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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Tuesday, June 10, 2014

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Tuesday, June 10, 2014
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10946] VA WAIT TIMES - After allegations of malfeasance proved true, the Department of Veterans Affairs now says that 57,000 veterans have been waiting 90 days or more for their first medical appointment. Gwen Ifill analyzes the report with Ralph Ibson, national policy director of the Wounded Warrior Project, and Dr. Sam Foote, the former Veterans Affairs doctor who drew attention to the misconduct in Phoenix.
    KARACHI AIRPORT ATTACK - A Taliban attack on Pakistan's busiest airport left over two dozen dead on Sunday. Judy Woodruff speaks with Christine Fair, an assistant professor at Georgetown University, and Shuja Nawaz, director of the South Asia Center at the Atlantic Council to get more on the attack and the larger picture in Pakistan.
    STANDARDS BACKLASH - As educators and lawmakers across the nation are engaged in ever-escalating disputes over a set of education standards known as "Common Core," Louisiana state legislators are debating whether or not to repeal the curriculum it adopted in 2010. Louisiana Public Broadcasting's Shauna Sanford reports on how the debate is playing out in that state.
    STUDENT DEBT - President Obama approved an executive order on Monday that limits some student loan payments to 10 percent of personal income. Gwen Ifill discusses the rising costs of education and the impact of this executive order with Richard Vedder, director of the Center for College Affordability & Productivity, and Deanne Loonin, director of the National Consumer Law Center's Student Loan Borrower Assistance Project.
    ALL THE WAY - "Breaking Bad" star Bryan Cranston won a Tony Award on Sunday for his portrayal of President Lyndon B. Johnson in the Broadway play, "All The Way." Jeffrey Brown brings us a second look at his conversation with Cranston in New York City, recorded earlier this spring.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#33114] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#3220] Tavis talks with the music director of LA Opera James Conlon. The 2-time Grammy-winning composer and conductor explains his passion for introducing the work of composers that are not well-known to contemporary audiences. Tavis also chats with Grammy-winning singer-songwriter-producer Ledisi. The multiple Grammy-nominated artist shares the backstory of her latest CD, "The Truth." duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Global Voices [#702] In The Matter of Cha Jung Hee Her passport said she was Cha Jung Hee. She knew she was not. So began a 40-year deception for a Korean adoptee who came to the United States in 1966. Told to keep her true identity secret from her new American family, the 8-year-old girl quickly forgot she had ever been anyone else. But why had her identity been switched? And who was the real Cha Jung Hee? In the Matter of Cha Jung Hee is the search to find the answers, as acclaimed filmmaker Deann Borshay Liem (First Person Plural, POV 2000) returns to her native Korea to find her "double," the mysterious girl whose place she took in America. duration 52:52   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Newsline [#5052] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#3221] Tavis talks with Rep. Xavier Becerra, chair of the House Democratic Caucus, and 10-year-old Jersey Vargas - a real-life face behind immigration statistics. The California congressman - co-sponsor of the bill known as HR15 - and the pint-sized activist weigh in on US immigration policy and the impact on families. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 am
    Asia This Week [#408] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:30 am
    Focus On Europe [#3223] The Russian Loyalists In Latvia ALBANIA: THE NEW WOMEN'S MOVEMENT - Time seems to have stood still in the mountain villages of northern Albania. Alongside the state law, the Kanun, a set of laws and norms dating back to the Middle Ages, is still in force here. The back-breaking work in the fields is considered women's work in Albania. That was also true under Communism. In the Catholic stronghold of the north, the Kanun also survived the dictatorship of Enver Hoxha. Under the Kanun, the wife is considered the husband's property. He is permitted to beat and even to kill her if she is disobedient or unfaithful. Fabiola Egro is trying to change that. She's a pivotal figure in the Albanian women's movement.
    TURKEY: A MAYOR FROM GERMANY - In southeastern Turkey, women in politics are not yet commonplace. The majority-Kurdish society is traditionally dominated by men. Despite that, 27-year-old Leyla Imret was elected as mayor of Cizre, a city with about 11,000 residents. And she's not just unusual because she's a woman - Leyla Imret comes from Bremen, Germany. A few years ago, she decided to visit eastern Turkey, where her Kurdish parents were born. In a spontaneous decision, she decided to stay in Cizre.
    LATVIA: THE RUSSIAN LOYALISTS - In the wake of the Crimea crisis, many people in the Baltic countries are concerned. They're wondering how their own citizens of Russian descent would respond in the event of an attack on their country. That's also true in Latvia, where nearly every third citizen has Russian ancestry. Igor and Valerie are from Latgale. It's the easternmost region of Latvia and home to many people of Russian descent. Both Igor and Valerie say they are loyal to Latvia. But some in Latvia do approve of President Vladimir Putin's policies and actions in neighboring Russia. Igor and Valerie are not among them. They're voluntary members of the defense force and take part in military exercises. If need be, they'd defend Latvia against Russian soldiers.
    NETHERLANDS: THE CATCH OF THE DAY IS PLASTIC - Every year, almost 5 million tons of plastic waste winds up in the ocean. Now Fishing for Litter, an initiative started by fishermen, has declared war on marine pollution. Only a small portion of the plastic waste in the sea can be seen floating on the surface; most of the garbage lies on the seafloor. Many marine animals suffer painful deaths as a result. At the other end of the food chain, little is known about the effects the waste could have on humans. Now fishermen from the Netherlands have begun collecting the garbage that gets caught in their nets. The initiative is growing, with hundreds of fishermen now collecting tons of plastic each year. Still, at the current rate, it's estimated that it would take 79,000 more years to rid the oceans of plastic waste.
    POLAND: THE ROUND TABLE REVISITED - The Round Table Talks in 1989 marked the beginning of Poland's road toward democracy. The original table is displayed at the presidential palace in Warsaw. The 1989 negotiations at this table have gone down in history. The talks led to the overturning of the ban on the Solidarnosc trade union and to a partially-free parliamentary election. 25 years ago, on June 4 and June 18, Poland held its first elections since the Second World War. The elections spelled the end to Communist rule in Poland.
    duration 26:10   STEREO TVG
  • 5:00 am
    Slavery By Another Name This documentary challenges one of America's most cherished assumptions: the belief that slavery in this country ended with Abraham Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation of 1863. It tells a harrowing story of how in the South, even as chattel slavery came to an end, new forms of involuntary servitude, including convict leasing, debt slavery and peonage, took its place with shocking force - brutalizing and ultimately circumscribing the lives of hundreds of thousands of African Americans well into the 20th century. It was a system in which men, often guilty of no crime at all, were arrested, compelled to work without pay, repeatedly bought and sold and coerced to do the bidding of masters.
    The program spans eight decades, from 1865 to 1945, revealing the interlocking forces in both the South and the North that enabled this "neoslavery" to begin and persist. Using archival photographs and dramatic re-enactments, filmed on location in Alabama and Georgia, it tells the forgotten stories of both victims and perpetrators of neoslavery and includes interviews with their descendants living today. The program also features interviews with Douglas Blackmon, author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning book "Slavery by Another Name" and with leading scholars of this period.
    duration 1:26:46   STEREO TVPG-VL (Secondary audio: none)
  • MORNING
  • 6:30 am
    One Night In March This program tells the story of a historic college basketball game that captured the national imagination, influenced a state and helped redefine a sport. Interviews, rare footage and archival photos transport viewers back to a tumultuous time in US history, just as the Civil Rights movement began gaining momentum throughout the South. In the late 1950s and early '60s, Mississippi State University's powerhouse basketball program earned several conference titles and national rankings.
    Despite their success, the Bulldogs could not play in the NCAA national championship due to an unwritten rule prohibiting all-white Mississippi collegiate athletic teams from competing against integrated teams. Mississippi State's president, its head basketball coach and their players ultimately risked their safety and their futures by defying this rule not to mention the governor and state legislature in pursuit of a national championship. This award-winning doc recounts the 1962-1963 season and the events leading up to the team eventually playing in the tournament against the integrated Loyola University (Chicago) club. It concludes with a return trip to Loyola, where the former players from those teams reunite and celebrate the landmark game they participated in 50 years earlier.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 7:00 am
    Local USA [#114] Hunger In America Food insecurities and portraits of the hungry in America; the ironic story of Californian farmers who don't have enough to eat; a suburban Chicago family feeling the economic pinch at the dinner table; and big city food deserts. duration 27:09   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:30 am
    Local USA [#113] Drive Like A Girl This documentary follows New York's champion all-girls robotics team, The Iron Maidens, just one year after they beat more than 60 male-dominated teams in a regional competition. Though they advanced to the national stage in Atlanta, GA, they lost before winning it all. Now, they've returned for another shot at the title. They had six weeks to design, program and build a robot alongside their brother team and one of their competitors, the Sciborgs. The struggles they face reveal what it takes to be a group of girls excelling at a boys' game and their successes are a glimpse at the changing roles of females in science and technology. duration 26:41   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:00 am
    Global Voices [#702] In The Matter of Cha Jung Hee Her passport said she was Cha Jung Hee. She knew she was not. So began a 40-year deception for a Korean adoptee who came to the United States in 1966. Told to keep her true identity secret from her new American family, the 8-year-old girl quickly forgot she had ever been anyone else. But why had her identity been switched? And who was the real Cha Jung Hee? In the Matter of Cha Jung Hee is the search to find the answers, as acclaimed filmmaker Deann Borshay Liem (First Person Plural, POV 2000) returns to her native Korea to find her "double," the mysterious girl whose place she took in America. duration 52:52   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:00 am
    Tavis Smiley [#3221] Tavis talks with Rep. Xavier Becerra, chair of the House Democratic Caucus, and 10-year-old Jersey Vargas - a real-life face behind immigration statistics. The California congressman - co-sponsor of the bill known as HR15 - and the pint-sized activist weigh in on US immigration policy and the impact on families. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#3220] Tavis talks with the music director of LA Opera James Conlon. The 2-time Grammy-winning composer and conductor explains his passion for introducing the work of composers that are not well-known to contemporary audiences. Tavis also chats with Grammy-winning singer-songwriter-producer Ledisi. The multiple Grammy-nominated artist shares the backstory of her latest CD, "The Truth." duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:00 am
    Asia This Week [#408] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:30 am
    Focus On Europe [#3223] The Russian Loyalists In Latvia ALBANIA: THE NEW WOMEN'S MOVEMENT - Time seems to have stood still in the mountain villages of northern Albania. Alongside the state law, the Kanun, a set of laws and norms dating back to the Middle Ages, is still in force here. The back-breaking work in the fields is considered women's work in Albania. That was also true under Communism. In the Catholic stronghold of the north, the Kanun also survived the dictatorship of Enver Hoxha. Under the Kanun, the wife is considered the husband's property. He is permitted to beat and even to kill her if she is disobedient or unfaithful. Fabiola Egro is trying to change that. She's a pivotal figure in the Albanian women's movement.
    TURKEY: A MAYOR FROM GERMANY - In southeastern Turkey, women in politics are not yet commonplace. The majority-Kurdish society is traditionally dominated by men. Despite that, 27-year-old Leyla Imret was elected as mayor of Cizre, a city with about 11,000 residents. And she's not just unusual because she's a woman - Leyla Imret comes from Bremen, Germany. A few years ago, she decided to visit eastern Turkey, where her Kurdish parents were born. In a spontaneous decision, she decided to stay in Cizre.
    LATVIA: THE RUSSIAN LOYALISTS - In the wake of the Crimea crisis, many people in the Baltic countries are concerned. They're wondering how their own citizens of Russian descent would respond in the event of an attack on their country. That's also true in Latvia, where nearly every third citizen has Russian ancestry. Igor and Valerie are from Latgale. It's the easternmost region of Latvia and home to many people of Russian descent. Both Igor and Valerie say they are loyal to Latvia. But some in Latvia do approve of President Vladimir Putin's policies and actions in neighboring Russia. Igor and Valerie are not among them. They're voluntary members of the defense force and take part in military exercises. If need be, they'd defend Latvia against Russian soldiers.
    NETHERLANDS: THE CATCH OF THE DAY IS PLASTIC - Every year, almost 5 million tons of plastic waste winds up in the ocean. Now Fishing for Litter, an initiative started by fishermen, has declared war on marine pollution. Only a small portion of the plastic waste in the sea can be seen floating on the surface; most of the garbage lies on the seafloor. Many marine animals suffer painful deaths as a result. At the other end of the food chain, little is known about the effects the waste could have on humans. Now fishermen from the Netherlands have begun collecting the garbage that gets caught in their nets. The initiative is growing, with hundreds of fishermen now collecting tons of plastic each year. Still, at the current rate, it's estimated that it would take 79,000 more years to rid the oceans of plastic waste.
    POLAND: THE ROUND TABLE REVISITED - The Round Table Talks in 1989 marked the beginning of Poland's road toward democracy. The original table is displayed at the presidential palace in Warsaw. The 1989 negotiations at this table have gone down in history. The talks led to the overturning of the ban on the Solidarnosc trade union and to a partially-free parliamentary election. 25 years ago, on June 4 and June 18, Poland held its first elections since the Second World War. The elections spelled the end to Communist rule in Poland.
    duration 26:10   STEREO TVG
  • 11:00 am
    Slavery By Another Name This documentary challenges one of America's most cherished assumptions: the belief that slavery in this country ended with Abraham Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation of 1863. It tells a harrowing story of how in the South, even as chattel slavery came to an end, new forms of involuntary servitude, including convict leasing, debt slavery and peonage, took its place with shocking force - brutalizing and ultimately circumscribing the lives of hundreds of thousands of African Americans well into the 20th century. It was a system in which men, often guilty of no crime at all, were arrested, compelled to work without pay, repeatedly bought and sold and coerced to do the bidding of masters.
    The program spans eight decades, from 1865 to 1945, revealing the interlocking forces in both the South and the North that enabled this "neoslavery" to begin and persist. Using archival photographs and dramatic re-enactments, filmed on location in Alabama and Georgia, it tells the forgotten stories of both victims and perpetrators of neoslavery and includes interviews with their descendants living today. The program also features interviews with Douglas Blackmon, author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning book "Slavery by Another Name" and with leading scholars of this period.
    duration 1:26:46   STEREO TVPG-VL (Secondary audio: none)
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:30 pm
    One Night In March This program tells the story of a historic college basketball game that captured the national imagination, influenced a state and helped redefine a sport. Interviews, rare footage and archival photos transport viewers back to a tumultuous time in US history, just as the Civil Rights movement began gaining momentum throughout the South. In the late 1950s and early '60s, Mississippi State University's powerhouse basketball program earned several conference titles and national rankings.
    Despite their success, the Bulldogs could not play in the NCAA national championship due to an unwritten rule prohibiting all-white Mississippi collegiate athletic teams from competing against integrated teams. Mississippi State's president, its head basketball coach and their players ultimately risked their safety and their futures by defying this rule not to mention the governor and state legislature in pursuit of a national championship. This award-winning doc recounts the 1962-1963 season and the events leading up to the team eventually playing in the tournament against the integrated Loyola University (Chicago) club. It concludes with a return trip to Loyola, where the former players from those teams reunite and celebrate the landmark game they participated in 50 years earlier.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 1:00 pm
    Local USA [#114] Hunger In America Food insecurities and portraits of the hungry in America; the ironic story of Californian farmers who don't have enough to eat; a suburban Chicago family feeling the economic pinch at the dinner table; and big city food deserts. duration 27:09   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 pm
    Local USA [#113] Drive Like A Girl This documentary follows New York's champion all-girls robotics team, The Iron Maidens, just one year after they beat more than 60 male-dominated teams in a regional competition. Though they advanced to the national stage in Atlanta, GA, they lost before winning it all. Now, they've returned for another shot at the title. They had six weeks to design, program and build a robot alongside their brother team and one of their competitors, the Sciborgs. The struggles they face reveal what it takes to be a group of girls excelling at a boys' game and their successes are a glimpse at the changing roles of females in science and technology. duration 26:41   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 pm
    Newsline [#5052] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 2:30 pm
    Journal [#10115] duration 28:10   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 pm
    Tavis Smiley [#3221] Tavis talks with Rep. Xavier Becerra, chair of the House Democratic Caucus, and 10-year-old Jersey Vargas - a real-life face behind immigration statistics. The California congressman - co-sponsor of the bill known as HR15 - and the pint-sized activist weigh in on US immigration policy and the impact on families. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:30 pm
    Nightly Business Report [#33115] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#10947] FIGHT FOR CONTROL - Iraq's second largest city, Mosul, has been partially overrun by Islamic militants. Judy Woodruff looks into the uprising, which has displaced thousands of civilians.
    PRESIDENTIAL PITCH? - Hillary Clinton's latest memoir, "Hard Choices, " and the promotional campaign surrounding it are both being scrutinized for signs of what a Clinton presidential campaign platform might look like in 2016. For more on the rollout, Gwen Ifill sits down with Clinton advisor Ann Lewis, Democratic strategist Chris Lehane and New York Times national political reporter Amy Chozick. < br>MEDICAID EXPANSION - The latest state to grab headlines in the battle over the federal healthcare law is Virginia, where the resignation of a state senator puts the state's Medicaid expansion in jeopardy. Judy Woodruff analyzes the implications of former Senator Phillip Puckett's resignation with Julie Rovner, Senior Correspondent for Kaiser Health News.
    TEACHER TENURE - Teachers unions lost a major court case in California today. The case has been watched around the country for its impact on hiring and firing public school teachers. Gwen Ifill leads a discussion on state tenure protections and the background surrounding the trial.
    HANDS ON PRESERVATION - Across the country, there's a new effort underway to connect younger generations with America's cherished historic places. Jeffrey Brown reports on a youth development initiative in Shenandoah Valley for his ongoing series, Culture at Risk.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 pm
    Nightly Business Report [#33115] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:30 pm
    Democracy Now! [#3227] duration 59:00   STEREO TVRE
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Newsline [#5052] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3617H] duration 1:00  
  • 7:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#10947] FIGHT FOR CONTROL - Iraq's second largest city, Mosul, has been partially overrun by Islamic militants. Judy Woodruff looks into the uprising, which has displaced thousands of civilians.
    PRESIDENTIAL PITCH? - Hillary Clinton's latest memoir, "Hard Choices, " and the promotional campaign surrounding it are both being scrutinized for signs of what a Clinton presidential campaign platform might look like in 2016. For more on the rollout, Gwen Ifill sits down with Clinton advisor Ann Lewis, Democratic strategist Chris Lehane and New York Times national political reporter Amy Chozick. < br>MEDICAID EXPANSION - The latest state to grab headlines in the battle over the federal healthcare law is Virginia, where the resignation of a state senator puts the state's Medicaid expansion in jeopardy. Judy Woodruff analyzes the implications of former Senator Phillip Puckett's resignation with Julie Rovner, Senior Correspondent for Kaiser Health News.
    TEACHER TENURE - Teachers unions lost a major court case in California today. The case has been watched around the country for its impact on hiring and firing public school teachers. Gwen Ifill leads a discussion on state tenure protections and the background surrounding the trial.
    HANDS ON PRESERVATION - Across the country, there's a new effort underway to connect younger generations with America's cherished historic places. Jeffrey Brown reports on a youth development initiative in Shenandoah Valley for his ongoing series, Culture at Risk.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:57 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3617H] duration 1:00  
  • 8:00 pm
    Charlie Rose [#20122] (original broadcast date: 6/10/14)
    An hour with Lloyd Blankfein, Chairman and CEO of Goldman Sachs.
    duration 56:47   STEREO TVRE
  • 8:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3617H] duration 1:00  
  • 9:00 pm
    Tavis Smiley [#3222Z] Tavis talks with 4-time Emmy winner Allison Janney. The award-winning actress discusses her roles in her latest - and very different - projects: CBS' comedy, Mom, and the Showtime drama series, Masters of Sex. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:28 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3617H] duration 1:00  
  • 9:30 pm
    Roadtrip Nation [#1005H] No More What If's Leaving Houston, the team takes a brief hiatus from interviews with a 2-day drive to Chicago that allows them to reflect on the experience thus far. Once in the Windy City, they find themselves speaking with Zach Kaplan, the CEO and Co-founder of Inventables, a company that connects product developers with novel materials. Zach recounts the many rejections he's been dealt over the years, emphasizing perseverance in the face of challenge. Next, the team heads to Chicagoland Skydive to meet with skydiving instructor Ward Hessig. Once a policeman on track to becoming a lawyer, Ward discusses the fortuitous turn of events that led to his shift in paths. After their chat, the Roadtrippers nervously prepare for a skydive, but are ultimately able to let go of trepidation by following Ward's advice to 'push through fear and embrace the reward.' duration 26:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 9:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3617H] duration 1:00  
  • 10:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#10947] FIGHT FOR CONTROL - Iraq's second largest city, Mosul, has been partially overrun by Islamic militants. Judy Woodruff looks into the uprising, which has displaced thousands of civilians.
    PRESIDENTIAL PITCH? - Hillary Clinton's latest memoir, "Hard Choices, " and the promotional campaign surrounding it are both being scrutinized for signs of what a Clinton presidential campaign platform might look like in 2016. For more on the rollout, Gwen Ifill sits down with Clinton advisor Ann Lewis, Democratic strategist Chris Lehane and New York Times national political reporter Amy Chozick. < br>MEDICAID EXPANSION - The latest state to grab headlines in the battle over the federal healthcare law is Virginia, where the resignation of a state senator puts the state's Medicaid expansion in jeopardy. Judy Woodruff analyzes the implications of former Senator Phillip Puckett's resignation with Julie Rovner, Senior Correspondent for Kaiser Health News.
    TEACHER TENURE - Teachers unions lost a major court case in California today. The case has been watched around the country for its impact on hiring and firing public school teachers. Gwen Ifill leads a discussion on state tenure protections and the background surrounding the trial.
    HANDS ON PRESERVATION - Across the country, there's a new effort underway to connect younger generations with America's cherished historic places. Jeffrey Brown reports on a youth development initiative in Shenandoah Valley for his ongoing series, Culture at Risk.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:57 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3617H] duration 1:00  
  • 11:00 pm
    Democracy Now! [#3227] duration 59:00   STEREO TVRE
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10947] FIGHT FOR CONTROL - Iraq's second largest city, Mosul, has been partially overrun by Islamic militants. Judy Woodruff looks into the uprising, which has displaced thousands of civilians.
    PRESIDENTIAL PITCH? - Hillary Clinton's latest memoir, "Hard Choices, " and the promotional campaign surrounding it are both being scrutinized for signs of what a Clinton presidential campaign platform might look like in 2016. For more on the rollout, Gwen Ifill sits down with Clinton advisor Ann Lewis, Democratic strategist Chris Lehane and New York Times national political reporter Amy Chozick. < br>MEDICAID EXPANSION - The latest state to grab headlines in the battle over the federal healthcare law is Virginia, where the resignation of a state senator puts the state's Medicaid expansion in jeopardy. Judy Woodruff analyzes the implications of former Senator Phillip Puckett's resignation with Julie Rovner, Senior Correspondent for Kaiser Health News.
    TEACHER TENURE - Teachers unions lost a major court case in California today. The case has been watched around the country for its impact on hiring and firing public school teachers. Gwen Ifill leads a discussion on state tenure protections and the background surrounding the trial.
    HANDS ON PRESERVATION - Across the country, there's a new effort underway to connect younger generations with America's cherished historic places. Jeffrey Brown reports on a youth development initiative in Shenandoah Valley for his ongoing series, Culture at Risk.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
Tuesday, June 10, 2014

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TV Technical Issues

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    TV Technical Issues
    • KQED all channels, planned overnight maintenance: early Fri 12/19 midnight-6am

      (this includes all DT9, DT54 and DT25 channels, along with all paid services) We will be doing upgrade and maintenance work in our Master Control area during the overnight hours of late Thurs/early Fri 12/19. Work will begin shortly after midnight early Friday, which may last until 6am, though we hope to finish earlier. This […]

    • KQED Plus OTA ? Optimistically planned maintenance: Fri 12/05 mid-morning

      (DT54.1 thru 54.5) Assuming that the weather and road conditions permit, we plan to do a bit of maintenance on our KQEH transmitter the morning of Friday 12/05… hopefully 10am-11am-ish, but could be a bit later. Most of the work should not affect the outgoing signal, but there will need to be a cable swap […]

    • Mon 11/03/14: Work on KQED Plus tower (DT54)

      Another station needs to do maintenance on its equipment on the tower on Monument Peak, requiring that we switch our DT54 Over the Air signal from the main antenna to the auxiliary when the work starts, then back to the main antenna at the conclusion. These switches should cause momentary outages only, and most receivers […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

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Channels 9.1, 54.2 & 25.1 - Monterey (KQET)
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KQED Life
Channel 54.3
XFINITY 189

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XFINITY 190

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XFINITY 191 & 621

24-hour national Spanish-language network

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KQED Kids
Channel 54.4
XFINITY 192

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