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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Saturday, April 12, 2014

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, April 12, 2014
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10905] * Markets * Humanitarian crisis * Common Core * Shields & Brook * Where poetry lives duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#33073] Tonight on Nightly Business, is the bull market still alive? After a wild week on Wall Street, see what one market watcher says you should do with your money now. And, shares of JPMorgan drop after a disappointing earnings report. Where does the stock head from here? duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#3179] Tavis talks with award-winning sociologist Katherine Newman. 20 years after the fall of apartheid and the first free elections in South Africa, Newman takes a look at the country today and discusses her text, After Freedom. Tavis also chats with internationally acclaimed Iranian composer Hafez Nazeri. The young Iranian-born composer, multi-instrumentalist and vocalist talks about his pioneering and innovative music. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Independent Lens [#1318] When The Drum Is Beating For 60 years, Haiti's most popular band, Septentrional, has survived corrupt governments, revolutions, natural disasters, extreme poverty and national tragedy. Its joyous fusion of Cuban and Haitian beats lifts and celebrates the indomitable Haitian spirit. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG-V (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1732] SEVERELY IMPAIRED PREMATURE BABIES - Technology has allowed premature and critically ill newborn babies to survive, but sometimes with major problems. Dr. John Lantos, Ethicist at Children's Mercy Hospital in Kansas City, says, "The big question today is, of the survivors, how many survive without devastating neurologic impairments or other chronic medical problems." Betty Rollin speaks with physicians, families and a chaplain at Children's Mercy's Intensive Care unit about wrestling with issues of life and death. < br>THE SARAJEVO HAGGADAH - Beginning sundown April 14th, Jews will be observing Passover with the Seder, the special meal which commemorates their ancestors' exodus from slavery in Egypt. The book that guides the ritual is the Haggadah. Kim Lawton reports on one of the most famous Haggadahs in the world, the Sarajevo Haggadah, named for the Bosnian city where it is now kept. The rare, beautifully illuminated manuscript was created more than 600 years ago in Spain, and many see its story as a compelling symbol of the Exodus. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1042] Fundamental Differences This week's WT asks: is there such thing as a better mouse trap? "Financial Thought Leader" Robert Arnott, chairman of Research Affiliates, says he has created a better alternative to traditional index funds with his fundamental index approach. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2305H] * Why Women Don't Vote for Women * Stay-at-Home Moms on the Rise * Women Vets and Jobs
    Panelists: The Heritage Foundation's Jennifer Marshall, The Daily Mail's Francesca Chambers, The Gender Equality Project's Megan Beyer, Progressive Commentator Patricia Sosa.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    Asian Voices [#301] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    Survival: Lives in the Balance [#103] The Plant That Cures Malaria (Uganda) Malaria threatens half of the world's population. Malaria killed Clovis's young daughter. Clovis learned too late that, if caught early, a three-day course of drugs easily cures malaria. The drug is called Coartem. The main ingredient is Arteminisin, a chemical extracted from the Artemisia plant. The drug is expensive. Most developing countries cannot afford to buy enough to meet the needs of their people. Clovis discovered he can easily grow Artemisia on his farm in Uganda. He has invested much of his family's resources into farming the plant. He's created a community of small farmers that can produce enough Artemisia to sell it in bulk to a processing company. A new company policy, however, may stand in the way of income for this cooperative of farmers. duration 50:30   STEREO TVPG
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    Survival: Lives in the Balance [#104] Fit for Life (Bangladesh) A young woman - just a girl, really - is crouching on the floor of her family's house. She's in labor. She isn't being whisked away to a hospital to give birth. This is rural Bangladesh. She's going to have her baby at home, just like over 90% of mothers in Bangladesh. A dhai is at her side, a woman with no medical training, yet she has delivered most of the children in this village. Her tools are a razor blade and a string to tie off the umbilical cord. In different village, another young woman gives birth in a clinic with the aid of trained medical professionals. A health specialist had coached her through her pregnancy, and will visit the family during the first weeks of the baby's infancy. This child and her mother stand a much better chance of surviving birth and the first year of life. duration 50:35   STEREO TVPG
  • 7:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1732] SEVERELY IMPAIRED PREMATURE BABIES - Technology has allowed premature and critically ill newborn babies to survive, but sometimes with major problems. Dr. John Lantos, Ethicist at Children's Mercy Hospital in Kansas City, says, "The big question today is, of the survivors, how many survive without devastating neurologic impairments or other chronic medical problems." Betty Rollin speaks with physicians, families and a chaplain at Children's Mercy's Intensive Care unit about wrestling with issues of life and death. < br>THE SARAJEVO HAGGADAH - Beginning sundown April 14th, Jews will be observing Passover with the Seder, the special meal which commemorates their ancestors' exodus from slavery in Egypt. The book that guides the ritual is the Haggadah. Kim Lawton reports on one of the most famous Haggadahs in the world, the Sarajevo Haggadah, named for the Bosnian city where it is now kept. The rare, beautifully illuminated manuscript was created more than 600 years ago in Spain, and many see its story as a compelling symbol of the Exodus. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#314H] Fighting for the Four Freedoms In January 1941, less than a year before Pearl Harbor and America's entry into World War II, President Franklin D. Roosevelt's State of the Union address made it clear that a fight was inevitable, a fight to preserve, protect and defend four essential freedoms: freedom of speech and religion and freedom from want and fear.
    This week, historian Harvey J. Kaye, author of the new book, The Fight for the Four Freedoms: What Made FDR and the Greatest Generation Truly Great, talks with Bill Moyers about FDR's speech and how it was the cornerstone for the kind of progressive society Roosevelt hoped for but did not live to see at war's end.
    Today, the Four Freedoms have been diminished and defiled by a society that gives money and power the strongest voice. Kaye says, "Look what we've done and look what we're allowing to happen now. This cannot be the America that I imagined and most of my fellow Americans imagined."
    But, he continues, Americans "Have not forgotten the Four Freedoms as ideals. They have forgotten what it takes to realize them, that we must defend, sustain and secure democracy by enhancing it. That's what Roosevelt knew. That's what Jefferson knew. And no one seems to remember that today. That's what we have to remind people of.
    "We need to remember that we're the children and the grandchildren of the generation that beat the Great Depression and defeated fascism and imperialism in World War II and went on to create the strongest and most prosperous country in human history. And how did they do that? By making America freer, more equal and more democratic."
    Harvey J. Kaye is the Ben and Joyce Rosenberg Professor of Democracy and Justice Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay and director of the school's Center for History and Social Change.
    The broadcast concludes with a Bill Moyers essay remembering his father's reaction to FDR's death, 69 years ago this week.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 8:00 am
    LinkAsia [#242] duration 26:46   STEREO
  • 8:30 am
    This American Land [#301] Critical Aquifer, Trout in the Classroom, Grizzlies Return, Dragonflies Underneath the Great Plains, the Ogallala Aquifer holds a vast expanse of prehistoric water reserves, a vital source of moisture and a key asset for America's agricultural economy. But the Ogallala is now threatened by overuse in places like the Texas Panhandle, where farmers and ranchers now work with advisers from the Natural Resources Conservation Service to find ways to maximize their efficiency in irrigation and protect their water for future generations. Students in the Sierras in California help to restore threatened Lahontan cutthroat trout by raising the fish from eggs and releasing them in an approved trout stream; in the process, they learn about the life cycle of the fish, its value as a native species in the local ecosystem, and how invasive fish are crowding it out of its habitat. Students also learn how to monitor water quality and raise awareness about protecting native trout streams. In the Yellowstone Ecosystem, grizzly bears have made a dramatic recovery since they were federally listed in 1975 as a threatened species in the lower 48 states, increasing from 146 bears at that time to at least 602 in 2010. Grizzlies have reoccupied areas where they had been absent for decades, and are now considered to be at ecological carrying capacity with subadults emigrating to areas outside Yellowstone National Park. In a partnership production with Wyoming's Game and Fish Department, this success story is described by leading bear experts. Just how do dragonflies pull off complex aerial feats, hunting and reproducing in midair? These four-winged insects pre-date dinosaurs and can fly straight up, straight down, or hover like helicopters. Researchers are getting some inspiration from these insects to improve small- scale aircraft design. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:00 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5341H] President Obama and 3 former presidents - Jimmy Carter, Bill Clinton and George W. Bush - commemorated the 50th anniversary of the passage of the Civil Rights Act during a 3-day summit at the Lyndon B. Johnson Presidential Library in Texas this week. The 1964 law prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex or national origin. Time Magazine's Michael Duffy, author of "The Presidents Club," will take a closer look at how the presidents honored President Johnson's landmark legislation and why half a century later they remain focused on the work that remains to be done to address civil rights issues in America. Gwen Ifill explores The Arc of History and the Civil Rights Law in this week's Gwen's Take. < br>Just one day after President Obama signed executive orders strengthening equal pay laws, Senate Republicans blocked a Democrat-sponsored bill aimed at closing the pay gap between men and women. Republicans say they object to the Paycheck Fairness Act because it would lead to government interference and substantial burdens on businesses. Alexis Simendinger of Real Clear Politics will examine the policy and politics at the center of the debate over income inequality.
    Since immigration reform remains stalled on Capitol Hill, advocates are turning their attention to the White House demanding that the president push forward some type of action to address unauthorized immigrants' deportation and detention fears. Fawn Johnson of National Journal will explain why the pressure is mounting on the Obama administration to act before the November midterm elections.
    Plus, Amy Walter of the Cook Political Report will explore the prospective candidacies of Hillary Rodham Clinton and Jeb Bush and the debate over political dynasties.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:30 am
    State of Surveillance A Co-production of KQED & The Center for Investigative Reporting "State of Surveillance" goes inside California police departments where new technologies ranging from automated license plate readers to facial recognition technology are making it easier to fight crime, but are also raising concerns about privacy. Are these monitoring systems becoming dragnets filled with information about law-abiding citizens? duration 27:46   STEREO TVG
  • 10:00 am
    BBC Newsnight [#17101Z] duration 28:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2305H] * Why Women Don't Vote for Women * Stay-at-Home Moms on the Rise * Women Vets and Jobs
    Panelists: The Heritage Foundation's Jennifer Marshall, The Daily Mail's Francesca Chambers, The Gender Equality Project's Megan Beyer, Progressive Commentator Patricia Sosa.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3216H] duration 27:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Charlie Rose - The Week [#139] * IMF managing director Christine Lagarde on her outlook for the economy * Alyssa Mastromonaco, departing deputy Chief of Staff * Mike Allen of Politico on the week in politics * Ukranian pop star and political activist Ruslana Lyzhychko * Director Steven Soderbergh and screenwriter Scott Z. Burns discuss their new play The Library * A look at the film The Railway Man with director Jonathan Teplitzky, actors Jeremy Irvine and Colin Firth, and Patti Lomax, wife of Eric Lomax, on whom the film is based. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#314H] Fighting for the Four Freedoms In January 1941, less than a year before Pearl Harbor and America's entry into World War II, President Franklin D. Roosevelt's State of the Union address made it clear that a fight was inevitable, a fight to preserve, protect and defend four essential freedoms: freedom of speech and religion and freedom from want and fear.
    This week, historian Harvey J. Kaye, author of the new book, The Fight for the Four Freedoms: What Made FDR and the Greatest Generation Truly Great, talks with Bill Moyers about FDR's speech and how it was the cornerstone for the kind of progressive society Roosevelt hoped for but did not live to see at war's end.
    Today, the Four Freedoms have been diminished and defiled by a society that gives money and power the strongest voice. Kaye says, "Look what we've done and look what we're allowing to happen now. This cannot be the America that I imagined and most of my fellow Americans imagined."
    But, he continues, Americans "Have not forgotten the Four Freedoms as ideals. They have forgotten what it takes to realize them, that we must defend, sustain and secure democracy by enhancing it. That's what Roosevelt knew. That's what Jefferson knew. And no one seems to remember that today. That's what we have to remind people of.
    "We need to remember that we're the children and the grandchildren of the generation that beat the Great Depression and defeated fascism and imperialism in World War II and went on to create the strongest and most prosperous country in human history. And how did they do that? By making America freer, more equal and more democratic."
    Harvey J. Kaye is the Ben and Joyce Rosenberg Professor of Democracy and Justice Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay and director of the school's Center for History and Social Change.
    The broadcast concludes with a Bill Moyers essay remembering his father's reaction to FDR's death, 69 years ago this week.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 12:30 pm
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1732] SEVERELY IMPAIRED PREMATURE BABIES - Technology has allowed premature and critically ill newborn babies to survive, but sometimes with major problems. Dr. John Lantos, Ethicist at Children's Mercy Hospital in Kansas City, says, "The big question today is, of the survivors, how many survive without devastating neurologic impairments or other chronic medical problems." Betty Rollin speaks with physicians, families and a chaplain at Children's Mercy's Intensive Care unit about wrestling with issues of life and death. < br>THE SARAJEVO HAGGADAH - Beginning sundown April 14th, Jews will be observing Passover with the Seder, the special meal which commemorates their ancestors' exodus from slavery in Egypt. The book that guides the ritual is the Haggadah. Kim Lawton reports on one of the most famous Haggadahs in the world, the Sarajevo Haggadah, named for the Bosnian city where it is now kept. The rare, beautifully illuminated manuscript was created more than 600 years ago in Spain, and many see its story as a compelling symbol of the Exodus. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 pm
    QUEST [#707H] Sea Otters, New Cars and Old Forests Meet biologists in Washington state exploring the surprising connection between sea otters and climate change; take a test drive in San Francisco with new hydrogen-powered cars that only emit water vapor; and find out how scientists in Wisconsin are working to build a more resilient forest. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 1:30 pm
    BioCentury This Week [#315] duration 25:41   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    Independent Lens [#1219H] Waste Land Brazilian artist Vik Muniz creates portraits of people using found materials from the places where they live and work. His "Sugar Children" series portrays the deprived children of Caribbean plantation workers using the sugar their parents harvest. We meet Muniz as he embarks on his next project, inspired by the trash pickers at the largest landfill on earth. duration 1:26:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 3:30 pm
    Heat and Harvest: Impact of Climate Change On California September 28, 2012 From the vast fields of fruits and nuts in the Central Valley to the waterways of the Sacramento Delta - and many growing centers in between - climate change is beginning to take its toll on California agriculture. According to a recent report commissioned by the state EPA and Energy Commission, yields in key crops are expected to drop significantly over the coming decades as climate change alters key growing conditions.
    The list of crops most directly affected under business as usual conditions, assuming a 2 degree warming by 2050, reads like a walk through a supermarket produce section: yields of citrus crops in the San Joaquin Valley are expected to drop about 18% by 2050; grapes about 6%; cherries and other orchard crops about 9%. But this is not just a look into the state's future. California's farms, often called the nation's breadbasket, are already feeling the effects of the trifecta of converging forces prompted by climate change: shorter cold seasons, longer seasons of extreme heat, and dwindling water supplies.
    This multi-platform collaboration of the Center for Investigative Reporting and KQED's science and environment reporting teams examines how climate change is already playing out in one of California's largest industries. Three documentary reports are woven into one comprehensive program.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 4:00 pm
    Shark Island Whaler: The Real-Life Sequel to Moby Dick Two Brothers was a Nantucket whaleship that sank on the night of February 11, 1823, off the French Frigate Shoals. The ship's captain was George Pollard, Jr., former captain of the famous whaleship Essex. The wreck was discovered in 2008 (announced on February 11, 2011) by a team of marine archaeologists working on an expedition for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in the PapahAe? naumokuAe?kea Marine National Monument. duration 28:45   STEREO TVG
  • 4:30 pm
    Little Manila: Filipinos In California's Heartland Filled with chop suey houses, gambling dens, and dance halls, Little Manila was the area in Stockton notoriously called, Skid Row, but it was also the closest thing Filipinos had to a hometown. In its heyday in the 30s, this lively area had the largest population of Filipinos outside of the Philippines. This program tells the story of Jimmy Ente, Jr., a longtime Stockton resident recruited to work in the asparagus fields. Jimmy, and many other like him, faced backbreaking work, low wages, and at times extreme racism to fulfill their dreams. Narrated by famed Filipino-American producer Dean Devlin, this documentary tells the immigrant story as Filipinos experienced it. duration 26:45   STEREO TVG
  • 5:00 pm
    Through A Dog's Eyes A documentary about remarkable dog trainer Jennifer Arnold, the service dogs she trains and the families whose lives they have changed. Arnold's non-profit organization, Canine Assistants, trains dogs to assist people with a variety of disabilities. Based in part on Arnold's book of the same name, the film also presents the science that explains the amazing dog/human bond and what makes Arnold's training techniques so effective for anyone with a canine in the family. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour Weekend [#163H] Included: Are impoverished people being jailed because they can't afford to pay fines? PBS Newshour Weekend takes an in-depth look at what some are calling the return of the debtor's prison. That, and the weekend's news, online and on-air. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5341H] President Obama and 3 former presidents - Jimmy Carter, Bill Clinton and George W. Bush - commemorated the 50th anniversary of the passage of the Civil Rights Act during a 3-day summit at the Lyndon B. Johnson Presidential Library in Texas this week. The 1964 law prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex or national origin. Time Magazine's Michael Duffy, author of "The Presidents Club," will take a closer look at how the presidents honored President Johnson's landmark legislation and why half a century later they remain focused on the work that remains to be done to address civil rights issues in America. Gwen Ifill explores The Arc of History and the Civil Rights Law in this week's Gwen's Take. < br>Just one day after President Obama signed executive orders strengthening equal pay laws, Senate Republicans blocked a Democrat-sponsored bill aimed at closing the pay gap between men and women. Republicans say they object to the Paycheck Fairness Act because it would lead to government interference and substantial burdens on businesses. Alexis Simendinger of Real Clear Politics will examine the policy and politics at the center of the debate over income inequality.
    Since immigration reform remains stalled on Capitol Hill, advocates are turning their attention to the White House demanding that the president push forward some type of action to address unauthorized immigrants' deportation and detention fears. Fawn Johnson of National Journal will explain why the pressure is mounting on the Obama administration to act before the November midterm elections.
    Plus, Amy Walter of the Cook Political Report will explore the prospective candidacies of Hillary Rodham Clinton and Jeb Bush and the debate over political dynasties.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 pm
    State of Surveillance A Co-production of KQED & The Center for Investigative Reporting "State of Surveillance" goes inside California police departments where new technologies ranging from automated license plate readers to facial recognition technology are making it easier to fight crime, but are also raising concerns about privacy. Are these monitoring systems becoming dragnets filled with information about law-abiding citizens? duration 27:46   STEREO TVG
  • 7:30 pm
    QUEST [#707H] Sea Otters, New Cars and Old Forests Meet biologists in Washington state exploring the surprising connection between sea otters and climate change; take a test drive in San Francisco with new hydrogen-powered cars that only emit water vapor; and find out how scientists in Wisconsin are working to build a more resilient forest. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1301] Myanmar Megan McCormick starts her journey in Yangon with a visit to Shwedagon Pagoda, the most revered Buddhist temple in Myanmar. Next she visits Inle Lake and then heads to the Shan Palace in the town of Hsipaw, where she uncovers a centuries-old tribal rivalry. Megan travels by train to Mandalay to visit the golden Mahamuni Buddha and to try her hand at puppetry. She makes her way to the Chin State and then on to Bagan, once the capital city. Megan's last stop is the Rahkine State where she boards a boat to Ngapali Beach, the ultimate beach destination. duration 58:04   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 9:00 pm
    Nature [#3108] My Bionic Pet The animals of the world may increasingly need our help with big issues like preserving their habitat or species conservation. But sometimes individual animals need our help as well. Left disabled without fins, flippers, beaks, or tails because of disease, accidents, or even human cruelty, these unfortunate creatures need what amounts to a miracle if they are to survive. Luckily for them, sometimes miracles do happen. Amazing prosthetics made possible by the latest engineering and technology are able to provide just what they need, and scientists are finding that innovations created in the process are benefitting both animals and humans. We will meet these inspiring animals and the remarkable individuals whose work has helped them live their lives again. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:00 pm
    Nova [#4108] Inside Animal Minds: Bird Genius What would it be like to go inside the mind of an animal? We have all gazed into a creature's eyes and wondered: what is it thinking about? What does it really know? Now, the revolutionary science of animal cognition is revealing hard evidence about how animals understand the world around them, uncovering their remarkable problem-solving abilities and exploring the complexity of their powers of communication and even their emotions. In this mini-series, NOVA explores these breakthroughs through three iconic creatures: dogs, birds and dolphins. We'll travel into the spectacularly nuanced noses of dogs and wolves, and ask whether their reliance on different senses has shaped their evolution. We'll see through the eyes of a starling in flight and test the tool-using skills of the smartest of birds, the crow. We'll listen in as scientists track dolphins in the Caribbean and elephants on the African savannah, trying to unlock the secrets of animal communication. As we discover how researchers are pushing the animal mind to its limits, we'll uncover surprising similarities to -- and differences from -- the human mind. Today, researchers are discovering that some creatures have mastered skills purportedly restricted to humans. Many are bird brains. Meet a cockatoo with a talent for picking locks; a wild crow on a mission to solve an eight-step puzzle; and a tame raven who can solve a puzzle box so quickly that his performance has to be captured with high-speed photography. Are these skills really evidence of high intelligence or just parlor tricks, the result of training and instinct? To find out, NOVA tests the limits of some of the planet's brainiest animals, searching for the secrets of a problem-solving mind. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 11:00 pm
    Your Inner Fish [#101] Your Inner Fish Our arms, legs, necks and lungs were bequeathed to us by a fish that lumbered onto land some 375 million years ago. The genetic legacy of this creature can be seen today in our own DNA, including the genes used to build our hands and limbs. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:00 am
    America Reframed [#208] My Brooklyn/Fate of a Salesman My Brooklyn is a documentary about Director Kelly Anderson's personal journey, as a Brooklyn "gentrifier," to understand the forces reshaping her neighborhood along lines of race and class. The film asks how to heal the deep racial wounds embedded in our urban development patterns, and how citizens can become active in restoring democracy to a broken planning process.
    Fate of a Salesman is an intimate portrait of a way of life on the verge of disappearing. In its 60th year of business, Men's Fashion Center in Washington, DC has come to represent identity, legacy and redemption for salesmen Willie and Steve and owner Jerry. But business has crawled to a halt in the face of a tough economy and changing neighborhood, pushing the store to the verge of closure. Set amidst racks of pin-striped suits and feathered hats, the clothing of a bygone era, the men struggle to redefine themselves as the place with which they have long identified begins to vanish.
    duration 1:59:11   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
Saturday, April 12, 2014

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TV Technical Issues

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    TV Technical Issues
    • Mon 11/03/14: Work on KQED Plus tower (DT54)

      Another station needs to do maintenance on its equipment on the tower on Monument Peak, requiring that we switch our DT54 Over the Air signal from the main antenna to the auxiliary when the work starts, then back to the main antenna at the conclusion. These switches should cause momentary outages only, and most receivers […]

    • Wed 10/15 morning: KQED Plus (KQEH) Over the Air signal down

      UPDATE: This problem has been resolved, and the OTA signal for the DT54 channels restored. (DT54.1 through 54.5) KQED Plus’ Over the Air transmission is currently off air via our KQEH transmitter on Monument Peak northeast of San Jose. Technicians are working on the problem. No current estimate regarding how long this will exist. We […]

    • KQET (DT25) Over the Air: Wed 8/27

      We are aware of the break-up issues for our DT25 Over the Air signal in the Monterey/Salinas area. This will also affect viewers of any cable or satellite signal provider using that transmitter as their source. Engineers are working on the problem.

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Channels 9.1, 54.2 & 25.1 - Monterey (KQET)
XFINITY 9 and HD 709

All widescreen and HD programs

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KQED +
Channels 54, 54.1, 9.2 & 25.2 - Monterey
XFINITY 10 and HD 2710

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

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KQED Life
Channel 54.3
XFINITY 189

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

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KQED World
Channel 9.3
XFINITY 190

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Channel 54.5 & 25.3
XFINITY 191 & 621

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Channel 54.4
XFINITY 192

Quality children's programming parents love too