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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Sunday, April 27, 2014

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Sunday, April 27, 2014
  • 12:00 am
    America Reframed [#206] Plagues and Pleasures on the Salton Sea Once known as the California Riviera, the Salton Sea is now called one of America's worst ecological disasters: a fetid, stagnant, salty lake, that coughs up dead fish and birds by the thousands in frequent die-offs that occur. However, amongst the ruins of this man-made mistake, a few remaining eccentrics (a roadside nudist, a religious folk artist, a Hungarian revolutionary, and real estate speculators) struggle to keep a remodeled version of the original Salton Sea dream alive. Accidentally created by an engineering error in 1905, reworked in the 50's as a world class vacation destination for the rich and famous, suddenly abandoned after a series of hurricanes, floods, and fish die-offs, and finally almost saved by Congressman Sonny Bono, the Salton Sea has a bittersweet past. The film shares these people's stories and their difficulties in keeping their unique community alive, as the nearby cities of Los Angeles and San Diego attempt to take the agricultural water run-off that barely sustains the Salton Sea. While covering the historical, economic, political, and environmental issues that face the Sea, this program offers an offbeat portrait of the peculiar and individualistic people who populate its shores. It is an epic western tale of fantastic real estate ventures and failed boomtowns, inner-city gangs fleeing to white small town America, and the subjective notion of success and failure amidst the ruins of the past. duration 1:26:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Native Waters: A Chitimacha Recollection The Chitimacha, the 1000-member tribe known as "the People of Many Waters," are heirs to an unbroken 8000-year past. Living off the bounty of Louisiana's Atchafalaya Basin, one of the richest inland estuaries on the continent, this indigenous nation persists and rejuvenates its culture despite gradually losing its ancestral territory to environmental and man-made forces. This program journeys into sacred places of the Atchafalaya Basin with author Roger Stouff, the son of the last chief of the Chitimacha Indians and a keeper of his family's oral tradition. Stouff shares native stories, beliefs and perspectives about this often overlooked people. An avid fly-fisherman, Stouff laments the certain demise of the river basin, the depletion of its sacred fishing and hunting grounds and the painful "vanishings" of the time-honored Chitimacha way of life. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Teaching Channel Presents [#305] Experiential Learning Go to four amazing classrooms where the focus is on "learning by doing." Whether students are creating radio shows, fixing computers, or solving engineering problems, they are getting a "college and career-ready experience. duration 59:00   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Moyers & Company [#316H] Putting The Freeze On Global Warming Divestment - the selling off of stocks and other investments in the name of an urgent cause - played an enormously successful role in helping to bring down the white supremacist, apartheid regime of South Africa. Now, leaders of the movement fighting against the looming catastrophe of global warming - including students on more than 300 American college campuses nationwide - are using the same tactic to persuade investors to take their money out of fossil fuel companies. Foundations, faith groups, pension funds, municipalities and universities are being urged to take the lead; to sell their shares in the polluting industries burning up the earth and reinvest in companies committed to climate change solutions.
    This week, Bill talks with two who helped inspire the new divestment movement. Ellen Dorsey is executive director of the Wallace Global Fund and a catalyst in the coalition of seventeen foundations known as Divest-Invest Philanthropy. Thomas Van Dyck is senior vice president/financial advisor of RBC Wealth Management, and founder and chair of the shareholder advocacy foundation, As You Sow.
    "The primary driver behind the campaign is our belief in the urgency of the climate change issue and the impact that it will have," Ellen Dorsey tells Moyers. "Cataclysmic impacts will only accelerate in the coming years." Thomas van Dyck says, "We are actually going to have to react prior to experiencing the full consequences. We must remember, nature bats last. And we have to react before that happens. "
    Dorsey notes that the fossil fuel industry "is driving the problem, it is funding denial of the problem. It is refusing to advance safe and clean alternatives. And it's shutting down the policy process with campaign contributions and lobbying. And so by putting the target on the fossil fuel industry, the goal is not to have an immediate economic impact on the fossil fuel industry but to isolate it as a moral pariah like apartheid, like tobacco."
    Thomas Van Dyck adds, "There's a solution. Invest in the clean tech broadly defined and the solutions that can help bring out a sustainable economy, a sustainable and just economy for the world. So it's not only just divest. There's actually a place to go with the money."
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 am
    Asia Insight [#131] duration 28:03   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5343H] * The main focus of President Obama's 4-nation tour of Asia this week was to reassure allies that America remains committed to bolstering security and economic ties to the region. With the backdrop of recent tensions in Japan, South Korea, Malaysia and the Philippines over China's growing assertiveness and the nuclear threat posed by North Korea, Doyle McManus of the Los Angeles Times will examine the president's efforts to reinvigorate US foreign policy in the region.
    * Israel broke off peace negotiations with the Palestinian Authority on Thursday after two main rival Palestinian groups, Fatah and Hamas, signed a surprise reconciliation deal that includes plans for a unity government. Indira Lakshmanan of Bloomberg News will take a closer look at Israel's decision to suspend Middle East peace talks because it - along with the US and European Union - view the Islamist Hamas group as a terrorist organization.
    * At the Supreme Court this week, the justices upheld Michigan's ban on race-based affirmative action policies to promote diversity at public universities. Joan Biskupic of Reuters will examine the impact of the decision as well as two cases argued before the court: a challenge to a state law that prohibits false statements in political campaigns; and whether an upstart venture can legally redirect television signals to portable devises without paying rights fees to broadcasters.
    * Plus, Carrie Johnson of NPR will explain what's behind the Justice Department's plans to make thousands of non-violent, federal prisoners eligible for presidential grants of clemency.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3218H] TOPICS: President Obama's Asian Pivot; Affirmative Action Dealt a Blow. PANELISTS: Pat Buchanan, Author and Columnist; Eleanor Clift, The Daily Beast; Mort Zuckerman, US News & World Report; David Rennie, The Economist. duration 27:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:00 am
    Charlie Rose - The Week [#141] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:30 am
    Focus On Europe [#3217] Who Will Grab The Exhibiting Crimean Gold? UKRAINE/NETHERLANDS: DISPUTE OVER ANCIENT GOLD - After the political and military upheaval over Crimea, the peninsula's cultural heritage is also at stake. The first bone of contention is an exhibition in the Netherlands. It's called the Golden Peninsula in the Black Sea. Viewed historically, Crimea is a fascinating place. For millennia, it was home to nomadic tribes such as the Scythians. They left behind valuable gold artifacts, which are currently on show in a large exhibition in Amsterdam. The gold treasure actually belongs to 4 Crimean museums, but since the peninsula's annexation by Russia, the question has arisen: to whom should the gold artifacts be returned - Ukraine or Crimea - or should they remain in Amsterdam?
    SLOVAKIA: OVERCROWDED SCHOOLS - In eastern Slovakia, the number of school pupils is rising so dramatically that classes are being taught in 2 shifts. Most of the pupils belong to the country's Roma minority. It's financial need that is driving many Roma families in Slovakia to send their children to school regularly. At the beginning of March, the government drastically cut its welfare and family benefit payments. The measures have hit Roma families with many children especially hard. Scarcely any of them have secure paid jobs, and many of them depend on allowances for school children. But the government pays that only to socially disadvantaged families whose children actually attend school.
    SPAIN: PROTESTS AGAINST ABORTION LAW - Spain's governing party is tightening restrictions on women's rights to abortion. The new law is fiercely disputed, because it virtually amounts to an abortion ban. For many women, Spain's current abortion law was an important step on the road to emancipation. Until now, women could decide freely whether or not to have an abortion during the first 14 weeks of pregnancy. That's the case in most European countries. But in future, abortions would be allowed only in cases of rape or severe fetal abnormality. Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy's conservative Partido Popular, or Popular Party, says that in scaling back the right to abortion, it's fulfilling one of its election promises.
    ITALY: VENETIAN SEPARATISTS - They're demanding the independence of the Veneto region from the rest of Italy, and increasingly using violence: the radical separatists from the group known as "The Alliance." The Veneto is one of Italy's wealthiest regions. But since the economic crisis, many people there are angry that their money is being spent to help the poorer south of the country. That's grist to the mill for the separatists, who are becoming increasingly radical. Recently the Italian police broke up a group which had acquired weapons from the Albanian mafia and planned to declare Venetian independence on St. Mark's Square.
    duration 26:10   STEREO TVG
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    America Reframed [#206] Plagues and Pleasures on the Salton Sea Once known as the California Riviera, the Salton Sea is now called one of America's worst ecological disasters: a fetid, stagnant, salty lake, that coughs up dead fish and birds by the thousands in frequent die-offs that occur. However, amongst the ruins of this man-made mistake, a few remaining eccentrics (a roadside nudist, a religious folk artist, a Hungarian revolutionary, and real estate speculators) struggle to keep a remodeled version of the original Salton Sea dream alive. Accidentally created by an engineering error in 1905, reworked in the 50's as a world class vacation destination for the rich and famous, suddenly abandoned after a series of hurricanes, floods, and fish die-offs, and finally almost saved by Congressman Sonny Bono, the Salton Sea has a bittersweet past. The film shares these people's stories and their difficulties in keeping their unique community alive, as the nearby cities of Los Angeles and San Diego attempt to take the agricultural water run-off that barely sustains the Salton Sea. While covering the historical, economic, political, and environmental issues that face the Sea, this program offers an offbeat portrait of the peculiar and individualistic people who populate its shores. It is an epic western tale of fantastic real estate ventures and failed boomtowns, inner-city gangs fleeing to white small town America, and the subjective notion of success and failure amidst the ruins of the past. duration 1:26:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:30 am
    Native Waters: A Chitimacha Recollection The Chitimacha, the 1000-member tribe known as "the People of Many Waters," are heirs to an unbroken 8000-year past. Living off the bounty of Louisiana's Atchafalaya Basin, one of the richest inland estuaries on the continent, this indigenous nation persists and rejuvenates its culture despite gradually losing its ancestral territory to environmental and man-made forces. This program journeys into sacred places of the Atchafalaya Basin with author Roger Stouff, the son of the last chief of the Chitimacha Indians and a keeper of his family's oral tradition. Stouff shares native stories, beliefs and perspectives about this often overlooked people. An avid fly-fisherman, Stouff laments the certain demise of the river basin, the depletion of its sacred fishing and hunting grounds and the painful "vanishings" of the time-honored Chitimacha way of life. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:00 am
    Asia Insight [#131] duration 28:03   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1044] Small Company Stock Pioneer Chuck Royce In a WT exclusive, Great Investor Charles "Chuck" Royce (Director of Investments, Portfolio Manager, The Royce Funds) warns us not to read too much into recent super-sized stock returns, particularly off the 2009 market lows. He predicts quality companies will once again lead over speculative ones and active managers to overtake passive index strategies. This small cap pioneer, for one, has been doing that for decades. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 am
    Truth About Money with Ric Edelman [#308H] Financial advisor Ric Edelman derails one couple's idea about making changes to retirement investments. Robots are in our future, but will they be a benefit to mankind? Ric talks to astronaut Dan Barry to find out what robots may be doing in the future. And Jean Edelman says money can't buy happiness. But a smile is Priceless. All that and so much more on this edition of The Truth about Money with Ric Edelman. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:30 am
    This American Land [#303] Prairie Chickens and Bog Turtles, Watershed Filtering, Bycatch Survival Maintaining extensive tracts of open, well-managed prairie is critical to the conservation of greater prairie chickens, a species of grouse found in parts of 10 states. In Kansas, where 97 percent of the land is privately owned, ranchers are the most important stewards of the prairies, and they get assistance from the Natural Resources Conservation Service to clear their land of invasive trees like the eastern red cedar, improving grassland habitat for prairie chickens as well as for cattle. A similar program helps landowners protect wetland habitat for threatened bog turtles in Delaware and other areas on the East Coast. In an Oregon high school, students design and develop a "bioswale", a strip of land with plants that filter silt, oil and grime out of the runoff from the school's parking lot - "hands-on" learning about pollution, watershed management and environmental impacts. Off the coast of San Diego, marine biologists test a new device for increasing the survival rate of fish caught as bycatch by sport fishermen. Entered in a competition sponsored by the World Wildlife Fund, the SeaQualizer is proving effective as a solution to the problem of barotrauma with bottom-dwelling fish that are released at the surface as bycatch. The expanded bladder prevents the fish from returning to their original depth when released at the surface as bycatch, and mortality is very high. The SeaQualizer employs a non-invasive method of returning fish to depth and is highly effective at increasing the survival rate. "If it can't bite you, it's not interesting," laughs Mississippi State University biologist David Ray, who does very interesting studies on alligators, crocodiles, bats, and flies, among other creatures. Mapping alligator and crocodile genomes is helping scientists with everything from trying to save the odd-looking Indian gharial, to tracing the links between modern reptiles, dinosaurs, and birds. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 10:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3218H] TOPICS: President Obama's Asian Pivot; Affirmative Action Dealt a Blow. PANELISTS: Pat Buchanan, Author and Columnist; Eleanor Clift, The Daily Beast; Mort Zuckerman, US News & World Report; David Rennie, The Economist. duration 27:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5343H] * The main focus of President Obama's 4-nation tour of Asia this week was to reassure allies that America remains committed to bolstering security and economic ties to the region. With the backdrop of recent tensions in Japan, South Korea, Malaysia and the Philippines over China's growing assertiveness and the nuclear threat posed by North Korea, Doyle McManus of the Los Angeles Times will examine the president's efforts to reinvigorate US foreign policy in the region.
    * Israel broke off peace negotiations with the Palestinian Authority on Thursday after two main rival Palestinian groups, Fatah and Hamas, signed a surprise reconciliation deal that includes plans for a unity government. Indira Lakshmanan of Bloomberg News will take a closer look at Israel's decision to suspend Middle East peace talks because it - along with the US and European Union - view the Islamist Hamas group as a terrorist organization.
    * At the Supreme Court this week, the justices upheld Michigan's ban on race-based affirmative action policies to promote diversity at public universities. Joan Biskupic of Reuters will examine the impact of the decision as well as two cases argued before the court: a challenge to a state law that prohibits false statements in political campaigns; and whether an upstart venture can legally redirect television signals to portable devises without paying rights fees to broadcasters.
    * Plus, Carrie Johnson of NPR will explain what's behind the Justice Department's plans to make thousands of non-violent, federal prisoners eligible for presidential grants of clemency.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    KQED NEWSROOM [#125H] Cellphone Searches, S.F. Mayor Ed Lee and Brian Copeland's "Not a Genuine Black Man"
    U.S. Supreme Court On Cellphone Searches By Law Enforcement
    In a collision of the law and technology, the U.S. Supreme Court will on Tuesday hear arguments stemming from two cases, one in California, about whether police should be able to conduct warrantless searches of cellphone contents after an arrest. Law enforcement officials say it helps to solve crimes. Civil libertarians and privacy advocates say it violates the 4th amendment's ban on unreasonable searches and seizures. Fifty percent of Americans now carry smartphones loaded with personal data such as text messages, addresses and photos.

    Guests:
    •Professor Rory Little, U.C. Hastings College of the Law
    •Michelle Quinn, San Jose Mercury News

    Further Reporting:
    Are Warrantless Cellphone Searches Constitutional? Court to Decide

    San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee Interview
    Mayor Ed Lee joins Thuy Vu for a discussion about some of the accomplishments and challenges for San Francisco, which include a tech boom, skyrocketing housing prices, the struggle for City College of San Francisco to maintain its accreditation, pedestrian and bike rider safety on the streets, a new plan for a Warriors arena at Mission Bay, and political corruption.

    Further Reporting:
    Ed Lee on Forum: Tech Workers Have the Same Issues as Everyone Else

    Brian Copeland, "Not A Genuine Black Man"
    Comedian and talk show host Brian Copeland knows how it feels to be an outsider. He grew up in San Leandro during the 1970's the only African American student in his high school class of three hundred fifty. As a kid, he weathered physical abuse from his father, discrimination by local police, and efforts by a racist landlord to evict his family from their apartment. He shaped those experiences into a long-running one man show "Not A Genuine Black Man." The tenth anniversary production opens at Berkeley Rep this week and runs through May. Copeland sat down with Scott Shafer to talk about the show, his comedy, and life on the outside looking in.

    Further Reporting:
    Brian Copeland and Marga Gomez Get Impersonal at The Marsh
    Brian Copeland's New Play Inspired By San Leandro Murders
    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 11:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#316H] Putting The Freeze On Global Warming Divestment - the selling off of stocks and other investments in the name of an urgent cause - played an enormously successful role in helping to bring down the white supremacist, apartheid regime of South Africa. Now, leaders of the movement fighting against the looming catastrophe of global warming - including students on more than 300 American college campuses nationwide - are using the same tactic to persuade investors to take their money out of fossil fuel companies. Foundations, faith groups, pension funds, municipalities and universities are being urged to take the lead; to sell their shares in the polluting industries burning up the earth and reinvest in companies committed to climate change solutions.
    This week, Bill talks with two who helped inspire the new divestment movement. Ellen Dorsey is executive director of the Wallace Global Fund and a catalyst in the coalition of seventeen foundations known as Divest-Invest Philanthropy. Thomas Van Dyck is senior vice president/financial advisor of RBC Wealth Management, and founder and chair of the shareholder advocacy foundation, As You Sow.
    "The primary driver behind the campaign is our belief in the urgency of the climate change issue and the impact that it will have," Ellen Dorsey tells Moyers. "Cataclysmic impacts will only accelerate in the coming years." Thomas van Dyck says, "We are actually going to have to react prior to experiencing the full consequences. We must remember, nature bats last. And we have to react before that happens. "
    Dorsey notes that the fossil fuel industry "is driving the problem, it is funding denial of the problem. It is refusing to advance safe and clean alternatives. And it's shutting down the policy process with campaign contributions and lobbying. And so by putting the target on the fossil fuel industry, the goal is not to have an immediate economic impact on the fossil fuel industry but to isolate it as a moral pariah like apartheid, like tobacco."
    Thomas Van Dyck adds, "There's a solution. Invest in the clean tech broadly defined and the solutions that can help bring out a sustainable economy, a sustainable and just economy for the world. So it's not only just divest. There's actually a place to go with the money."
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1734] INDIA'S INVISIBLE DOMESTICS - From India's impoverished villages, millions of girls and young women flock to the cities - or are forced to go - to find work as domestic servants. Fred de Sam Lazaro reports from New Delhi on the hidden, sometimes almost enslaved workers who endure little legal protection, minimal pay and widespread indifference to their situation and efforts to improve their conditions.
    JERUSALEM THE MOVIE - Reports about Jerusalem often focus on conflicts and tensions. But a stunning new 3D film, Jerusalem, by National Geographic Entertainment, looks instead at the beauty and sacredness of the city. The filmmakers were granted unprecedented access to the city's holiest sites. Jerusalem, which is currently playing in IMAX theaters in the US and around the world, features 3 young women, a Jew, a Muslim and a Christian, who are all from Jerusalem. Kim Lawton spoke with the women during their recent visit to the US. Her report also includes clips from the film.
    CANONIZATION OF POPES JOHN XXIII AND JOHN PAUL II - On Sunday (April 27) at the Vatican, Pope Francis will preside over a double canonization ceremony to elevate Pope John XXIII and Pope John Paul II to sainthood. Bob Abernethy talks with Kim Lawton and Kevin Eckstrom about the legacies of these two new saints and what their canonization means to Catholics and non-Catholics alike.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:30 pm
    QUEST [#710H] Reawakening Extinct Species New genetic technologies are making it possible for scientists to try to bring back extinct species. Meet researcher Ben Novak at the University of California, Santa Cruz, who is working to revive the passenger pigeon, once the most abundant bird in the world, and Harvard Medical School's George Church, who is trying to engineer a woolly mammoth. It may be possible, but is it right to turn back the clock? duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 1:00 pm
    Miller Center's American Forum [#2105] Gilbert King - 2013 Pulitzer Prize Winner on Thurgood Marshall Gilbert King discusses his most recent book, Devil in the Grove: Thurgood Marshall, the Groveland Boys, and the Dawn of a New America, which was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in 2013. Devil in the Grove draws on never-before-published material about the deadliest case of future Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall's career. King has written about the Supreme Court history and the death penalty for The New York Times, The Washington Post, and Smithsonian magazine's history blog "Past Imperfect." duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1303] East Texas Zay Harding takes roping lessons and experiences the famous Gun Show in Ft. Worth, visits the Book Depository with an eyewitness to the Kennedy assassination in Dallas, travels to the oil fields in Kilgore, stops at the Huntsville State Penitentiary, tours the Johnson Space Center with Alan Bean in Houston and celebrates the 4th of July in Chappell Hill. duration 57:31   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 3:00 pm
    Nature [#3110] Snow Monkeys In the frigid valleys of Japan's Shiga Highlands, a troop of snow monkeys make their way and raise their families in a complex society of rank and privilege where each knows their place. Their leader is still new to the job and something of a solitary grouch. But one little monkey, innocently unaware of his own lowly social rank, reaches out to this lonely leader, forming a bond with him that manages over time to warm his less than sunny disposition. It is a rare and remarkable gesture that alters both their lives. Changing seasons bring new babies to care for, a profusion of insects and blossoms to eat, family disagreements to squabble over and tragedies to overcome. Mating season brings competition for females as the days grow shorter and colder in a rush toward winter. But with their now confident leader to guide them and their families to shelter and care for them, this troop of snow monkeys is ready to face the world. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 pm
    Nova [#4110] Inside Animal Minds: Who's The Smartest? What would it be like to go inside the mind of an animal? We have all gazed into a creature's eyes and wondered: what is it thinking about? What does it really know? Now, the revolutionary science of animal cognition is revealing hard evidence about how animals understand the world around them, uncovering their remarkable problem-solving abilities and exploring the complexity of their powers of communication and even their emotions. In this mini-series, Nova explores these breakthroughs through three iconic creatures: dogs, birds and dolphins. We'll travel into the spectacularly nuanced noses of dogs and wolves, and ask whether their reliance on different senses has shaped their evolution. We'll see through the eyes of a starling in flight and test the tool-using skills of the smartest of birds, the crow. We'll listen in as scientists track dolphins in the Caribbean and elephants on the African savannah, trying to unlock the secrets of animal communication. As we discover how researchers are pushing the animal mind to its limits, we'll uncover surprising similarities to - and differences from - the human mind. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 pm
    Your Inner Fish [#103H] Your Inner Monkey Our primate progenitors had bodies a lot like those of modern monkeys and spent tens of millions of years living in trees. From them we inherited our versatile hands, amazing vision and capable brains - but also some less beneficial traits, including our bad backs and terrible sense of smell. duration 55:01   SRND51 TVPG
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour Weekend [#168H] Included: NewsHour Weekend ventures into the complicated histories of Russia and Ukraine to see how centuries-old tensions are playing out in today's politics and rhetoric. That, and the weekend's news, online and on-air. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    KQED NEWSROOM [#125H] Cellphone Searches, S.F. Mayor Ed Lee and Brian Copeland's "Not a Genuine Black Man"
    U.S. Supreme Court On Cellphone Searches By Law Enforcement
    In a collision of the law and technology, the U.S. Supreme Court will on Tuesday hear arguments stemming from two cases, one in California, about whether police should be able to conduct warrantless searches of cellphone contents after an arrest. Law enforcement officials say it helps to solve crimes. Civil libertarians and privacy advocates say it violates the 4th amendment's ban on unreasonable searches and seizures. Fifty percent of Americans now carry smartphones loaded with personal data such as text messages, addresses and photos.

    Guests:
    •Professor Rory Little, U.C. Hastings College of the Law
    •Michelle Quinn, San Jose Mercury News

    Further Reporting:
    Are Warrantless Cellphone Searches Constitutional? Court to Decide

    San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee Interview
    Mayor Ed Lee joins Thuy Vu for a discussion about some of the accomplishments and challenges for San Francisco, which include a tech boom, skyrocketing housing prices, the struggle for City College of San Francisco to maintain its accreditation, pedestrian and bike rider safety on the streets, a new plan for a Warriors arena at Mission Bay, and political corruption.

    Further Reporting:
    Ed Lee on Forum: Tech Workers Have the Same Issues as Everyone Else

    Brian Copeland, "Not A Genuine Black Man"
    Comedian and talk show host Brian Copeland knows how it feels to be an outsider. He grew up in San Leandro during the 1970's the only African American student in his high school class of three hundred fifty. As a kid, he weathered physical abuse from his father, discrimination by local police, and efforts by a racist landlord to evict his family from their apartment. He shaped those experiences into a long-running one man show "Not A Genuine Black Man." The tenth anniversary production opens at Berkeley Rep this week and runs through May. Copeland sat down with Scott Shafer to talk about the show, his comedy, and life on the outside looking in.

    Further Reporting:
    Brian Copeland and Marga Gomez Get Impersonal at The Marsh
    Brian Copeland's New Play Inspired By San Leandro Murders
    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 7:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#316H] Putting The Freeze On Global Warming Divestment - the selling off of stocks and other investments in the name of an urgent cause - played an enormously successful role in helping to bring down the white supremacist, apartheid regime of South Africa. Now, leaders of the movement fighting against the looming catastrophe of global warming - including students on more than 300 American college campuses nationwide - are using the same tactic to persuade investors to take their money out of fossil fuel companies. Foundations, faith groups, pension funds, municipalities and universities are being urged to take the lead; to sell their shares in the polluting industries burning up the earth and reinvest in companies committed to climate change solutions.
    This week, Bill talks with two who helped inspire the new divestment movement. Ellen Dorsey is executive director of the Wallace Global Fund and a catalyst in the coalition of seventeen foundations known as Divest-Invest Philanthropy. Thomas Van Dyck is senior vice president/financial advisor of RBC Wealth Management, and founder and chair of the shareholder advocacy foundation, As You Sow.
    "The primary driver behind the campaign is our belief in the urgency of the climate change issue and the impact that it will have," Ellen Dorsey tells Moyers. "Cataclysmic impacts will only accelerate in the coming years." Thomas van Dyck says, "We are actually going to have to react prior to experiencing the full consequences. We must remember, nature bats last. And we have to react before that happens. "
    Dorsey notes that the fossil fuel industry "is driving the problem, it is funding denial of the problem. It is refusing to advance safe and clean alternatives. And it's shutting down the policy process with campaign contributions and lobbying. And so by putting the target on the fossil fuel industry, the goal is not to have an immediate economic impact on the fossil fuel industry but to isolate it as a moral pariah like apartheid, like tobacco."
    Thomas Van Dyck adds, "There's a solution. Invest in the clean tech broadly defined and the solutions that can help bring out a sustainable economy, a sustainable and just economy for the world. So it's not only just divest. There's actually a place to go with the money."
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:30 pm
    Local USA [#109] Social Media We get social, with social media! Finding the people using social media to change the world. The Chicago painting duo, who use Twitter to reward treasure hunters; documentary cameras hit the streets of Raleigh-Durham, NC, to ask how social media influenced the 2012 presidential election; a look at what happens when an entire generation of Instagram users get together with their cameras on the beaches of Santa Monica, California; and how Facebook helped to make a young Los Angeleno boy's dream come true. duration 27:52   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:00 pm
    Global Voices [#602] Garbage Dreams The world's largest garbage village is just outside Cairo. The "Zabaleen" (Arabic for "garbage people") recycle 80 percent of the trash they collect, but now multinational corporations threaten their livelihood. duration 56:46   STEREO
  • 9:00 pm
    Nature [#3110] Snow Monkeys In the frigid valleys of Japan's Shiga Highlands, a troop of snow monkeys make their way and raise their families in a complex society of rank and privilege where each knows their place. Their leader is still new to the job and something of a solitary grouch. But one little monkey, innocently unaware of his own lowly social rank, reaches out to this lonely leader, forming a bond with him that manages over time to warm his less than sunny disposition. It is a rare and remarkable gesture that alters both their lives. Changing seasons bring new babies to care for, a profusion of insects and blossoms to eat, family disagreements to squabble over and tragedies to overcome. Mating season brings competition for females as the days grow shorter and colder in a rush toward winter. But with their now confident leader to guide them and their families to shelter and care for them, this troop of snow monkeys is ready to face the world. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:00 pm
    Pacific Heartbeat [#304] Na Loea: The Masters This program beautifully depicts the lives of those who are considered masters in Hawaiian culture. It includes two stories: Ancestral Ink features Keone Nunes, a kumu hula (teacher of hula) and master of traditional k?kau (tattooing); The Great Heart of Waiok?ne features Ed Wendt, a pioneer in the taro restoration movement who has helped to re-establish the water rights for all traditional farmers in east Maui. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 11:00 pm
    Global Voices [#414] The Siege A powerful documentary on the infamous 1996 siege in Lima. The Tupac Amaru Revolutionary Movement (MRTA), lead by Nestor Cerpa, storms a party at the Japanese Ambassador's residence, taking hundreds of hostages and demanding the release of MRTA members from prison, including Cerpa's wife. President Alberto Fujimori's response is uncompromising and fatal. With unprecedented access to archival footage, police recordings, and key interviews, the film documents 4 extraordinary months as the siege builds to an astonishing conclusion. duration 1:20:30   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:30 am
    Serving America: Memories of Peace Corps This program highlights the experiences of some of the nearly 3000 volunteers who served during the early years of the Peace Corps. A mix of archival film and photographs, along with personal stories from former volunteers, tells a story of service and idealism. Interviews convey the volunteers' passion, commitment and bravery as they lived and worked in developing countries, including South and Central America, Africa and the Middle East. From almost fatal obstacles to spiritual epiphanies, these men and women describe their transformative experiences. Donna Shalala, former US Secretary of Health and Human Services (1993-2001), recounts the adventure of serving in Iran between 1962 and 1964. "What the Peace Corps really did is make me a citizen of the world," says Shalala. duration 26:44   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
Sunday, April 27, 2014

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TV Technical Issues

TV
    TV Technical Issues
    • Mon 11/03/14: Work on KQED Plus tower (DT54)

      Another station needs to do maintenance on its equipment on the tower on Monument Peak, requiring that we switch our DT54 Over the Air signal from the main antenna to the auxiliary when the work starts, then back to the main antenna at the conclusion. These switches should cause momentary outages only, and most receivers […]

    • Wed 10/15 morning: KQED Plus (KQEH) Over the Air signal down

      UPDATE: This problem has been resolved, and the OTA signal for the DT54 channels restored. (DT54.1 through 54.5) KQED Plus’ Over the Air transmission is currently off air via our KQEH transmitter on Monument Peak northeast of San Jose. Technicians are working on the problem. No current estimate regarding how long this will exist. We […]

    • KQET (DT25) Over the Air: Wed 8/27

      We are aware of the break-up issues for our DT25 Over the Air signal in the Monterey/Salinas area. This will also affect viewers of any cable or satellite signal provider using that transmitter as their source. Engineers are working on the problem.

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Channels 9.1, 54.2 & 25.1 - Monterey (KQET)
XFINITY 9 and HD 709

All widescreen and HD programs

KQED Plus

KQED +
Channels 54, 54.1, 9.2 & 25.2 - Monterey
XFINITY 10 and HD 2710

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life
Channel 54.3
XFINITY 189

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Channel 9.3
XFINITY 190

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Channel 54.5 & 25.3
XFINITY 191 & 621

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Channel 54.4
XFINITY 192

Quality children's programming parents love too