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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Sunday, July 27, 2014

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Sunday, July 27, 2014
  • 12:00 am
    America Reframed [#202] Radio Unnameable Legendary radio personality Bob Fass revolutionized late night FM radio by serving as a cultural hub for music, politics and audience participation for nearly 50 years. Long before today's innovations in social media, Fass utilized the airwaves for mobilization encouraging luminaries and ordinary listeners to talk openly and take the program in surprising directions. Fass and his committed group of friends, peers, and listeners proved time and time again through massive, planned meetups and other similar events that radio was not a solitary experience but rather a platform to unite communities of like-minded, or even just open-minded, individuals without the dependence on large scale corporate backing. Radio Unnameable is a visual and aural collage that pulls from Bob Fass's immense archive of audio from his program, film, photographs, and video that has been sitting dormant until now. Revealing the underexposed world of independent radio, the film illustrates the intimate relationship Fass and, by extension, WBAI formed with their listeners that were strong enough to maintain the station?s role as one of the most successful listener-sponsored programs in the United States. duration 1:56:45   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Teaching Channel Presents [#308] Celebrating Science Some things run on batteries, some bubble over, some throw sparks-anything can happen in science class as students study everything from Robotics to Physics to Boyle's Law. duration 59:00   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Moyers & Company [#329H] The Conscience of a Compassionate Conservative Arthur C. Brooks says that despite the heated rhetoric of the far right, the compassionate conservatism once touted by George W. Bush isn't dead. It's alive and well at the conservative American Enterprise Institute - AEI - where Brooks became president in 2009. Residing now at the top of the conservative pecking order in Washington, Brooks advises Republican leaders in Congress and spreads AEI's message to a wider audience. His specialty, as Newsweek describes it, is "translating ideas from policy speak into soaring moral prose." One of his key ideas: the endgame of free enterprise is not to preserve wealth but to create opportunity for the poor.
    This week, Moyers and Brooks engage in a lively exchange over the safety net, which Brooks supports for the very poor, and a hike in the minimum wage, which he opposes. "The problem with the minimum wage is that it hurts the people it's supposed to help," he claims. "It's the worst way to try to wipe out the unemployment scourge that we have in this country. We don't have a low wage problem. We have an unemployment problem in the bottom 50%. America has left the bottom behind. And we have a conspiracy - we have a left wing politically that talks about solutions, but has no implementable answers that actually help poor people. And we have a right wing that traditionally doesn't even talk about poverty."
    Moyers presses Brooks on why companies like Target, McDonald's and Walmart don't pay a living wage to their employees who then have to rely on public programs to support themselves - in Walmart's case, about $4000 per worker. Brooks argues the market doesn't support higher wages and agrees that the country needs public policies that make work pay for those who perform it. While "free enterprise is a system of institutions and cultural values that respect the individual," he says, "it has no hostility" toward the idea of government or a safety net.
    Once a classical musician who took his French horn on the road with the fabled guitarist Charlie Byrd, Arthur Brooks taught economics, government and social entrepreneurship at Syracuse University. He is the author of hundreds of articles and 10 books, including his most recent, "The Road to Freedom: How to Win the Fight for Free Enterprise."
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 am
    Asia This Week [#415] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5403H] * A dizzying array of international crises from the Middle East to Ukraine has garnered both global attention and outrage.
    In the Middle East, Hamas and Israel remain locked in combat. Despite intensive mediation efforts by the United States and Egypt, efforts to stop the conflict between the Israelis and Palestinians collapsed and aggressions on both sides show no signs of abating.
    In eastern Ukraine, the standoff between the government and pro-Russian separatists has only escalated in the days following last week's downing of a Malaysian jetliner hampering investigation and recovery efforts. Meanwhile, the heated rhetoric between the United States and Europe against Russia is making a tense situation even more unpredictable.
    Gwen Ifill will examine the options the US and European nations are considering to address the cascade of international crisis with Peter Baker of The New York Times, Nancy Youssef of McClatchy Newspapers, and Doyle McManus of the Los Angeles Times.
    * President Obama will address the recent surge of children illegally entering the US during a White House meeting with the presidents of El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras on Friday. Ed O'Keefe of The Washington Post, who interviewed two of the visiting leaders this week, will report on the discussions with the president; why immigration reform has become a foreign policy challenge for the Obama administration; and how efforts to come up with a solution in Congress appear stalled.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3231H] duration 27:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:00 am
    Charlie Rose - The Week [#202] * Robert Gates, former Secretary of Defense * Mike Allen of Politico *Preet Bharara, US attorney for the Southern District of New York * Idina Menzel, star of the Broadway musical If/Then * Artist Jeff Koons duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:30 am
    Focus On Europe [#3230] Prudery In Putinland: Latest In Russian Censorship Laws Italy: Europe's Mightiest Volcano - Mount Etna is both fascinating and feared, and it attracts thousands of tourists every year. But for two weeks there have been new eruptive fissures. The summit has been closed off since they appeared. Three volcanoes constantly keep Italy on tenterhooks: Stromboli, the most active; the unpredictable Vesuvius; and the tallest, Mount Etna. At a height of 3352 meters, it visibly dominates much of the eastern coast of Sicily. Time and again, earthquakes shake the region, clouds of ash darken the skies and lava flows destroy houses high up on the mountain. A team of volcanologists and rangers on site monitor every movement Etna makes. Theoretically, an eruption could happen at any time. Russia Censorship: Prudery in Putinland - Russia is being flooded by a wave of morality legislation. Scantily-clad statues, swear words and lace undergarments are coming into the sights of Duma representatives. What at first sight looks like a piece of bungling could be the latest in a raft of regressive laws designed to enforce moral standards. On July 1st this year, laws came into effect aimed at protecting citizens from low-quality lingerie and swear words. De facto, just under 90% of the underclothing available in Russia was banned. As far as vulgarity and profanity are concerned, the bans mean that in the media and the arts many songs with "indecorous" language can no longer be played on the radio without being censored with bleep sounds. Not even the statue of Apollo in front of the Bolshoi has escaped the wrath of the Moscow moralists: since the theater was renovated, its loins have been covered with a fig leaf. Spain: Deadly Danger for Europe's Vultures - Spain is home to the largest population of vultures in Europe, but their numbers are steadily declining. A new drug for cattle now threatens to wipe out the vultures altogether. Vultures have long had a bad reputation in Spain. Time and time again, the birds are illegally poisoned, because they are said to prey on living cattle. Now the EU has authorized the administration of veterinary diclofenac to livestock in Spain and Italy - a deadly threat to the four species of vultures that live in Spain. The anti-inflammatory drug has already led to the near-extinction of the vulture population in India, Pakistan and Nepal. The birds ingest the substance when eating the carcasses of cattle treated with the drug, and die of kidney failure. Czech Republic: Hosting the Five Thousand - When refugees from the former East Germany camping in the West German embassy in Prague were finally given official permission to leave for West Germany, it was a milestone that presaged the fall of the Berlin Wall. 25 years ago, many helpers behind the scenes helped make it possible. When Hans-Dietrich Genscher, West German Foreign Minister at the time, announced to the refugees in the embassy in Prague that they would be allowed to emigrate to West Germany, it was an iconic moment in post-war German history. What is less well known is the story of Hermann Huber, the West German ambassador in the Prague embassy. Reporter Tilmann Bunz met him and tells how the ambassador and his wife faced the task of sheltering 5000 refugees in summer 1989. duration 26:10   STEREO TVG
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    America Reframed [#202] Radio Unnameable Legendary radio personality Bob Fass revolutionized late night FM radio by serving as a cultural hub for music, politics and audience participation for nearly 50 years. Long before today's innovations in social media, Fass utilized the airwaves for mobilization encouraging luminaries and ordinary listeners to talk openly and take the program in surprising directions. Fass and his committed group of friends, peers, and listeners proved time and time again through massive, planned meetups and other similar events that radio was not a solitary experience but rather a platform to unite communities of like-minded, or even just open-minded, individuals without the dependence on large scale corporate backing. Radio Unnameable is a visual and aural collage that pulls from Bob Fass's immense archive of audio from his program, film, photographs, and video that has been sitting dormant until now. Revealing the underexposed world of independent radio, the film illustrates the intimate relationship Fass and, by extension, WBAI formed with their listeners that were strong enough to maintain the station?s role as one of the most successful listener-sponsored programs in the United States. duration 1:56:45   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:00 am
    Asia Biz Forecast [#515] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1105] Rising Investment Risks This week features an exclusive interview with "Great Investor" Bill Wilby and international economist and strategist Nick Sargen on rising global investment risks and how they are handling them. Guests: Nicholas Sargen, Chief Economist and Senior Investment Advisor, Fort Washington Investment Advisors; William Wilby, Private Investor, Former Portfolio Manager, Oppenheimer Global Fund. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:00 am
    Truth About Money with Ric Edelman [#321H] Ric Edelman answers the question: how can you go to college if you haven't saved any money for tuition? And where should you put your future finances? One scientist says some of your investments should be out of this world. Plus, Jean Edelman shows us the benefits of doing the right thing in The Other Side of Money. All that and more on this edition of The Truth About Money with Ric Edelman. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:30 am
    Between The Lines with Barry Kibrick [#1406] Sam Harris - Ham-Slices of Life (Singer-Songwriter-humorist) Sam Harris is a multiplatinum recording artist who first came to fame as the first winner of the hit series Star Search. He now turns his talent to the pen and as The Los Angeles Times notes: "He is vital and emotionally rich." duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 10:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3231H] duration 27:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5403H] * A dizzying array of international crises from the Middle East to Ukraine has garnered both global attention and outrage.
    In the Middle East, Hamas and Israel remain locked in combat. Despite intensive mediation efforts by the United States and Egypt, efforts to stop the conflict between the Israelis and Palestinians collapsed and aggressions on both sides show no signs of abating.
    In eastern Ukraine, the standoff between the government and pro-Russian separatists has only escalated in the days following last week's downing of a Malaysian jetliner hampering investigation and recovery efforts. Meanwhile, the heated rhetoric between the United States and Europe against Russia is making a tense situation even more unpredictable.
    Gwen Ifill will examine the options the US and European nations are considering to address the cascade of international crisis with Peter Baker of The New York Times, Nancy Youssef of McClatchy Newspapers, and Doyle McManus of the Los Angeles Times.
    * President Obama will address the recent surge of children illegally entering the US during a White House meeting with the presidents of El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras on Friday. Ed O'Keefe of The Washington Post, who interviewed two of the visiting leaders this week, will report on the discussions with the president; why immigration reform has become a foreign policy challenge for the Obama administration; and how efforts to come up with a solution in Congress appear stalled.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    KQED NEWSROOM [#136H] Unaccompanied Child Migrants, Gov. Brown's Appointees, New Species at Cal Academy
    Unaccompanied Children Crossing the U.S. Border

    Sen. Darrell Steinberg
    California Senate President pro Tem Darrell Steinberg and a delegation of state lawmakers returned this week from a 10-day trip to El Salvador, Panama and Guatemala. They met with government officials to understand the economic and social conditions contributing to the recent influx of unaccompanied minors attempting to cross into the United States. Sen. Steinberg shares his thoughts with Scott Shafer about immigration reform and public policy to help address this growing problem.

    Panel Discussion
    Last month President Obama acknowledged that the tens of thousands of unaccompanied, undocumented minors trying to cross the U.S.- Mexico border constituted an "urgent humanitarian situation." The minors, who are mainly from Mexico and other Central American countries, pose legal and political challenges to the administration, as public opposition to detention centers to house them grows. Thuy Vu moderates a panel discussion about the impact in the Bay Area, where some of these children end up..

    Guests:
    • Judge Dana Marks, San Francisco Immigration Courts
    • Debra Saunders, San Francisco Chronicle
    • Ian Gordon, Mother Jones

    Further Reporting:
    Undocumented Kids Face Tough Legal Obstacles to Staying in U.S.
    State Lawmakers Visit Central America Amid Exodus of Unaccompanied Minors

    Gov. Brown's Judicial Appointees
    Gov. Jerry Brown this week nominated Stanford law professor Mariano-Florentino Ceullar to the California Supreme Court. Known by his nickname, "Tino," Cuellar is a well-respected academic but he has no judicial experience. The governor made two previous nominations, and at least one more is coming. Scott Shafer looks at the governor's recent judicial appointees and how they're changing the face of the court system.

    New Species at California Academy of Sciences
    Researchers from the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco recently returned from an expedition to the Verde Island passage in the Philippines. It's a place they call the "center of the center of marine biodiversity." More unique marine species live in that spot than anywhere else in the ocean -- and now some of their discoveries are on display in the Steinhart Aquarium.

    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 11:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#329H] The Conscience of a Compassionate Conservative Arthur C. Brooks says that despite the heated rhetoric of the far right, the compassionate conservatism once touted by George W. Bush isn't dead. It's alive and well at the conservative American Enterprise Institute - AEI - where Brooks became president in 2009. Residing now at the top of the conservative pecking order in Washington, Brooks advises Republican leaders in Congress and spreads AEI's message to a wider audience. His specialty, as Newsweek describes it, is "translating ideas from policy speak into soaring moral prose." One of his key ideas: the endgame of free enterprise is not to preserve wealth but to create opportunity for the poor.
    This week, Moyers and Brooks engage in a lively exchange over the safety net, which Brooks supports for the very poor, and a hike in the minimum wage, which he opposes. "The problem with the minimum wage is that it hurts the people it's supposed to help," he claims. "It's the worst way to try to wipe out the unemployment scourge that we have in this country. We don't have a low wage problem. We have an unemployment problem in the bottom 50%. America has left the bottom behind. And we have a conspiracy - we have a left wing politically that talks about solutions, but has no implementable answers that actually help poor people. And we have a right wing that traditionally doesn't even talk about poverty."
    Moyers presses Brooks on why companies like Target, McDonald's and Walmart don't pay a living wage to their employees who then have to rely on public programs to support themselves - in Walmart's case, about $4000 per worker. Brooks argues the market doesn't support higher wages and agrees that the country needs public policies that make work pay for those who perform it. While "free enterprise is a system of institutions and cultural values that respect the individual," he says, "it has no hostility" toward the idea of government or a safety net.
    Once a classical musician who took his French horn on the road with the fabled guitarist Charlie Byrd, Arthur Brooks taught economics, government and social entrepreneurship at Syracuse University. He is the author of hundreds of articles and 10 books, including his most recent, "The Road to Freedom: How to Win the Fight for Free Enterprise."
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1747] LATINO CONVERTS TO ISLAM - We visit the Islamic Center of Greater Miami to look at the rising number of Latino Muslims in the US - as many as 250,000, according to estimates. Some of the converts say that in Islam they have found theological simplicity and "no intermediaries with God." The Islamic Circle of North America reports that more than half of the US Latino converts are women. "I just felt that the minute I put my head down to the ground," says Nadia Echevrria, "I felt like I was really talking to God."
    RESPONDING TO THE MIGRANT CRISIS - How are religious groups trying to help children caught at the US border? "It's not like your typical disaster, where churches clean up after a hurricane or a tornado," says Kevin Eckstrom, editor-in-chief of Religion News Service. "This is much more complicated."
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:30 pm
    QUEST [#603H] Deep Water Corals/Uganda Chimps Travel thousands of feet below the ocean's surface to explore fragile deep sea corals off the California coast. Meet Bay Area engineers creating detailed virtual records of the world's great monuments, including their realistic recreation of the Mexican ruins of Chichen Itza. Plus, discover the Oakland Zoo's efforts to protect chimpanzees from illegal poaching in Uganda. duration 26:21   STEREO TVG
  • 1:00 pm
    Miller Center's American Forum [#2205H] The Limits of Espionage The former CIA chief counsel JOHN RIZZO who approved the use of water boarding to interrogate Al Queda suspects and intelligence analysis scholar GENEVIEVE LESTER discuss and debate what the boundaries of espionage should be-especially involving alleged torture and when the United States spies on its own citizens. Rizzo is the author of Company Man: Thirty Years of Controversy and Crisis in the CIA. Final segment of the show includes former CIA Inspector General Frederick Hitz-who says the CIA was wrong to engage in torture. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1316] Globe Trekker Special: World War I Zay visits the Museum of The Great War in the French town of Meaux, tours the Confrecourt quarries that sheltered French troops, journeys to Ypres in Belgium where poison gas was first used as a weapon, explores the tunnels in Vauquois, discovers the site in Fromelles where Australian soldiers were buried in mass graves, observes a vintage tank near Cambrai, watches WWI-era planes in flight at a Paris airshow, visits the battlefield at the St. Quentin Canal where U.S. troops first broke through German lines and pays his respects at St. Symphorien Cemetery in Mons, Belgium where some of the last soldiers killed in the war are buried. duration 57:35   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 3:00 pm
    My Wild Affair [#102] The Ape Who Went to College This is the incredible story of Chantek, the orangutan raised as a human child on an American university campus during the 70s and 80s. Taught to speak in sign language, he is now living among his own kind at Zoo Atlanta, although he describes himself as an "orangutan person. " duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 pm
    Nova [#4010H] Australia's First 4 Billion Years: Life Explodes Of all the continents on Earth, none preserves a more spectacular story of its origins than Australia. Nova's mini-series takes viewers on a rollicking adventure from the birth of the Earth to the emergence of the world we know today. With help from high-energy host and scientist Richard Smith, we meet titanic dinosaurs and giant kangaroos, sea monsters and prehistoric crustaceans, disappearing mountains and deadly asteroids. This is the untold story of the Land Down Under, the one island continent that has got it all. duration 55:31   STEREO TVPG
  • 5:00 pm
    Amazing Underground Secrets [#102H] Secrets & Treasures The underground world is one of secrets, ideal for hiding everything from misdeeds to the world's greatest works of art. This program reveals some of the most exciting discoveries of buried treasure - then takes us to another kind of secret, the sort that governments like to hide, not just from their enemies, but from their own people. From ancient history right up to the present day, the underground world is the first choice for those seeking concealment. duration 55:57   STEREO TVPG
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour Weekend [#194H] Included: NewsHour Weekend explores how the small Pacific Island nation of Kiribati is taking strides to protect the health of the world's oceans, as the country implements a ban on commercial fishing in a vast swath of the Pacific marine park. That, and the weekend's news, online and on-air. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    KQED NEWSROOM [#136H] Unaccompanied Child Migrants, Gov. Brown's Appointees, New Species at Cal Academy
    Unaccompanied Children Crossing the U.S. Border

    Sen. Darrell Steinberg
    California Senate President pro Tem Darrell Steinberg and a delegation of state lawmakers returned this week from a 10-day trip to El Salvador, Panama and Guatemala. They met with government officials to understand the economic and social conditions contributing to the recent influx of unaccompanied minors attempting to cross into the United States. Sen. Steinberg shares his thoughts with Scott Shafer about immigration reform and public policy to help address this growing problem.

    Panel Discussion
    Last month President Obama acknowledged that the tens of thousands of unaccompanied, undocumented minors trying to cross the U.S.- Mexico border constituted an "urgent humanitarian situation." The minors, who are mainly from Mexico and other Central American countries, pose legal and political challenges to the administration, as public opposition to detention centers to house them grows. Thuy Vu moderates a panel discussion about the impact in the Bay Area, where some of these children end up..

    Guests:
    • Judge Dana Marks, San Francisco Immigration Courts
    • Debra Saunders, San Francisco Chronicle
    • Ian Gordon, Mother Jones

    Further Reporting:
    Undocumented Kids Face Tough Legal Obstacles to Staying in U.S.
    State Lawmakers Visit Central America Amid Exodus of Unaccompanied Minors

    Gov. Brown's Judicial Appointees
    Gov. Jerry Brown this week nominated Stanford law professor Mariano-Florentino Ceullar to the California Supreme Court. Known by his nickname, "Tino," Cuellar is a well-respected academic but he has no judicial experience. The governor made two previous nominations, and at least one more is coming. Scott Shafer looks at the governor's recent judicial appointees and how they're changing the face of the court system.

    New Species at California Academy of Sciences
    Researchers from the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco recently returned from an expedition to the Verde Island passage in the Philippines. It's a place they call the "center of the center of marine biodiversity." More unique marine species live in that spot than anywhere else in the ocean -- and now some of their discoveries are on display in the Steinhart Aquarium.

    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 7:00 pm
    Global Voices [#709] My So-Called Enemy Spanning 7 years, this film follows 6 Palestinian and Israeli teenage girls committed to justice and mutual understanding after participating in a women's leadership program called Building Bridges for Peace. This heart and mind-opening film documents how the young women's transformative experience of knowing their "enemies" as human beings in the US meets with the realities of their lives back home in the Middle East. A film about building bridges of understanding in our own communities, it offers audiences profound messages about tolerance, inclusion and respect, conflict prevention and resolution - and the vital role of women in peacemaking. duration 1:26:32   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:30 pm
    Serving America: Memories of Peace Corps This program highlights the experiences of some of the nearly 3000 volunteers who served during the early years of the Peace Corps. A mix of archival film and photographs, along with personal stories from former volunteers, tells a story of service and idealism. Interviews convey the volunteers' passion, commitment and bravery as they lived and worked in developing countries, including South and Central America, Africa and the Middle East. From almost fatal obstacles to spiritual epiphanies, these men and women describe their transformative experiences. Donna Shalala, former US Secretary of Health and Human Services (1993-2001), recounts the adventure of serving in Iran between 1962 and 1964. "What the Peace Corps really did is make me a citizen of the world," says Shalala. duration 26:44   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:00 pm
    My Wild Affair [#102] The Ape Who Went to College This is the incredible story of Chantek, the orangutan raised as a human child on an American university campus during the 70s and 80s. Taught to speak in sign language, he is now living among his own kind at Zoo Atlanta, although he describes himself as an "orangutan person. " duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:00 pm
    Pioneers In Aviation: The Race to the Moon [#102] The War Years Documents the 1930s and 40s, as the clouds of war once again began to gather over Europe. With all of Western Europe a German stronghold by the summer of 1940, and England under attack, President Roosevelt calls upon the captains of his Aviation Industry-declaring that America must become "the Arsenal of Democracy. " Under Donald Douglas's leadership, and Dutch Kindelberger's guidance, the U.S. aviation industry unites to tackle the biggest production job in industrial history. With Boeing, Douglas, and North American Aviation factories working around the clock, they produce some of the most legendary aircraft in American history-giving the Allies air supremacy in both the European and Pacific theaters and, ultimately, victory in World War II. Highlights include:
    * Newly discovered footage of the Second World War's most storied military operation: the 1942 Doolittle/Tokyo Raid, flown by North American Aviation's B-25 "Mitchell bomber.
    * Newly discovered footage of Jimmy Doolittle's triumphant return to North American Aviation to share his victory with Dutch Kindelberger and the North American employees.
    * Newly recovered newsreel footage from the1940s, offering a rare glimpse inside the wartime factories at Boeing, Douglas, and North American Aviation.
    * A Lowell Thomas-narrated World War II newsreel of the legendary North American P-51 Mustang in the skies over Berlin.
    duration 56:19   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 11:00 pm
    Global Voices [#709] My So-Called Enemy Spanning 7 years, this film follows 6 Palestinian and Israeli teenage girls committed to justice and mutual understanding after participating in a women's leadership program called Building Bridges for Peace. This heart and mind-opening film documents how the young women's transformative experience of knowing their "enemies" as human beings in the US meets with the realities of their lives back home in the Middle East. A film about building bridges of understanding in our own communities, it offers audiences profound messages about tolerance, inclusion and respect, conflict prevention and resolution - and the vital role of women in peacemaking. duration 1:26:32   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:30 am
    Serving America: Memories of Peace Corps This program highlights the experiences of some of the nearly 3000 volunteers who served during the early years of the Peace Corps. A mix of archival film and photographs, along with personal stories from former volunteers, tells a story of service and idealism. Interviews convey the volunteers' passion, commitment and bravery as they lived and worked in developing countries, including South and Central America, Africa and the Middle East. From almost fatal obstacles to spiritual epiphanies, these men and women describe their transformative experiences. Donna Shalala, former US Secretary of Health and Human Services (1993-2001), recounts the adventure of serving in Iran between 1962 and 1964. "What the Peace Corps really did is make me a citizen of the world," says Shalala. duration 26:44   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
Sunday, July 27, 2014

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TV Technical Issues

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    TV Technical Issues
    • Wed 10/15 morning: KQED Plus (KQEH) Over the Air signal down

      UPDATE: This problem has been resolved, and the OTA signal for the DT54 channels restored. (DT54.1 through 54.5) KQED Plus’ Over the Air transmission is currently off air via our KQEH transmitter on Monument Peak northeast of San Jose. Technicians are working on the problem. No current estimate regarding how long this will exist. We […]

    • KQET (DT25) Over the Air: Wed 8/27

      We are aware of the break-up issues for our DT25 Over the Air signal in the Monterey/Salinas area. This will also affect viewers of any cable or satellite signal provider using that transmitter as their source. Engineers are working on the problem.

    • Week of 8/25: Sutro Tower work (including KQED 9 Over the Air)

      (Affects several San Francisco TV & Radio stations, including KQED 9.1, 9.2 & 9.3) During the week of August 25, Monday through Friday, between 9am and 4pm, several TV and radio stations will be switching to their Auxiliary antennas. This is being done so that the tower crew can perform routine maintenance on the regular […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

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KQED 9
Comcast 9 and 709
Digital 9.1, 54.2 or 25.1

All widescreen and HD programs

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Comcast 10 and 710
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KQED Life
Comcast 189
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KQED World
Comcast 190
Digital 9.3

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Comcast 191 & 621
Digital 54.5 or 25.3

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KQED Kids
Comcast 192
Digital 54.4

Quality children's programming parents love too