:00 pm
    LinkAsia [#145] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 2:30 pm
    Unlocking The Secrets of Our Cells - The Nobel Prize Inside all of us exists a series of micro-worlds at the cellular, molecular and atomic level, constantly working to maintain our existence, but of which we are blissfully unaware. The 2012 Nobel Laureates in Physiology or Medicine, Physics and Chemistry, have all unveiled new knowledge about this micro-world; this program explores their work, going on a journey through the micro-layers, showing how the discoveries they have made influence all our lives. Inside all of our cells is the next - molecular- level of the micro-world. The 2012 laureates in Chemistry identified and mapped the molecules that enable cells, and therefore our bodies, to react to the outside world. Robert Lefkowitz takes us through the long journey he went through to identify and map the protein responsible for transmitting outside influences into the cell so it can react - for example, in the adrenaline response in the body. He describes his and Brian Kobilka's work - and how it felt when they realized they'd made their groundbreaking discovery. The micro-world is going on all around us and, were it not for the work of this year's laureates, many of its secrets would still remain hidden. duration 28:51   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 3:00 pm
    Need To Know [#323H] SCOTT SIMON ANCHORS. Correspondent John Larson travels to Ohio to assess how workers there are faring after the loss of millions of manufacturing jobs over the past 35 years. It's the fourth in Need to Know's series of "Main Street" reports. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 pm
    Moyers & Company [#222H] Taming Capitalism Run Wild Modern American capitalism is a story of continued inequality and hardship. Even a modest increase in the minimum wage faces opposition from those who seem to show allegiance first and foremost to America's wealthy and powerful. Yet some aren't just wringing their hands about our economic crisis; they're fighting back.
    In an encore broadcast, economist Richard Wolff joins Bill to shine light on the disaster left behind in capitalism's wake, and to discuss the fight for economic justice, including a fair minimum wage. A Professor of Economics Emeritus at the University of Massachusetts, and currently Visiting Professor in the Graduate Program in International Affairs of the New School, Wolff has written many books on the effects of rampant capitalism, including Capitalism Hits the Fan: The Global Economic Meltdown and What to Do About It.
    "We have this disparity getting wider and wider between those for whom capitalism continues to deliver the goods by all means, [and] a growing majority in this society facing harder and harder times," Wolff tells Bill. "And that's what provokes some of us to say it's a systemic problem."
    duration 52:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 pm
    Washington Week [#5249H] * The National Security Agency (NSA) is reportedly collecting millions of Verizon customers' telephone records. Under the top-secret order, the government cannot record calls but it can obtain the telephone numbers, location, time and duration of calls. The Obama administration defends the order saying it is a critical tool in protecting the nation from terrorist threats. And while some top Republican and Democratic members of the Senate Intelligence Committee support the practice, key House Democrats are calling for an investigation into the NSA. Pete Williams of NBC News will report on why these new revelations are reigniting the debate over data mining and the scope of government surveillance since the September 11, 2001 terror attacks.
    * This week President Barack Obama announced a major shakeup of his national security team. He appointed UN Ambassador Rice to succeed national security adviser Tom Donilon. Rice has been the target of harsh criticism from congressional Republicans over her handling of last year's deadly attacks on the US consulate in Benghazi, Libya. The president also nominated White House aide and Pulitzer Prize-winning author Samantha Power to succeed Rice at the United Nations. David Sanger of The New York Times will take a closer look at the president's second-term foreign policy team. Plus he'll preview this weekend's crucial summit in California between President Obama and China's new President Xi Jinping.
    * Lawmakers continue to work on a plan to change how the armed forces deal with an epidemic of sexual assaults in the military. Martha Raddatz of ABC News will report on a range of measures being considered to protect female and male victims who file assault complaints as well as ways to limit military commanders' ability to overturn convictions for rape and other sexual assaults.
    duration 24:10   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:00 pm
    Inside Washington [#2508H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:30 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3124] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2432] June 7, 2013 Guest Host: Thuy Vu.
    News Panel:
    OBAMACARE - President Obama visits Silicon Valley this week during a fundraising swing through the state. Mr. Obama gives a speech in San Jose on Friday to shore up concerns about the Affordable Care Act as the health-care overhaul rolls out in California, ahead of the rest of the nation. KQED's Obamacare Explained: A Guide for Californians provides some answers for consumers.
    CYBERSPYING AND CHINA - Cyber-security will be high on the agenda this week when Chinese President Xi Jinping meets with US President Barack Obama in California. At stake is whether American businesses, and especially Silicon Valley companies like Apple and Google, can protect themselves from hackers snooping for corporate secrets or intellectual property.
    PHONE SURVEILLANCE - A leaked top secret court order reveals that the phone records of millions of US citizens are being collected in bulk by the National Security Administration. The order, first reported by the Guardian, requires the telecommunications giant Verizon to turn over information about all telephone calls in its system during a 3 month period. Top leaders of the Senate Intelligence Committee are defending the practice, saying the widespread monitoring effort has been ongoing for several years.
    Guests: Lisa Aliferis, KQED State of Health; Joseph Menn, Reuters; and Troy Wolverton, San Jose Mercury News.
    REBELS WITH A CAUSE - Bay Area husband and wife team Nancy Kelly and Kenji Yamamoto talk about their latest film "Rebels With A Cause." The documentary spotlights ordinary citizens who fought to preserve open space in what are now the Point Reyes National Seashore and the Golden Gate National Recreation Area. "Rebels With A Cause" is currently playing in Bay Area theaters.
    duration 27:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Unlocking The Secrets of Our Cells - The Nobel Prize Inside all of us exists a series of micro-worlds at the cellular, molecular and atomic level, constantly working to maintain our existence, but of which we are blissfully unaware. The 2012 Nobel Laureates in Physiology or Medicine, Physics and Chemistry, have all unveiled new knowledge about this micro-world; this program explores their work, going on a journey through the micro-layers, showing how the discoveries they have made influence all our lives. Inside all of our cells is the next - molecular- level of the micro-world. The 2012 laureates in Chemistry identified and mapped the molecules that enable cells, and therefore our bodies, to react to the outside world. Robert Lefkowitz takes us through the long journey he went through to identify and map the protein responsible for transmitting outside influences into the cell so it can react - for example, in the adrenaline response in the body. He describes his and Brian Kobilka's work - and how it felt when they realized they'd made their groundbreaking discovery. The micro-world is going on all around us and, were it not for the work of this year's laureates, many of its secrets would still remain hidden. duration 28:51   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 7:00 pm
    Revolutionaries [#204H] Art & Tech of Google Doodles Meet the team behind Google Doodles, the fun and surprising reimagining of the Google logo that marks holidays, anniversaries and the lives of famous artists, pioneers and scientists. Get a behind-the-scenes look at the creative and technical process of this iconic idea that has become an international phenomenon. duration 53:14   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#222H] Taming Capitalism Run Wild Modern American capitalism is a story of continued inequality and hardship. Even a modest increase in the minimum wage faces opposition from those who seem to show allegiance first and foremost to America's wealthy and powerful. Yet some aren't just wringing their hands about our economic crisis; they're fighting back.
    In an encore broadcast, economist Richard Wolff joins Bill to shine light on the disaster left behind in capitalism's wake, and to discuss the fight for economic justice, including a fair minimum wage. A Professor of Economics Emeritus at the University of Massachusetts, and currently Visiting Professor in the Graduate Program in International Affairs of the New School, Wolff has written many books on the effects of rampant capitalism, including Capitalism Hits the Fan: The Global Economic Meltdown and What to Do About It.
    "We have this disparity getting wider and wider between those for whom capitalism continues to deliver the goods by all means, [and] a growing majority in this society facing harder and harder times," Wolff tells Bill. "And that's what provokes some of us to say it's a systemic problem."
    duration 52:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 pm
    America Reframed [#111] Red Without Blue The intimate bond between two identical twin brothers is challenged when one decides to transition from male to female; this is the story of their evolving relationship, and the resurrection of their family from a darker past. duration 1:26:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:30 pm
    Stonewall Uprising: American Experience [#2309H] This program explores the dramatic event that launched a worldwide rights movement. Told by those who took part, from drag queens and street hustlers to police detectives, journalists and a former mayor of New York, and featuring a rich trove of archival footage, it revisits a time when homosexual acts were illegal throughout America, and homosexuality itself was seen as a form of mental illness. Hunted and often entrapped by undercover police in their hometowns, gays from around the US began fleeing to New York in search of a sanctuary. Hounded there still by an aggressive police force, they found refuge in a Mafia-run gay bar in Greenwich Village, the Stonewall Inn. When police raided Stonewall on June 28, 1969, gay men and women did something they had not done before: they fought back. As the streets of New York erupted into violent protests and street demonstrations, the collective anger announced that the gay rights movement had arrived. duration 1:24:39   STEREO TV14-L (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 12:00 am
    Rajneeshpuram In 1981, Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh, a spiritual leader from India, and thousands of his disciples moved to Wasco and Jefferson Counties. On what had been the Big Muddy Ranch, the "sannyasins" set out to build a new city, a utopian community in the desert - - Rajneeshpuram. Thousands of people from around the world gathered here to celebrate life. They worked hard and transformed the landscape. And more than a few hoped to spend the rest of their days at this place. But by 1986, they were gone. duration 58:11   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
Sunday, June 9, 2013

Navigate By Date

Calendar is loading...
Become a KQED sponsor

TV Technical Issues

TV
    TV Technical Issues
    • DT9s: Sutro Tower testing, early Tues 4/22 1am-5am

      (DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3) KQED (and 3 other local Bay Area stations) will be doing full-load testing on new equipment at Sutro Tower early Tues 4/22 between 1am & 5am. If all goes as planned the KQED transmitter will go off twice during the early part of this period for between 15 and 30 seconds each […]

    • KQED DT9 planned, very short outages, Tues 4/15 (& possibly Wed 4/16)

      (DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3) KQED DT9′s Over the Air (OTA) signal from Sutro Tower will experience a few extremely brief outages on Tuesday 4/15 between 10am and 5pm (and possibly on Wed 4/16 if the work cannot be completed in 1 day). Each outage should be measurable in seconds (not minutes). This work will not affect […]

    • KQET DT25 Planned Outage: early Tues 4/15 (btwn 5am-6am)

      (DT 25.1, 25.2, 25.3) At some point between 5am and 6am early Tuesday 4/15, KQET’s signal from the transmitter on Fremont Peak northeast of Monterey will shut down for a short period of time to allow AT&T to do work on our fiber interface. The outage should be relatively short, but its precise start time […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Comcast 9 and 709
Digital 9.1, 54.2 or 25.1

All widescreen and HD programs

KQED Plus

Channel 54
Comcast 10 and 710
Digital 9.2, 54.1 or 25.2

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life
Comcast 189
Digital 54.3

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Comcast 190
Digital 9.3

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Comcast 191 & 621
Digital 54.5 or 25.3

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Comcast 192
Digital 54.4

Quality children's programming parents love too