Donate

TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Saturday, April 28, 2012

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, April 28, 2012
  • 12:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#31215Z] The economy squeezed along in the first quarter, but corporate earnings are firing on all cylinders. New York Correspondent Erika Miller looks at what's behind the disconnect. From Apple to Amazon, an update on earnings season. New York Correspondent Suzanne Pratt reports. A bill to freeze rates on student loans makes it past the house, but why is the White House threatening to veto? Washington Correspondent Sylvia Hall reports. Meet the man who coined the term "crowdsourcing." Jeff Howe talks to NBR Anchor Susie Gharib about why the internet is driving the future of business. Strong earnings will push stocks higher, but forget about gold. That's what Forecasts & Strategies' Mark Skousen is telling Anchor Tom Hudson. He's this week's Market Monitor guest. Why it's important to be able to look at something with a different point of view. Author and Educator Lou Heckler explains why in "Lou's Been Thinking." duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 12:30 am
    BBC Newsnight [#17118] duration 28:03   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10316H] Dealing With Student Debt * Global Economic Woes * New Insurance Plans For The Young * Shields & Brooks * Poets With Public Roles duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 2:00 am
    Charlie Rose [#18090] (original broadcast date: 04/27/12)
    * 'New Galleries for the Art of the Arab Lands, Turkey, Iran, Central Asia and Later South Asia' at The Metropolitan Museum of Art with Navina Haidar and Sheila Canby
    * Site and Sound: The Architecture and Acoustics of New Opera Houses and Concert Halls with Daniel Libeskind, Michael Kaiser, Renee Fleming & Victoria Newhouse
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:00 am
    BBC World News [#119] duration 28:03   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2590Z] Tavis talks with artist-producer-songwriter Steve Tyrell about his newest CD "I'll Take Romance". The Grammy winner highlights his career and his R&B background and reflects on developing his own sound as an artist. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10316H] Dealing With Student Debt * Global Economic Woes * New Insurance Plans For The Young * Shields & Brooks * Poets With Public Roles duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:00 am
    Democracy Now! [#1195] duration 59:00   TVRE
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    Global 3000 [#416] A Hazardous South African Legacy: Radioactive Mine Lithium Mining in Bolivia's Salt Flats - With its vast reserves of lithium, Bolivia has a very valuable natural resource. Mining it with as little foreign involvement as possible would keep the profits and benefits in Bolivia. The lithium lies within a crust of salt, three and a half thousand meters up in the Andes. South Africa: Contaminated water from old mines - Johannesburg is facing a disaster: Water full of radioactive particles and heavy metals is spilling out of six thousand old mine shafts. Environmental activists have been trying to get the government to take action for more than a decade. They say urgent measures are needed. Mustard Power in India - In Rajasthan, one of India's poorest states, mustard plants that used to be burned are now a source of income for many farming families. They sell the plants to a biomass power plant. To generate the same amount of power using coal would mean 36,000 more tons of carbon-dioxide emissions each year. The biomass plant generates eco-friendly electricity. And when it's done, the ash is compacted into bricks, which are then used as fertilizer for the mustard fields. Ghana - Prosperity through cassava - Cassava is a major staple in Ghana. It is a food crop and can also be used to make bioplastic. The problem is that cassava goes off quickly once it is harvested. Josma is a small company that makes cassava flour. With help from the International Fund for Agricultural Development, Josma has acquired new machines and hired new staff. The entire region should benefit as a result. duration 26:10   STEREO
  • 6:30 am
    European Journal [#3016] Reality In Spain - 100 Evictions A Day SPAIN: FAMILIES AND FORECLOSURES - Evictions have become a tragic everyday occurrence in Spain. The government has devised a code of conduct to ensure that banks take extreme hardship into consideration in their decisions. Those decisions will be at the banks' own discretion, however. While the code was a well-meaning gesture on the part of the government, it has been ineffective; every day over 100 families have to move out of their homes because they can no longer keep up with mortgage payments. In many cases, they literally end up on the street. People are now joining forces to combat this phenomenon.
    SWITZERLAND: RESCUERS IN DISTRESS - They want to save lives yet end up the victims of violence themselves. Paramedics in Zurich live dangerously. Now they want to be equipped with knife-proof vests. Paramedics have to put up with a lot: they're abused, spat on beaten up, and sometimes even threatened with knives.
    GREECE: A NEW WIND BLOWING - The country's financial situation remains a precarious one. Substantial progress has been made in some areas, however; corrupt officials now face serious consequences for taking bribes. Eager to get involved, a hotel owner and an olive oil supplier applied for European Union funding assigned to the regeneration of poorer regions.
    RUSSIA: THE BURANOVO GRANNIES - The Buranovo Grannies are a long-standing favorite in Russia. The folk group is made up of six elderly women from a village in the Ural Mountains, shaking a leg to a disco beat. The group is to represent Russia at the Eurovision song contest in Baku this year. The women, all over 70 and some past 80, beat other acts hands down in the qualifiers.
    duration 26:10   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1535Z] FAITH GROUPS AND IMMIGRATION: The Supreme Court is weighing the legal challenge to Arizona's strict immigration law, and religious groups opposed to the law are appealing to language throughout the scriptures "to take care of the stranger," says Catholic News Service staff writer Patricia Zapor.
    CONVERSATIONS BEFORE DYING: Hospice chaplain Kerry Egan says the most important gift she offers to the dying patients she ministers to is "deeply listening to what it is they're saying." We visit some of her hospice patients in New Bedford, Massachusetts.
    RABBI ADIN STEINSALTZ: "The idea of the Talmud is that you are allowed to ask questions about everything," says Rabbi Adin Steinsaltz, who calls the Talmud "the central pillar of Jewish culture" and "a vast book encouraging you to ask questions. " Translating the Talmud into modern Hebrew and English has been his life's work.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#116H] Big Money, Big Media, Big Trouble Big money and big media have coupled to create a 'Disney World' of democracy in which TV shows, televised debates, even news coverage is being dumbed down, just as the volume is being turned up. The result is a public certainly more entertained, but less informed and personally involved than they should be, says Marty Kaplan, director of USC's Norman Lear Center and an entertainment industry veteran. This weekend, Bill Moyers talks with Kaplan about how taking news out of the journalism box and placing it in the entertainment box is hurting democracy and allowing special interest groups to manipulate the system.
    "It's all about combat. If every political issue is [represented by] combat between two polarized sides, then you get great television because people are throwing food at each other," Kaplan tells Moyers. "And you have an audience that hasn't a clue at the end of the story, which is why you'll hear, 'Well, we'll have to leave it there.' The problem is that there's not that much information out there if you're an ordinary citizen. You can ferret it out, but it ought not be like that in a democracy," Kaplan says. "Education and journalism were supposed to, according to our founders, inform our public and make democracy work."
    Later on the show, Bill talks about Florida Rep. Allen West and shocking modern-day McCarthyism. Wasn't this lesson already learned?
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2402] duration 26:46   TVRE
  • 9:00 am
    Washington Week [#5144H] * Mitt Romney targeted President Barack Obama in his victory speech on Tuesday after sweeping 5 state primaries and reinforcing his position as the presumptive Republican presidential nominee. The former Massachusetts governor accused the president of failing to deliver on his promises of "hope and change" and vowed to win the White House in November. John Dickerson of Slate Magazine and CBS News will report on how Romney is shifting his attention to finding a presidential running mate and consolidating the party's conservative base ahead of the GOP nominating convention in August.
    * President Obama will officially kick off his re-election campaign next week with rallies in the battleground states of Ohio and Virginia. He spent this week visiting colleges in the battleground states of North Carolina, Colorado and Iowa discussing federal financial aid. At each stop he urged Congress to pass legislation to extend the current 3.4% interest rate on federal student loans that is set to expire July 1. Given the focus on young voters this week, Alexis Simendinger of RealClearPolitics.com will examine the efforts by both parties to rally the youth vote.
    * The Supreme Court heard oral arguments both for and against Arizona's controversial immigration law this week. Under the statute Arizona police are required to check on the immigration status of anyone they stop or detain who they suspect may be in the country illegally. The law also makes it a crime for any illegal immigrants to work or seek employment. Pete Williams of NBC News will explain why the case is likely to have sweeping legal and political implications regardless of which way the high court rules.
    * Ahead of next week's one-year anniversary of Osama bin Laden's death, James Kitfield of National Journal will report on how the Obama administration continues to find the right balance between fighting terrorism and protecting civil liberties.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:30 am
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2327H] April 27, 2012 NEWS PANEL: Mad Cow Disease / Prison Reform / Doyle Drive Closure < br />* Concerns over food safety have been raised by the discovery of mad cow disease in Tulare County, California. USDA officials assure consumers the food chain is safe while they continue to investigate whether any other animals are infected.
    * The California Department of Corrections rolled out a plan this week that would cut prison spending by billions of dollars, end federal court oversight and improve operation of the nation's largest state prison system. The changes are largely due to realignment, a program which redirects low-level offenders to local jails.
    * This weekend's closure and demolition of the seismically unsafe Doyle Drive approach to the Golden Gate Bridge is expected to snarl traffic in and around San Francisco. Starting Monday, drivers will use a temporary bypass, traveling through a newly constructed tunnel as workers begin the next phase of the $1.1 billion Presidio Parkway.
    Guests: Paul Rogers, San Jose Mercury News; Michael Montgomery, KQED News and The Center for Investigative Reporting; and Michael Cabanatuan, San Francisco Chronicle.
    ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT OF TECHNOLOGY MANUFACTURING IN CHINA - Goldman Environmental Prize winner Ma Jun, founder of the Institute of Public and Environmental Affairs in Beijing, tells Laura Sydell, NPR Digital Culture Correspondent, how his organization works with multinational companies to reduce their environmental footprint in China.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:00 am
    BBC Newsnight [#17118] duration 28:03   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2107H] WOMEN'S VOTE: This week low rate student loans, renewal of VAWA and the issue of Mitt Romney's running mate dominated the presidential race with both candidates trying to capture the women's vote.
    FACEBOOK FACES PROTESTS: Women's rights activists protest outside Facebook's offices against the all-male board. Protestors delivered a petition with 53,000 signatures demanding women be placed on the board before the private company goes public.
    IMMIGRATION & EDUCATION: An in-depth look at the costs and challenges of educating the immigrant population and children who don't speak English.
    Panelists: Conservative Commentator Tara Setmayer; Republican Pollster Kellyanne Conway; Center for Immigration Studies' Jessica Vaughan; The Huffington Post's Amanda Terkel; Political Commentator Lara Brown.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3018] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    John McLaughlin's One on One [#2748] duration 27:30   TVG
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#116H] Big Money, Big Media, Big Trouble Big money and big media have coupled to create a 'Disney World' of democracy in which TV shows, televised debates, even news coverage is being dumbed down, just as the volume is being turned up. The result is a public certainly more entertained, but less informed and personally involved than they should be, says Marty Kaplan, director of USC's Norman Lear Center and an entertainment industry veteran. This weekend, Bill Moyers talks with Kaplan about how taking news out of the journalism box and placing it in the entertainment box is hurting democracy and allowing special interest groups to manipulate the system.
    "It's all about combat. If every political issue is [represented by] combat between two polarized sides, then you get great television because people are throwing food at each other," Kaplan tells Moyers. "And you have an audience that hasn't a clue at the end of the story, which is why you'll hear, 'Well, we'll have to leave it there.' The problem is that there's not that much information out there if you're an ordinary citizen. You can ferret it out, but it ought not be like that in a democracy," Kaplan says. "Education and journalism were supposed to, according to our founders, inform our public and make democracy work."
    Later on the show, Bill talks about Florida Rep. Allen West and shocking modern-day McCarthyism. Wasn't this lesson already learned?
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 1:00 pm
    Natural Heroes [#508] Brower Youth Awards 2010 The Brower Youth Awards were established to honor legendary environmental activist, David R. Brower and to call forth a new generation of leaders. From Alaska, to Puerto Rico, to the Bronx; get to know the young winners of the 2010 Brower Youth Awards, and learn about their many inspiring accomplishments! duration 26:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 1:30 pm
    QUEST [#601H] Amateur Rocketeers/Edible Insects Meet amateur rocket builders who are striving to reach the edge of space with their home-made rockets.Then get a different perspective on nature with photographer Simon Christen who shares his passion for observing the environment through time-lapse photography. Finally, take a bite into the latest food craze and cook with bug-eating enthusiasts who believe that insects are a smarter alternative to more traditional kinds of meat. duration 26:21   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    Miller Center Forums [#1304] Michelle Goldberg - The Global Battle Over Reproductive Rights Michelle Goldberg is a journalist and author based in Brooklyn, New York. Her most recent book is "The Means of Reproduction: Sex, Power and the Future of the World" and won last year's J. Anthony Lukas Work in Progress Award. Researched in four continents, "The Means of Reproduction" tells the story of the global battle for reproductive rights, and argues that the oppression of women is the great human rights issue of our time. Goldberg is also the author of the "New York Times" bestseller "Kingdom Coming: The Rise of Christian Nationalism. " She is a columnist for "The Daily Beast," and her work has appeared in the "New Republic," the "American Prospect," "The Nation," "Glamour," "The Los Angeles Times" and many other publications. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 pm
    Energy Quest USA - Earth: The Operators' Manual This program presents five examples of American states and cities tapping new sources of energy and implementing policies to promote sustainability - Alaska, Kansas, Baltimore Maryland, Fort Worth Texas, and Portland Oregon. Host Richard Alley offers stories about America's past use of wood and whales as sources of energy, the promise of more efficient lighting, and how to achieve a science-based national consensus on smart choices about energy and climate. On-camera comments also come from energy expert Daniel Yergin, author of "The Quest"; RPI President and former head of the NRC,Shirley Jackson; utility CEO David Crane, Sen. Lisa Murkowski, Congressman Earl Blumenauer, and a lively case of characters. duration 56:46   SRND51 TVG
  • 4:00 pm
    Prohibition [#103H] A Nation of Hypocrites Support for Prohibition diminishes in the mid-1920s as the playfulness of sneaking around for a drink gives way to disenchantment with its glaring unintended consequences. By criminalizing one of the nation's largest industries, the law has given savvy gangsters a way to make huge profits, and as they grow in power, rival outfits wreak havoc in cities across the country. The burgeoning tabloid newspaper industry fans the frenzy with sensational headlines and front-page photographs of murder scenes, while Al Capone holds press conferences and signs autographs. The wealthy Pauline Sabin begins publicly decrying that Prohibition has divided the nation into "wets, drys, and hypocrites." Nearly a century before, women had hoped Prohibition would make the country a safer place for their children. But by the late 1920s many American women believe that the "Noble Experiment" has failed. Sabin unifies women of all classes, refuting the notion that all women support Prohibition and denouncing the law itself as the greatest threat to their families. Sabin and others argue that repeal will bring in tax revenue and provide desperately needed jobs. After the election of Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1932, Congress easily passes the 21st Amendment, which repeals the 18th, and the states quickly ratify it. In December of 1933, Americans can legally buy a drink for the first time in 13 years. (Part 3 of 3) duration 1:46:42   SRND51 TVPG-L (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3018] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Washington Week [#5144H] * Mitt Romney targeted President Barack Obama in his victory speech on Tuesday after sweeping 5 state primaries and reinforcing his position as the presumptive Republican presidential nominee. The former Massachusetts governor accused the president of failing to deliver on his promises of "hope and change" and vowed to win the White House in November. John Dickerson of Slate Magazine and CBS News will report on how Romney is shifting his attention to finding a presidential running mate and consolidating the party's conservative base ahead of the GOP nominating convention in August.
    * President Obama will officially kick off his re-election campaign next week with rallies in the battleground states of Ohio and Virginia. He spent this week visiting colleges in the battleground states of North Carolina, Colorado and Iowa discussing federal financial aid. At each stop he urged Congress to pass legislation to extend the current 3.4% interest rate on federal student loans that is set to expire July 1. Given the focus on young voters this week, Alexis Simendinger of RealClearPolitics.com will examine the efforts by both parties to rally the youth vote.
    * The Supreme Court heard oral arguments both for and against Arizona's controversial immigration law this week. Under the statute Arizona police are required to check on the immigration status of anyone they stop or detain who they suspect may be in the country illegally. The law also makes it a crime for any illegal immigrants to work or seek employment. Pete Williams of NBC News will explain why the case is likely to have sweeping legal and political implications regardless of which way the high court rules.
    * Ahead of next week's one-year anniversary of Osama bin Laden's death, James Kitfield of National Journal will report on how the Obama administration continues to find the right balance between fighting terrorism and protecting civil liberties.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 pm
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2327H] April 27, 2012 NEWS PANEL: Mad Cow Disease / Prison Reform / Doyle Drive Closure < br />* Concerns over food safety have been raised by the discovery of mad cow disease in Tulare County, California. USDA officials assure consumers the food chain is safe while they continue to investigate whether any other animals are infected.
    * The California Department of Corrections rolled out a plan this week that would cut prison spending by billions of dollars, end federal court oversight and improve operation of the nation's largest state prison system. The changes are largely due to realignment, a program which redirects low-level offenders to local jails.
    * This weekend's closure and demolition of the seismically unsafe Doyle Drive approach to the Golden Gate Bridge is expected to snarl traffic in and around San Francisco. Starting Monday, drivers will use a temporary bypass, traveling through a newly constructed tunnel as workers begin the next phase of the $1.1 billion Presidio Parkway.
    Guests: Paul Rogers, San Jose Mercury News; Michael Montgomery, KQED News and The Center for Investigative Reporting; and Michael Cabanatuan, San Francisco Chronicle.
    ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT OF TECHNOLOGY MANUFACTURING IN CHINA - Goldman Environmental Prize winner Ma Jun, founder of the Institute of Public and Environmental Affairs in Beijing, tells Laura Sydell, NPR Digital Culture Correspondent, how his organization works with multinational companies to reduce their environmental footprint in China.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:30 pm
    QUEST [#601H] Amateur Rocketeers/Edible Insects Meet amateur rocket builders who are striving to reach the edge of space with their home-made rockets.Then get a different perspective on nature with photographer Simon Christen who shares his passion for observing the environment through time-lapse photography. Finally, take a bite into the latest food craze and cook with bug-eating enthusiasts who believe that insects are a smarter alternative to more traditional kinds of meat. duration 26:21   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1104] Caribbean Island: St. Lucia, Martinique & Montserrat Zoe Palmer visits the spectacularly beautiful islands of St Lucia, Martinique and Montserrat. Surrounded by stunning rainforests, mountains and volcanoes with a hybrid of English, African and French heritage, these islands deserve their reputation as one of the top vacation spots in the world. duration 56:38   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 9:00 pm
    Nature [#2405Z] Rhinoceros Millions of rhinos once roamed the Earth. There were hundreds of species of all shapes and sizes. But today, the rhinoceros is one of the planet's rarest animals, with three of its species on the brink of extinction. The program follows a team of experts who are working to protect rhinos from poachers -- relocating them to better habitats and breeding them in captivity. duration 55:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 10:00 pm
    Nova [#3907H] Secrets of the Sun It contains 99.9% of all the matter in our solar system and sheds hot plasma at nearly a million miles an hour. The temperature at its core is a staggering 27 million degrees Fahrenheit. It convulses, it blazes, it sings. You know it as the sun. Scientists know it as one of the most amazing physics laboratories in the universe. Now, with the help of new spacecraft and Earth-based telescopes, scientists are seeing the Sun as they never have before and even re-creating what happens at the very center of the Sun in labs here on Earth. Their work will help us understand aspects of the sun that have puzzled scientists for decades. But more critically, it may help us predict and track solar storms that have the power to zap our power grid, shut down telecommunications, and ground global air travel for days, weeks, or even longer. Such storms have happened before-but never in the modern era of satellite communication. Thid episode reveals a bright new dawn in our understanding of our nearest star-one that might help keep our planet from going dark. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 11:00 pm
    America Revealed [#103] Electric Nation Our modern electric power grid has been called the biggest and most complex machine in the world -- delivering electricity to over 300 million Americans over 200,000 miles of high tension transmission lines. But even though the grid touches almost every aspect of our lives, it's a system we know very little about. In this episode, Yul Kwon will travel around the country to understand its intricacies, its vulnerabilities and the remarkable ingenuity required to keep the electricity on every day of the year. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:00 am
    Globe Trekker [#1001] Antarctica Zay Harding's epic adventure in Antarctica begins with sea kayaking and penguin watching in Paradise Harbor, sails to historic Port Lockrov where he observes the work of Ukrainian biologists, unsuccessfully attempts to climb the treacherous Mount Scott, meets with U.S. scientists at Palmer station as he learns about the effects of global warming and the plight of the Adelie penguin and finally crosses the perilous Drake Passage on his way back to the South American mainland. duration 57:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
Saturday, April 28, 2012

Navigate By Date

Calendar is loading...
Become a KQED sponsor

TV Technical Issues

TV
    TV Technical Issues
    • KQED DT9s Over the Air: beginning Wed 7/09

      (DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3) The PSIP Info part of our Over the Air (OTA) signal for KQED DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3 dropped out of our overall signal early Wednesday 7/09. Once PSIP was restored most OTA receivers moved our signal back to the correct channel locations. However, for some viewers, it appears as if they have lost […]

    • KQED FM 88.1 translator off air Tues 6/03

      The Martinez translator for KQED-FM will be off the air all day Tuesday June 3rd. We are rebuilding the 25 year old site with all new antennas and cabling. This should only affect people listening on 88.1MHz in the Martinez/Benicia area.

    • KQET planned overnight outage: early Tues 5/13

      (DT25.1, 25.2, 25.3) KQET’s Over The Air (OTA) signal will shut down late May 12/early Tues 5/13 shortly after midnight to allow for extensive electrical maintenance work at the transmitter. Engineers will do their best to complete the work by 6am Tuesday morning. This will affect OTA viewers of the DT25 channels, and signal providers […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Comcast 9 and 709
Digital 9.1, 54.2 or 25.1

All widescreen and HD programs

KQED Plus

Channel 54
Comcast 10 and 710
Digital 9.2, 54.1 or 25.2

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life
Comcast 189
Digital 54.3

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Comcast 190
Digital 9.3

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Comcast 191 & 621
Digital 54.5 or 25.3

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Comcast 192
Digital 54.4

Quality children's programming parents love too