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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

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KQED World: Saturday, September 22, 2012

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, September 22, 2012
  • 12:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#31320Z] The iPhone 5 is out and crowds of people around the world stood in line to buy it. But, will trouble with its mapping feature spoil profits for Apple. NBR's New York Correspondent Erika Miller will have details on whether the mapping issues are keeping anyone from buying. Republican Presidential Candidate Mitt Romney releases his 2011 tax returns. NBR's Washington Correspondent Sylvia Hall looks at how much he paid in taxes compared to the rest of Americans. And, the debate over "makers" and "moochers." Who contributes to the U.S. economy and who takes government handouts? NBR's Susie Gharib moderates a debate between two experts on the economy and taxes. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 12:30 am
    BBC Newsnight [#17265Z] duration 28:03   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10460H] Protests in the Muslim world * Hazing * Syria * Presidential Campaign * Shields and Brooks duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 2:00 am
    Charlie Rose [#18195H] (original broadcast date: 9/21/12)
    * Aung San Suu Kyi, Burmese opposition leader and chairperson of the National League for Democracy (NLD) in Burma
    * choreographer Garth Fagan and Grammy Award-winning musician Wynton Marsalis on "Lighthouse/Lightening Rod" which premieres at the Brooklyn Academy of Music on September 27
    * Chef Daniel Humm of Eleven Madison Park in New York City oh his new cookbook
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:00 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2695] Tavis talks with actress-turned-children's books author Jamie Lee Curtis, who explains the premise of her 10th children's book, My Brave Year of Firsts. duration 26:46   STEREO
  • 3:30 am
    Nightly Business Report [#31320Z] The iPhone 5 is out and crowds of people around the world stood in line to buy it. But, will trouble with its mapping feature spoil profits for Apple. NBR's New York Correspondent Erika Miller will have details on whether the mapping issues are keeping anyone from buying. Republican Presidential Candidate Mitt Romney releases his 2011 tax returns. NBR's Washington Correspondent Sylvia Hall looks at how much he paid in taxes compared to the rest of Americans. And, the debate over "makers" and "moochers." Who contributes to the U.S. economy and who takes government handouts? NBR's Susie Gharib moderates a debate between two experts on the economy and taxes. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10460H] Protests in the Muslim world * Hazing * Syria * Presidential Campaign * Shields and Brooks duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:00 am
    Democracy Now! [#2040] duration 59:00   STEREO TVRE
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    Global 3000 [#437] The Deadly Cashew Trees of India For twenty years, the insecticide Endosulfan was sprayed on Cashew trees in India. Now the land is poisoned, and at least six thousand people are terminally ill or already dead from the chemical's effects. Resistance is only gradually taking shape. Also in this edition: Energy in the Wind - a Moroccan wind farm produces green energy. duration 26:10   STEREO
  • 6:30 am
    Focus On Europe [#3037] Independent Kosovo Still Simmers 13 Years After War Kosovo was officially declared fully independent early this week, but the young Balkan state faces many problems. Ethnic tensions between Kosovo Albanians and Serbs still simmer 13 years after the war, and repeatedly threaten to flare up into full-blown violence. duration 26:10   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1603H] FAITH-BASED VOTERS - Managing editor Kim Lawton discusses what the latest polls say about which candidates religious voters are supporting in the close race between President Barack Obama and Governor Mitt Romney.
    CHURCH ENDORSEMENTS AND THE IRS - As 501C3 tax-exempt not-for-profit entities under the tax code, churches are prohibited from endorsing political candidates and risk losing their exemption from paying taxes if they do. Pastors who object to this restriction have announced October 7th as Pulpit Freedom Sunday when they plan to endorse candidates from the pulpit. Lucky Severson talks with pastors who object to this restriction and others who do not and with former IRS official Marcus Owens who says that the IRS has now effectively shut down all investigations into churches accused of violating the endorsement provision.
    VIETNAMESE CATHOLICS IN THE US - In Carthage, Missouri, there is a Catholic order of 150 Vietnamese priests and seminarians, grateful to be safe and free in the US. They are among the Asians and Asian-Americans who now make up 10% of American Catholic priests and brothers. As Judy Valente reports, the Missouri Congregation each year welcomes Vietnamese from all over the country for a 4-day pilgrimage, festival, reunion and retreat to give thanks for their new lives. More than 50, 000 came this year.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#137H] Elections for Sale One of the reasons Moyers & Company frequently returns to the theme of money and politics is because it's absolutely necessary to do so. Nothing corrupts our political system more than the ability of the rich and influential to spend limitless amounts of money - often in secret - with the intention of creating preferred political outcomes. And far from being a regulator of campaign finances, our political funding laws - aided by a corporate-friendly Supreme Court and self-interested politicians - only facilitate the process of empowering the few while subjugating the many.
    Few understand the ways money moves in and out of our political system than campaign finance reform advocate Trevor Potter. A former chairman of the Federal Election Commission and founding president of the Campaign Legal Center, Potter was Stephen Colbert's chief advisor when Colbert formed his own super PAC and 501 (c)(4) in a clever effort to expose the potential for chicanery behind each.
    This week, Bill and Potter discuss how American elections are bought and sold, who covers the cost, and how the rest of us pay the price. "I can assure you that if someone is spending millions of dollars to elect the candidate, the candidate knows where that money is coming from. There's nothing illegal about telling them, but the voters aren't going to know that," Potter tells Bill. "We're creating opportunities for corruption and candidates being beholden to specific private interests because of funding, yet there's no disclosure to the rest of us."
    Also on the show, a Bill Moyers Essay on the bags of money that campaigns drop on consultants and TV ads to affect and distort your point of view.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2423] duration 26:46   TVRE
  • 9:00 am
    Washington Week [#5212H] The political fallout continues following the release of a secretly recorded tape where Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney appears to disparage Americans who receive government assistance. Mr. Romney said that the 47% of Americans who support President Barack Obama think the government should take care of them and that many believe they are "victims." Romney added, "'I'll never convince them that they should take personal responsibility and care for their lives.' While he said he regretted his choice of words, Romney went on to say that he knew those "dependent on government" would not vote for him in November.
    In 2008 Barack Obama was also secretly recorded at a private fundraising event. Then candidate-Obama said rural voters in Pennsylvania and other small towns "cling to their guns or religion." The comments were politically embarrassing but happened during the heated primary race against Hillary Clinton not the general election.
    Several new polls show President Obama has a slight edge over Romney among likely voters and a moderate lead in a number of key swing states. But could the candidates' performances at the upcoming presidential debates change the course of the race? Joining Gwen Ifill with insights and analysis of the race for the White House: John Dickerson of Slate Magazine and CBS News, Gloria Borger of CNN, John Harwood of CNBC and The New York Times, and Sam Youngman of Reuters.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:30 am
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2345H] September 21, 2012 PROP. 32 - Proposition 32 on the November ballot would prohibit employee paycheck deductions from being used for political purposes. Opponents of the ban, including the California Teachers Union, say it is an unfair attempt to restrict their influence, while not placing limitations on spending by wealthy business interests or individuals.
    SAN JOSE CRIME - San Jose, long one of the safest large cities in California, has recently experienced a spike in crime. This week, Police Chief Chris Moore announced his unexpected resignation in January, after two years on the job.
    PUBLIC POWER FOR SAN FRANCISCO - The San Francisco Board of Supervisors has given approval to pave the way for clean public power in San Francisco. Residents would be automatically enrolled in the plan and charged a higher rate than for PG&E, unless they opt out. A similar system is currently in place in Marin County.
    HETCH HETCHY BALLOT MEASURE - If approved by San Francisco voters, Measure F would begin a planning phase for draining and restoring the Hetch Hetchy Reservoir to park land. It is supported by the Sierra Club and other environmental groups. Opponents, including San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee and Senators Boxer and Feinstein, say it is a necessary water source and that the region cannot afford the costs.
    Guests: John Myers, KXTV; Robert Solanga, San Jose Mercury News; Tom Vacar, KTVU; and Paul Rogers, San Jose Mercury News.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:00 am
    QUEST [#607H] Black Holes/Stanford's Camera Traps Hunt for black holes with NASA's new space telescope that uses X-ray vision to try and unlock the secrets of these invisible space oddities. Then, find out what's being done about the alarming amount of plastic that is collecting in the Pacific Ocean. And, uncover the secret lives of animals through motion-activated cameras at Stanford's Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve. duration 26:21   STEREO TVG
  • 10:30 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2128H] PROTECTING WOMEN'S RIGHTS: The 67th session of the UN General Assembly is tackling gender equality and women's participation in politics and the economy.
    MOTHER GIVES DAUGHTER HER WOMB: The first ever successful uterus transplants may mean two women may now be able to conceive and carry babies to term, thanks to their mothers.
    DOES THE RISE OF WOMEN MEAN "THE END OF MEN?": Journalist Hanna Rosin thinks so. She explains in her new book.
    Panelists:Fox News Political Analyst Angela McGlowan; Progressive Commentator Patricia Sosa; Independent Women's Forum Executive Director Sabrina Schaeffer; Democratic Strategist Marjorie Clifton.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3039] The Real Romney Revealed?; Afghan Insider Attacks Up; Poll Bounce. Tim Carney, The Washington Examiner; Eleanor Clift, Newsweek; Mort Zuckerman, US News & World Report; Clarence Page, Chicago Tribune. duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Need To Know [#254H] America By The Numbers with Maria Hinojosa: Clarkston, Georgia In this NTK Election 2012 special, Maria Hinojosa visits one of the country's most surprisingly diverse communities, a home to residents from more than 40 countries who speak more than 60 languages and dialects. Clarkston, Georgia, a town of 7500 people, was 90% white in the 1980s; today, it is less than 14% white. The program looks at how a rising multicultural population may influence American culture and affect the 2012 presidential election. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#137H] Elections for Sale One of the reasons Moyers & Company frequently returns to the theme of money and politics is because it's absolutely necessary to do so. Nothing corrupts our political system more than the ability of the rich and influential to spend limitless amounts of money - often in secret - with the intention of creating preferred political outcomes. And far from being a regulator of campaign finances, our political funding laws - aided by a corporate-friendly Supreme Court and self-interested politicians - only facilitate the process of empowering the few while subjugating the many.
    Few understand the ways money moves in and out of our political system than campaign finance reform advocate Trevor Potter. A former chairman of the Federal Election Commission and founding president of the Campaign Legal Center, Potter was Stephen Colbert's chief advisor when Colbert formed his own super PAC and 501 (c)(4) in a clever effort to expose the potential for chicanery behind each.
    This week, Bill and Potter discuss how American elections are bought and sold, who covers the cost, and how the rest of us pay the price. "I can assure you that if someone is spending millions of dollars to elect the candidate, the candidate knows where that money is coming from. There's nothing illegal about telling them, but the voters aren't going to know that," Potter tells Bill. "We're creating opportunities for corruption and candidates being beholden to specific private interests because of funding, yet there's no disclosure to the rest of us."
    Also on the show, a Bill Moyers Essay on the bags of money that campaigns drop on consultants and TV ads to affect and distort your point of view.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 1:00 pm
    This American Land [#208] Digging for Dinosaurs, Sonoran Desert Protection, "Swamp People" Digging for Dinosaurs: Talk about a special delivery! Co-host Caroline Raville got to witness the recovery of thousands of pounds of dinosaur fossils by helicopter, deep in the Utah desert. Paleontologists from the Bureau of Land Management call Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument one of the best "bone yards" on the planet. Scientists continue to identify new species of dinosaurs and other reptiles in this remote area. Many are 75 million years old!
    Sonoran Desert Protection: There's a quiet beauty in Arizona's Sonoran Desert. A wide range of residents work to make sure wildlife and ancient artifacts here are protected, now and for the future. You'll meet a pastor who's come up with a game for his young parishioners to learn about nature. Local farmers embrace the daily visits of wild animals to their land. Conservationists, and even the U.S. Air Force, realize the need to keep this land safe for future generations.
    "Swamp People": The Okefenokee Swamp is constantly changing, from its river trails to its alligators and beautiful bird populations. Sharon Collins of Georgia Public Broadcasting joins some self-proclaimed "swamp people" who make their living in this National Wildlife Refuge. It is a wetland of international importance, but for anyone who visits, it is simply a captivating place to watch plants and animals.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 1:30 pm
    QUEST [#607H] Black Holes/Stanford's Camera Traps Hunt for black holes with NASA's new space telescope that uses X-ray vision to try and unlock the secrets of these invisible space oddities. Then, find out what's being done about the alarming amount of plastic that is collecting in the Pacific Ocean. And, uncover the secret lives of animals through motion-activated cameras at Stanford's Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve. duration 26:21   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    Miller Center Forums [#1505] Susan Glasser - Looking Toward The 2012 Election Susan Glasser is editor in chief of Foreign Policy, the magazine of global politics, economics, and ideas. A longtime foreign correspondent and editor for the Washington Post, Glasser joined Foreign Policy in 2008 and has been spearheading the magazine's ambitious expansion in print and online at ForeignPolicy.com. During her tenure, the magazine has won numerous awards for its innovative coverage, including two National Magazine Awards, and was recently selected as a finalist for "magazine of the year" by the American Society of Magazine Editors. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 pm
    Not In Our Town: Light in the Darkness In the third program in this strand about communities standing up against hate crimes, the story is set in Patchogue, New York, an ethnically diverse working class village in Suffolk County. In 2008, a series of attacks against Latino residents ended with the killing of 37-year-old Marcelo Lucero, an Ecuadorian immigrant who had lived in the village for 13 years. Seven local high school students arrested for the crime admitted they were "looking for a Mexican" to beat up. Over a two-year period, the film follows Patchogue Mayor Paul Pontieri, a 60-something Italian-American, as he leads a diverse group of residents to confront the anti-immigrant bias in their town and repair the fabric of their community life. The victim's brother, Joselo Lucero, and other Latino residents of Patchogue become leading voices for immigrants while working within the community to address local divisions. Faith leaders mobilize their congregations, and educators and school administrators develop anti-bias programs. The strife in this town mirrors some of the most complex and hotly debated topics in our country today. But the film provides a message of hope as civic leaders, students, quilting grandmothers, active librarians and store owners confront the crime and take action to repair a culture that has been torn apart by bigotry and fear. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 4:00 pm
    Truly CA: Our State, Our Stories [#404] Fruits of War Fruits of War explores a devastating cycle of violence that has plagued El Salvador for over 30 years. The film follows 4 reformed gang members - Bullet, Rebel, Weazel, and Duke - who came to the United States as child refugees from El Salvador's bloody civil war, settled in Los Angeles' tough east side, and eventually got involved in street gangs. In an effort to suppress an epidemic of gang violence, the US began an aggressive policy of deporting undocumented gang members with felony records. When these 4 men arrive back in El Salvador, they discover a country ravaged by war, and facing a new wave of violence as the LA street gangs take root in their homeland. The government, with support from the US, begins a brutal crackdown on the gangs, and these 4 men find themselves in the middle of a conflict eerily similar to the civil war - pitting the army and police against thousands of El Salvador's poorest residents, now members of the gangs. As they come to terms with their two countries' violent histories, these former gang members redirect their lives towards helping young people deal with this legacy. By Josiah Hooper. duration 56:25   STEREO TVG
  • 5:00 pm
    Independent Lens [#1323] Precious Knowledge When a highly successful Mexican American Studies program at Tucson High School comes under fire for teaching ethnic chauvinism, teachers and students fight back. This modern civil rights struggle is born at the epicenter of the immigration debate in the age of identity politics. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3039] The Real Romney Revealed?; Afghan Insider Attacks Up; Poll Bounce. Tim Carney, The Washington Examiner; Eleanor Clift, Newsweek; Mort Zuckerman, US News & World Report; Clarence Page, Chicago Tribune. duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Washington Week [#5212H] The political fallout continues following the release of a secretly recorded tape where Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney appears to disparage Americans who receive government assistance. Mr. Romney said that the 47% of Americans who support President Barack Obama think the government should take care of them and that many believe they are "victims." Romney added, "'I'll never convince them that they should take personal responsibility and care for their lives.' While he said he regretted his choice of words, Romney went on to say that he knew those "dependent on government" would not vote for him in November.
    In 2008 Barack Obama was also secretly recorded at a private fundraising event. Then candidate-Obama said rural voters in Pennsylvania and other small towns "cling to their guns or religion." The comments were politically embarrassing but happened during the heated primary race against Hillary Clinton not the general election.
    Several new polls show President Obama has a slight edge over Romney among likely voters and a moderate lead in a number of key swing states. But could the candidates' performances at the upcoming presidential debates change the course of the race? Joining Gwen Ifill with insights and analysis of the race for the White House: John Dickerson of Slate Magazine and CBS News, Gloria Borger of CNN, John Harwood of CNBC and The New York Times, and Sam Youngman of Reuters.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 pm
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2345H] September 21, 2012 PROP. 32 - Proposition 32 on the November ballot would prohibit employee paycheck deductions from being used for political purposes. Opponents of the ban, including the California Teachers Union, say it is an unfair attempt to restrict their influence, while not placing limitations on spending by wealthy business interests or individuals.
    SAN JOSE CRIME - San Jose, long one of the safest large cities in California, has recently experienced a spike in crime. This week, Police Chief Chris Moore announced his unexpected resignation in January, after two years on the job.
    PUBLIC POWER FOR SAN FRANCISCO - The San Francisco Board of Supervisors has given approval to pave the way for clean public power in San Francisco. Residents would be automatically enrolled in the plan and charged a higher rate than for PG&E, unless they opt out. A similar system is currently in place in Marin County.
    HETCH HETCHY BALLOT MEASURE - If approved by San Francisco voters, Measure F would begin a planning phase for draining and restoring the Hetch Hetchy Reservoir to park land. It is supported by the Sierra Club and other environmental groups. Opponents, including San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee and Senators Boxer and Feinstein, say it is a necessary water source and that the region cannot afford the costs.
    Guests: John Myers, KXTV; Robert Solanga, San Jose Mercury News; Tom Vacar, KTVU; and Paul Rogers, San Jose Mercury News.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:30 pm
    QUEST [#607H] Black Holes/Stanford's Camera Traps Hunt for black holes with NASA's new space telescope that uses X-ray vision to try and unlock the secrets of these invisible space oddities. Then, find out what's being done about the alarming amount of plastic that is collecting in the Pacific Ocean. And, uncover the secret lives of animals through motion-activated cameras at Stanford's Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve. duration 26:21   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1105] Globe Trekker Food Hour: Israel & The Palestinian Territories Angela May discovers the diverse and rich food traditions of Israel, with visits to Jaffa, Jerusalem, the coastal city of Acca and the hills of Judea. In the second half of this special, chef Bobby Chinn investigates whether or not there is an authentic Palestinian cuisine as he explores Jerusalem, Jericho, Bethlehem and Ramallah. duration 55:22   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 9:00 pm
    Nature [#2603H] American Eagle Unique to North America, the bald eagle is the continent's most recognizable aerial predator, with a shocking white head, electric yellow beak and penetrating eyes. In the 1960s, this symbol of the United States became an emblem of environmental degradation as the pesticide DDT and other human pressures brought it to the brink of extinction. Following their protection as an endangered species, bald eagles have come roaring back. Photographed by Emmy-winning cinematographer Neil Rettig, this film focuses on the drama of the nest. Even in the best of times, it's a surprisingly tough struggle to maintain a one-ton home and raise chicks until they can hunt on their own. duration 55:16   SRND51 TVPG
  • 10:00 pm
    Nova [#3802#] Making Stuff Stronger From carbon nanotubes to artificial skin, our world is poised at the frontier of a revolution in materials science as far-reaching as the biotech breakthroughs of the last two decades. This series explores how materials changed history and are shaping the future, ranging from cost-effective fuel cells and solar panels to quantum computers and ultra-light automobiles. The New York Times' technology correspondent and best-selling author David Pogue brings his trademark goofball humor and techie zeal to this exploration of the future of "stuff." Each episode explores the talent, luck and determination that can turn a wild idea into a cutting-edge material or high-tech breakthrough.
    This episode: What is the strongest material in the world? Is it iron? Are Kevlar and carbon nanotubes the way of the future, or will the powerful properties discovered in natural spider silk one day replace steel? Nova begins the ambitious four-hour program with a quest for the world's strongest stuff. Host David Pogue helps viewers understand what defines strength, examining everything from mollusks to a toucan's beak and testing the world's strongest materials. Pogue travels from the deck of a US naval aircraft carrier to a demolition derby to the country's top research labs to check in with the experts who are re-engineering what nature has given us to create the next generation of strong "stuff."
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 11:00 pm
    Nova [#3803H] Making Stuff Smaller How small can we go? Could we one day have robots taking "fantastic voyages" in our bodies to kill rogue cells? The triumphs of tiny are seen all around us in the Information Age: transistors, microchips, laptops, cell phones. Now, David Pogue takes Nova viewers to an even smaller world in Making Stuff Smaller, examining the latest in high-powered nano-circuits and microrobots that may one day hold the key to saving lives and creating materials from the ground up, atom by atom. Pogue explores the star materials of small applications, including silicon, the stuff of computer chips, and carbon, the element now being manipulated at the atomic level to produce future technology. "Smaller" and more portable stuff has already revolutionized the way we live. The nanotechnology to come could change the face of medicine, with intelligent pills that know what medicine to release into the body and treat patients from the "inside" based on changing needs; robots that repair damaged body parts; and more. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 12:00 am
    Richard Bangs' Adventures with Purpose Hong Kong: Quest for the Dragon Adventurer Richard Bangs ventures into the heart of Hong Kong to discover what forces drive a city in which the spiritual concept of chi and the worldly concept of wealth coexist. Bangs begins by taking in one of the most dazzling festivals on earth, Chinese New Year. Then, he wanders beneath the skyscrapers of Central District, meanders down the alleys of Western District and ferries across the harbor to Kowloon. Later, he sail the "dragon-infested" waters to the Geopark, an ecological preserve, before making his way to Lantau Island, and finally north, to the villages of the New Territories. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
Saturday, September 22, 2012

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TV Technical Issues

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    TV Technical Issues
    • Mon 11/03/14: Work on KQED Plus tower (DT54)

      Another station needs to do maintenance on its equipment on the tower on Monument Peak, requiring that we switch our DT54 Over the Air signal from the main antenna to the auxiliary when the work starts, then back to the main antenna at the conclusion. These switches should cause momentary outages only, and most receivers […]

    • Wed 10/15 morning: KQED Plus (KQEH) Over the Air signal down

      UPDATE: This problem has been resolved, and the OTA signal for the DT54 channels restored. (DT54.1 through 54.5) KQED Plus’ Over the Air transmission is currently off air via our KQEH transmitter on Monument Peak northeast of San Jose. Technicians are working on the problem. No current estimate regarding how long this will exist. We […]

    • KQET (DT25) Over the Air: Wed 8/27

      We are aware of the break-up issues for our DT25 Over the Air signal in the Monterey/Salinas area. This will also affect viewers of any cable or satellite signal provider using that transmitter as their source. Engineers are working on the problem.

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

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