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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Sunday, October 25, 2009

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Sunday, October 25, 2009
  • 12:00 am
    Globe Trekker [#813] Pakistan Neil Gibson begins his trip in Karachi, Pakistan's most bustling metropolis. He takes a horse and cart to the Saddar Bazaar, the city's main shopping area, and pays a visit to one of Karachi's leprosy hospitals. Neil journeys by train to Multan, the ancient valley civilization of the Multan, where he has his fortune told by a bird, stuffs his turban with onions and rides by camelback to the spectacular Derawar Fort in the Cholistan desert. He visits the Khyber Pass, the exotic valley of Chitral (birthplace of polo) and stays with the Kalash people, believed to have descended from Alexander the Great. Neil then takes a three-day trek through the Hunza Valley, crossing two incredible glaciers and ending with a view from the magnificent Rush Peak. duration 56:18   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 1:00 am
    QUEST [#309H] Wastewater Woes/Eclipse Chasers QUEST investigates the causes of frequent sewage spills into San Francisco Bay. And journey with the eclipse chasers - adventurers who travel the world to document solar eclipses. duration 26:18   STEREO TVG
  • 1:30 am
    Wild Chronicles [#412] Looking Back * News from Nature - Following the surprising discovery of a fossil in a limestone countertop in Italy, National Geographic researchers search for the remains of the first mammals to migrate from Eurasia to Africa. Evidence suggests floods of Asian animals entered Africa through Egypt when the two continents were joined 20 million years ago and evolved over millions of years to become some of today's iconic African animals, including zebras, rhinoceroses, wildebeests and giraffes.
    * Stories from the Wild - Using satellite transmitters, researchers track the daily travels of long-tailed ducks wintering along Nantucket's shores to determine if building a wind farm in Nantucket Sound is a threat to the ducks' habitat. While satellite imagery shows the ducks roost away from the proposed wind farm location, conservationists continue to monitor the birds to learn more about their daily journeys and migratory patterns.
    * Adventure and Exploration - Nat Geo grantee Jon Waterman attempts to travel the Colorado River's almost 1500 miles from start to finish. But the river, siphoned off for industrial use throughout the United States, vanishes underground in Mexico, turning a once lush wetland into a dry wasteland. Forced to walk the rest of the way, Waterman hopes his journey will inspire people to conserve water and truly appreciate the amazing resource.
    * Conservation News - WC travels to Cairo, Egypt where Nat Geo Emerging Explorer Thomas Taha Culhane is helping lower-income Egyptians build solar-powered rooftop water heaters out of recycled trash. Utilizing Egypt's abundant sunshine, the solar heaters improve the quality of life and sanitation, while cutting down on potential energy costs. Culhane hopes the water heater project will lead to other low-tech innovations using recycled materials.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 am
    Globe Trekker [#823] Panama & Colombia Megan McCormick takes a trip through Colombia and Panama, two countries that are refreshingly untouched by mass tourism. In Panama City, Megan tries different Panama hats, which she learns are really from Ecuador but were misnamed as far back as the1850s when Americans were building the railroad during the Gold Rush. She visits the Panama Canal, the crucial byway that generates $1 billion a year for the Panamanian economy. In Colombia, Megan finds herself witness to a point-blank shooting. Undeterred, she decides to learn more about the country's crime-ridden history. She stops by Bogota's police museum to see an exhibition of the infamous drug dealer Pablo Escobar, and then visits the Caribbean coast and the beautiful historic city of Cartagena, where she learns about the city's Spanish colonial past and listens to some of Colombia's most popular rhythms, Vallenato. duration 56:27   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 3:00 am
    Nature [#2405] Rhinoceros Millions of rhinos once roamed the Earth. There were hundreds of species of all shapes and sizes. But today, the rhinoceros is one of the planet's rarest animals, with three of its species on the brink of extinction. The program follows a team of experts who are working to protect rhinos from poachers -- relocating them to better habitats and breeding them in captivity. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 4:00 am
    Nova [#3616H] Lizard Kings They look like dragons. Armed with sharp teeth, tearing claws and a whip-like tail, these fearsome creatures are not only powerful, they're also smart. Top predators with intelligence, who learn as they hunt, and who use their brain to track down prey, no matter what. Sounds like these cunning hunters should be a big-brained mammal, but these creatures are reptiles, members of a family that evolved when the dinosaurs roamed the earth. They are the largest lizards still walking the planet, the monitor lizards -- the Lizard Kings. duration 55:21   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 5:00 am
    Warplane [#102] Air Force to Air Power Part 2 examines the innovative air technologies of World War II and the creation of national air forces. The invention of radar and the birth of the fighter ace made airplanes a vital part in wartime tactics. Evolving from their roles as spotters, reconnaissance planes transformed into bombers and fighters became capable of mass destruction. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2103] October 23, 2009 BUSINESS ETHICS - Our panel discusses the role of ethics in business by examining Attorney General Brown's lawsuit against State Street Bank and Trust for alleged fraud against CalPERS and CalSTRS, and the Galleon Group hedge fund insider-trading scandal unfolding in Silicon Valley. Guests: Andrew Ross, Business Columnist, San Francisco Chronicle, Stu Woo, Reporter, Wall Street Journal, Sally Baack, Professor, College of Business, San Francisco State University.
    LOCAL AUTHOR'S VISIT TO AFGHANISTAN - Solomon, author and Director of the Institute for Public Accuracy, visited Kabul a week after Afghanistan's disputed presidential election in August. Since then, a United Nations investigation found widespread fraud and a runoff election is scheduled for November 7th. Solomon shares his observations and discusses the debate over the upcoming election and the Obama administration's imminent decision on whether to send more US troops.
    SEBASTIAO SALGADO - The exhibition "Then and Now" at the David Brower Center in Berkeley features work by acclaimed photographer Sebastiao Salgado. Salgado is known for images that reveal the human condition - from laborers in Latin America to refugees from war and famine in Africa and elsewhere. In the tradition of social documentary photography, he often makes his work available to social change organizations, such as Doctors without Borders, Amnesty International, and UNICEF. Produced by SPARK for This Week in Northern California.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 am
    Now on PBS [#543] Imagine you lived in a world of water. Your home is 2 feet under. You wade through it, cook on it, and sleep above it. This is the reality for hundreds of thousands of people around the world, coastal populations on the front lines of climate change. Only weeks before world leaders meet in Copenhagen to discuss climate change, Maria Hinojosa travels to Bangladesh to examine some innovative solutions - from floating schools to rice that can "hold its breath" underwater - being implemented in a country where entire communities are inundated by water, battered by cyclones, and flooded from their homes.
    The Denmark conference can't come soon enough. Scientists project global seas will flood 20% of Bangladesh by 2030, stranding some 35 million climate refugees. Some are proposing that industrial nations who contribute to global warming should open their doors to displaced Bangladeshis. Is a coastal catastrophe approaching, and what should we be doing about it?
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 am
    Latin View [#507] Latino College Preparation Despite a huge increase in enrollment over the last ten years, Latinos continue to lag behind other groups in college graduation. Sherri and her guests explore Latino college preparation, financial issues and resources, and solutions to higher college graduation rates.
    Guests: Jim Chavez - Executive Director of the Latin American Educational Foundation; Marta Mata - College Preparation Advisor with Educational Talent Search, a federal program funded by the US Department of Education; Arturo Aldama - Ethnic Studies Professor at the University of Colorado at Boulder.
    duration 26:39   STEREO TVG
  • 7:30 am
    Global 3000 [#117] A Coral Forester in Fiji: The Fiji Islands are some 2000 kilometers north of New Zealand and a favorite destination for diving enthusiasts. But the sparkling underwater world there is threatened. Climate change and rising sea levels are causing the reefs to die off more quickly than expected. A marine researcher has come up with a method of re-foresting extinct reefs: with small seedlings. They grow into coral blocks that can then be planted elsewhere. Seven new reefs have been created this way in Fiji alone.Also this week: - Environmental Scandal in the US.Questionnaire: Bo Sung Seunim, Monk from South Korea.A Water House in South Africa.Mining Gold in Guyana. duration 26:25   STEREO
  • 8:00 am
    World Business [#935] A Rocky Relationship - Heather Scott COVER STORY: A ROCKY RELATIONSHIP - Germany's new government is in the process of crossing the t's and dotting the i's on the new coalition. The pro-business Free Democrats will be joining Angela Merkel's Christian Democrats in the new administration. But despite her getting the partner she wanted, the FDP may be a much more difficult bedfellow than the previous Social Democrats.
    STOCK EXCHANGE - Bartering has been around since trade began but during difficult economic times its popularity often increases. Given the current recession, any system that allows a company to do business without using its hard-earned cash is usually worth a look. < br /> FIGHTING ON THE MOUNTAINTOPS - Coal is responsible for 50% of the electricity produced in the United States, and West Virginia is the second largest coal producer in the nation. It mines around 160m tons each year, roughly a third of it by mountaintop mining, a practice that pulls coal from shallow seams on ridges and peaks. Environmentalists say mountaintop mining is destroying the Appalachian mountains, and the health of all those who live in them. The coal industry, however, says it's completely safe, and here to stay, in an argument that's becoming increasingly bitter.
    LET IT SNOW - Over the last 25 years average winter temperatures in the Alps have risen by 2 degrees meaning snowmaking has become a necessity, not a luxury. However many resorts are still suffering from the effects of global warming because existing technology only allows snow to be produced at temperatures below freezing. Until now.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#517] This week, WT explores the new realities in asset allocation. Consuelo interviews asset allocation master and bestselling author, David Darst, Chief Investment Strategist for Morgan Stanley Smith Barney who will explain how to update this essential foundation for your investment portfolio. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:00 am
    MoneyTrack [#307] Investment Clubs Investing together as a group can pay huge dividends, if it's done right. Meet Honduran immigrants Jose and Tomas Avila who are changing people's lives by teaching them how to invest in the long-term. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 9:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2127] duration 26:46   TVG
  • 10:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#2743] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    Washington Week [#4916] Health, wealth, war and national security were front and center this week.
    * The Obama administration's pay czar is ordering a drastic reduction in executive compensation at companies that received federal bailout funds including Bank of America, Citicorp, General Motors and Chrysler. The move comes amid questions about how the Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP) has operated. In addition, President Obama announced a series of steps to help stimulate small business. Deborah Solomon of The Wall Street Journal will report on the real impact these programs may have on growing the economy and getting taxpayer money back from firms that received government funds.
    * The goal of health care reform is to reduce costs and expand coverage but is that possible without a "public option?" A government-run insurance plan remains one of the main points of contention not only between Republicans and Democrats but among Democrats themselves. New polls indicate most Americans support a government program but what about doctors and health care providers? And will this week's bipartisan defeat of a Senate proposal to boost Medicare payments to doctors prove to be a setback in efforts to pass insurance reform this year? Dan Balz of The Washington Post will have answers and analysis.
    * It took 5 days and nearly 20 hours of negotiations but Afghanistan President Hamid Karzai finally agreed to accept a runoff election next month. Senator John Kerry (D-MA) traveled to Kabul to convince Karzai that reports of voter fraud and corruption raised serious questions and uncertainties about the legitimacy and credibility of his government. Doyle McManus of the Los Angeles Times will report on how the runoff election may factor into the White House's decision about troop levels in the war-torn country.
    * David Sanger of The New York Times returns from Vienna where this week Iranian negotiators tentatively agreed to delay the country's ability to build a nuclear weapon. He'll explain why the accord marks a solid first step in helping the Obama administration negotiate a more comprehensive and complicated agreement to reduce Iran's nuclear threat and how the strategy differs significantly from that of the Bush administration.
    * Plus, we pause to remember a WW friend and Pulitzer-Prize winning journalist Jack Nelson.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2103] October 23, 2009 BUSINESS ETHICS - Our panel discusses the role of ethics in business by examining Attorney General Brown's lawsuit against State Street Bank and Trust for alleged fraud against CalPERS and CalSTRS, and the Galleon Group hedge fund insider-trading scandal unfolding in Silicon Valley. Guests: Andrew Ross, Business Columnist, San Francisco Chronicle, Stu Woo, Reporter, Wall Street Journal, Sally Baack, Professor, College of Business, San Francisco State University.
    LOCAL AUTHOR'S VISIT TO AFGHANISTAN - Solomon, author and Director of the Institute for Public Accuracy, visited Kabul a week after Afghanistan's disputed presidential election in August. Since then, a United Nations investigation found widespread fraud and a runoff election is scheduled for November 7th. Solomon shares his observations and discusses the debate over the upcoming election and the Obama administration's imminent decision on whether to send more US troops.
    SEBASTIAO SALGADO - The exhibition "Then and Now" at the David Brower Center in Berkeley features work by acclaimed photographer Sebastiao Salgado. Salgado is known for images that reveal the human condition - from laborers in Latin America to refugees from war and famine in Africa and elsewhere. In the tradition of social documentary photography, he often makes his work available to social change organizations, such as Doctors without Borders, Amnesty International, and UNICEF. Produced by SPARK for This Week in Northern California.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    QUEST [#309H] Wastewater Woes/Eclipse Chasers QUEST investigates the causes of frequent sewage spills into San Francisco Bay. And journey with the eclipse chasers - adventurers who travel the world to document solar eclipses. duration 26:18   STEREO TVG
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Now on PBS [#543] Imagine you lived in a world of water. Your home is 2 feet under. You wade through it, cook on it, and sleep above it. This is the reality for hundreds of thousands of people around the world, coastal populations on the front lines of climate change. Only weeks before world leaders meet in Copenhagen to discuss climate change, Maria Hinojosa travels to Bangladesh to examine some innovative solutions - from floating schools to rice that can "hold its breath" underwater - being implemented in a country where entire communities are inundated by water, battered by cyclones, and flooded from their homes.
    The Denmark conference can't come soon enough. Scientists project global seas will flood 20% of Bangladesh by 2030, stranding some 35 million climate refugees. Some are proposing that industrial nations who contribute to global warming should open their doors to displaced Bangladeshis. Is a coastal catastrophe approaching, and what should we be doing about it?
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 12:30 pm
    Inside Washington [#2127] duration 26:46   TVG
  • 1:00 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#2743] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 1:30 pm
    John McLaughlin's One on One [#2521] duration 27:30   TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#1833] INTERNATIONAL VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN ACT: Celebrities and members of Congress are taking action to combat violence against women around the world.
    CATHOLIC CHURCH WELCOMING ANGLICANS: The Vatican is inviting traditionalist Anglicans, who oppose female and openly gay priests, to join the Catholic Church while preserving their religious traditions.
    LATINAS DROPPING OUT: Latina students in the US are at a high-risk for dropping out of school without completing their education.
    Panelists: National Council of Negro Women's Dr. Avis Jones-DeWeever; Former Labor Department Official Karen Czarnecki; Center for Equal Opportunity Chair Linda Chavez; and Progressive Commentator Patricia Sosa.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 2:30 pm
    La Plaza - Maria Hinojosa: One-On-One [#308] Ray Torres & Shirley Diaz On an average day in the US, 1,425 children are removed from their homes and placed in foster care-more than 500,000 kids a year. Almost 20% of these children are Latino. Raymond Torres, the executive director of Casey Family Services, discusses the causes of this overrepresentation, the need to enlist more Latino families to participate as foster families, and ways to reduce the number of Latino children who experience foster care in America. Shirley Diaz, a product of six different foster homes, has produced a public radio documentary about the foster care system. She brings a personal and poignant perspective to this discussion. duration 26:16   STEREO TVPG
  • 3:00 pm
    Bill Moyers Journal [#1327] A damning report from the UN Human Rights Council on the violence in Gaza late last year has put Israel on the defensive. Bill Moyers talks with the man at the center of the storm, Justice Richard Goldstone, who despite working with many pro-Israel groups and Israeli institutions in the past, has drawn intense criticism from some of Israel's supporters for his report, which said Israel's Defense Forces, as well as Hamas, may have committed war crimes in Gaza earlier this year. Goldstone is a renowned war-crimes investigator who's looked into human rights abuses in his native South Africa, as well as the former Yugoslavia, Argentina, and Rwanda. duration 56:46   STEREO
  • 4:00 pm
    Now on PBS [#543] Imagine you lived in a world of water. Your home is 2 feet under. You wade through it, cook on it, and sleep above it. This is the reality for hundreds of thousands of people around the world, coastal populations on the front lines of climate change. Only weeks before world leaders meet in Copenhagen to discuss climate change, Maria Hinojosa travels to Bangladesh to examine some innovative solutions - from floating schools to rice that can "hold its breath" underwater - being implemented in a country where entire communities are inundated by water, battered by cyclones, and flooded from their homes.
    The Denmark conference can't come soon enough. Scientists project global seas will flood 20% of Bangladesh by 2030, stranding some 35 million climate refugees. Some are proposing that industrial nations who contribute to global warming should open their doors to displaced Bangladeshis. Is a coastal catastrophe approaching, and what should we be doing about it?
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 pm
    Washington Week [#4916] Health, wealth, war and national security were front and center this week.
    * The Obama administration's pay czar is ordering a drastic reduction in executive compensation at companies that received federal bailout funds including Bank of America, Citicorp, General Motors and Chrysler. The move comes amid questions about how the Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP) has operated. In addition, President Obama announced a series of steps to help stimulate small business. Deborah Solomon of The Wall Street Journal will report on the real impact these programs may have on growing the economy and getting taxpayer money back from firms that received government funds.
    * The goal of health care reform is to reduce costs and expand coverage but is that possible without a "public option?" A government-run insurance plan remains one of the main points of contention not only between Republicans and Democrats but among Democrats themselves. New polls indicate most Americans support a government program but what about doctors and health care providers? And will this week's bipartisan defeat of a Senate proposal to boost Medicare payments to doctors prove to be a setback in efforts to pass insurance reform this year? Dan Balz of The Washington Post will have answers and analysis.
    * It took 5 days and nearly 20 hours of negotiations but Afghanistan President Hamid Karzai finally agreed to accept a runoff election next month. Senator John Kerry (D-MA) traveled to Kabul to convince Karzai that reports of voter fraud and corruption raised serious questions and uncertainties about the legitimacy and credibility of his government. Doyle McManus of the Los Angeles Times will report on how the runoff election may factor into the White House's decision about troop levels in the war-torn country.
    * David Sanger of The New York Times returns from Vienna where this week Iranian negotiators tentatively agreed to delay the country's ability to build a nuclear weapon. He'll explain why the accord marks a solid first step in helping the Obama administration negotiate a more comprehensive and complicated agreement to reduce Iran's nuclear threat and how the strategy differs significantly from that of the Bush administration.
    * Plus, we pause to remember a WW friend and Pulitzer-Prize winning journalist Jack Nelson.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:00 pm
    Inside Washington [#2127] duration 26:46   TVG
  • 5:30 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#2743] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    Bill Moyers Journal [#1327] A damning report from the UN Human Rights Council on the violence in Gaza late last year has put Israel on the defensive. Bill Moyers talks with the man at the center of the storm, Justice Richard Goldstone, who despite working with many pro-Israel groups and Israeli institutions in the past, has drawn intense criticism from some of Israel's supporters for his report, which said Israel's Defense Forces, as well as Hamas, may have committed war crimes in Gaza earlier this year. Goldstone is a renowned war-crimes investigator who's looked into human rights abuses in his native South Africa, as well as the former Yugoslavia, Argentina, and Rwanda. duration 56:46   STEREO
  • 7:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#814] Globe Trekker Special: Best American Water Treks 1 Experience some of the wettest rides in America! Kayak along the rugged Na Pali Coast in Hawaii, paddle through Alaska's Prince William Sound, canoe down the Rio Grande through the Big Bend of Texas and discover the thrill of whitewater rapids on the Gauley River in West Virginia. duration 56:40   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 8:00 pm
    Justice: What's The Right Thing to Do? [#104] Lecture Seven: John Locke is both a supporter and detractor from the theory of Libertarianism. Locke argues that in the 'state of nature', before any political structure has been established, every human has certain natural rights to life, liberty --and property. However, once we agree to enter into society, we are consenting to being governed by a system of laws. And so, Locke argues, even though government is charged with looking after one's individual rights, it is the majority that defines those rights.
    Lecture Eight: John Locke on the issue of taxation and consent. How does John Locke square away the conflict between 1) his belief that individuals have an unalienable right to life, liberty, and property and 2) that government ' through majority rule ' can tax individuals without their consent? Doesn't that amount to taking an individual's property without his/her consent? Locke's answer to that is that we are giving our 'implied consent' to taxation laws, by living in society, therefore taxation is legitimate. And, as long as government doesn't target a particular group for taxation "if it isn't arbitrary" then taxation isn't a violation of the fundamental rights of individuals.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 9:00 pm
    Final Hours: Amelia Earhart's Last Flight This powerful documentary recreates the final flight of Amelia Earhart, the noted aviation pioneer whose historic 1937 trip around the world ended in her tragic disappearance. Shot in 19 countries, it is based on "World Flight 1997," Texas aviator Linda Finch's honorary recreation of Earhart's planned flight. With the rare accreditation of the Smithsonian Institution, this informative program presents footage of Finch's flight, artfully intercut with archival footage and interviews with Earhart. Notably different from other Amelia Earhart films, this program also presents theories as to what actually occurred during the deadly flight. Produced by David Kennard and Reid Dennis. duration 56:50   STEREO TVG
  • 10:00 pm
    Through Deaf Eyes Chronicles 200 years of deaf life in America. Using historical footage and interviews with some of today's most successful deaf citizens - including Gallaudet University President I. King Jordan and actors Marlee Matlin and Bernard Bragg - the documentary examines the shared experiences of American history - family life, education, work, sports and technology - from the perspective of deaf citizens. Poignant, and sometimes humorous, the film draws on six artistic works by deaf filmmakers who present stories of conflict, prejudice and affirmation that reach the heart of what it means to be human. duration 1:56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 12:00 am
    Bill Moyers Journal [#1327] A damning report from the UN Human Rights Council on the violence in Gaza late last year has put Israel on the defensive. Bill Moyers talks with the man at the center of the storm, Justice Richard Goldstone, who despite working with many pro-Israel groups and Israeli institutions in the past, has drawn intense criticism from some of Israel's supporters for his report, which said Israel's Defense Forces, as well as Hamas, may have committed war crimes in Gaza earlier this year. Goldstone is a renowned war-crimes investigator who's looked into human rights abuses in his native South Africa, as well as the former Yugoslavia, Argentina, and Rwanda. duration 56:46   STEREO
Sunday, October 25, 2009

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TV Technical Issues

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    TV Technical Issues
    • Wed 10/15 morning: KQED Plus (KQEH) Over the Air signal down

      UPDATE: This problem has been resolved, and the OTA signal for the DT54 channels restored. (DT54.1 through 54.5) KQED Plus’ Over the Air transmission is currently off air via our KQEH transmitter on Monument Peak northeast of San Jose. Technicians are working on the problem. No current estimate regarding how long this will exist. We […]

    • KQET (DT25) Over the Air: Wed 8/27

      We are aware of the break-up issues for our DT25 Over the Air signal in the Monterey/Salinas area. This will also affect viewers of any cable or satellite signal provider using that transmitter as their source. Engineers are working on the problem.

    • Week of 8/25: Sutro Tower work (including KQED 9 Over the Air)

      (Affects several San Francisco TV & Radio stations, including KQED 9.1, 9.2 & 9.3) During the week of August 25, Monday through Friday, between 9am and 4pm, several TV and radio stations will be switching to their Auxiliary antennas. This is being done so that the tower crew can perform routine maintenance on the regular […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Comcast 9 and 709
Digital 9.1, 54.2 or 25.1

All widescreen and HD programs

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Channel 54
Comcast 10 and 710
Digital 9.2, 54.1 or 25.2

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

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KQED Life
Comcast 189
Digital 54.3

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

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KQED World
Comcast 190
Digital 9.3

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Comcast 191 & 621
Digital 54.5 or 25.3

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Comcast 192
Digital 54.4

Quality children's programming parents love too