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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Sunday, December 22, 2013

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Sunday, December 22, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    America Reframed [#108] My Louisiana Love This film traces a young woman's quest to find a place in her Native American community as it reels from decades of environmental degradation. Monique Verdin returns to Southeast Louisiana to reunite with her Houma Indian family. But soon she sees that her people's traditional way of life is threatened by a cycle of man-made environmental crises. Hurricane Katrina and the BP oil leak are just the latest rounds in this century-old cycle that is forcing Monique's clan to adapt in new ways. Monique must overcome the loss of her house, her father, and her partner, and redefine the meaning of home. duration 1:17:09   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Native Waters: A Chitimacha Recollection The Chitimacha, the 1000-member tribe known as "the People of Many Waters," are heirs to an unbroken 8000-year past. Living off the bounty of Louisiana's Atchafalaya Basin, one of the richest inland estuaries on the continent, this indigenous nation persists and rejuvenates its culture despite gradually losing its ancestral territory to environmental and man-made forces. This program journeys into sacred places of the Atchafalaya Basin with author Roger Stouff, the son of the last chief of the Chitimacha Indians and a keeper of his family's oral tradition. Stouff shares native stories, beliefs and perspectives about this often overlooked people. An avid fly-fisherman, Stouff laments the certain demise of the river basin, the depletion of its sacred fishing and hunting grounds and the painful "vanishings" of the time-honored Chitimacha way of life. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Teaching Channel Presents [#205] Arts Essentials Arts Essentials: Take a look at how teachers are designing arts programs that promote critical thinking and problem solving skills. Visit several classrooms where art, music, dance and drama are used to teach math and writing - along with helping students develop social skills and self-confidence. duration 57:02   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Moyers & Company [#250H] Incarceration Nation * There are more African Americans under correctional control today - in prison or jail, on probation or parole - than were enslaved in 1850, a decade before the Civil War began. According to The Sentencing Project, an advocacy group dedicated to changing how we think about crime and punishment, "More than 60% of the people in prison are now racial and ethnic minorities. For Black males in their thirties, one in every ten is in prison or jail on any given day." Because of the 40-year war on drugs and get tough sentencing policies, the American prison population has exploded from about 300,000 in the 1970's to more than 2 million today. The US has a higher rate of incarceration than any other nation and spends billions every year to keep people behind bars. The cost on democracy is immeasurable.
    This week, Bill Moyers speaks with civil rights lawyer and legal scholar Michelle Alexander. Her book The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness had just been published last time she joined Bill in conversation, 3.5 years ago. It's a work of scholarship that lays out how the war on drugs, harsh mandatory minimum sentencing and racism have converged to create a caste system in this country very much like the one under Jim Crow segregation laws. The book became a bestseller and spurred a wide conversation about justice and inequality in America - inspiring one reviewer to call it "the bible of a social movement."
    Michelle Alexander, an associate professor at Ohio State University and a civil rights lawyer, took a leave to travel the country, speaking, writing and campaigning to end our debilitating system of mass incarceration. Alexander tells Moyers, "If we are going to build a movement to end not only mass incarceration but to achieve much greater social equity for all, it's going have to be a movement that begins in our churches, in our faith communities, in our neighborhoods, in our schools. One where people really wake up and say, 'We are going to build a kind of democracy that we deserve.'"
    * This week's program also includes an excerpt from the film "Susan", by Tessa Blake and Emma Hewitt. It tells the story of former California inmate Susan Burton, who now runs 5 houses offering help to women struggling to rebuild their lives.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5325H] * President Obama met with the White House press for his end of year news conference
    * a new review on NSA practices
    * a rare budget deal in Congress
    * a look at the economy's standing at year's end
    Joining Gwen: Susan Davis, USA Today; Pete Williams, NBC News; Greg Ip, The Economist; Dan Balz, Washington Post.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3152H] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 5:00 am
    Charlie Rose - The Week [#123H] * Mike Allen on the week in politics * Anita Elberse, author of Blockbusters: Hit-Making, Risk-Taking and the Big Business of Entertainment * Magritte: The Mystery of the Ordinary at the Museum of Modern Art in New York * Ralph Fiennes and Felicity Jones discuss their film The Invisible Woman * an appreciation of Peter O'Toole duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2536H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    America Reframed [#108] My Louisiana Love This film traces a young woman's quest to find a place in her Native American community as it reels from decades of environmental degradation. Monique Verdin returns to Southeast Louisiana to reunite with her Houma Indian family. But soon she sees that her people's traditional way of life is threatened by a cycle of man-made environmental crises. Hurricane Katrina and the BP oil leak are just the latest rounds in this century-old cycle that is forcing Monique's clan to adapt in new ways. Monique must overcome the loss of her house, her father, and her partner, and redefine the meaning of home. duration 1:17:09   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:30 am
    Natural Heroes [#602H] Truck Farm Using green roof technology and heirloom seeds, filmmaker Ian Cheney plants a vegetable garden on the only land he's got: his Granddad's old pickup. Once the mobile garden begins to sprout, viewers are trucked across New York to see the city's funkiest urban farms, and to find out if America's largest city can learn to feed itself. The program entreats viewers to ponder the future of urban farming, and to consider whether sustainability needs a dose of whimsy to be truly sustainable. duration 26:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 8:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1716] 50 years after Gideon - The Supreme Court's unanimous Gideon decision in 1963 required that everyone accused of a serious crime - rich or poor - is entitled to a defense lawyer. But Tim O'Brien found a mixed result. In some places the Gideon defendants are adequately represented but in too many others they are not; taxpayers cannot or do not want to pay for poor people's legal defense.
    Christmas Peace - "Peace on Earth" is a major theme this time of year. According to the Christmas story in the Bible, angels proclaimed that message when they announced the birth of Jesus. But how do contemporary Christians understand that in an often chaotic world? Kim Lawton talks with Christians about what peace on earth means to them.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1026] Fed Centennial Special Is the 100th anniversary of the creation of the Federal Reserve (December 23, 1913) a cause for celebration or condemnation? Two financial historians James Grant ( Founder & Editor, "Grant's Interest Rate Observer") and Richard Sylla (Henry Kaufman Professor of the History of Financial Institutions and Markets, Stern School of Business, New York University) debate the benefits and dangers of the Fed. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 am
    Truth About Money with Ric Edelman [#316H] Financial advisor Ric Edelman talks about the pros and cons of investing in Real Estate. And we hear from a college grad who's looking to the future, the distant future. Plus what medical breakthrough technologies are worth investing in? All that and so much more on this edition of The Truth about Money with Ric Edelman. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2536H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 10:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3152H] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5325H] * President Obama met with the White House press for his end of year news conference
    * a new review on NSA practices
    * a rare budget deal in Congress
    * a look at the economy's standing at year's end
    Joining Gwen: Susan Davis, USA Today; Pete Williams, NBC News; Greg Ip, The Economist; Dan Balz, Washington Post.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    KQED NEWSROOM [#109H] NSA Surveillance, Mayor Chuck Reed and Farewell to Candlestick Park
    NSA Surveillance Programs Under Fire
    Pressure on the Obama administration to overhaul the National Security Agency's controversial surveillance program reached an all-time high. In a week when Silicon Valley executives, including the CEOs of Apple, Yahoo and Google, met with President Obama urging him to reign in the NSA's practices, a panel of advisers appointed by the president recommended major oversight of the program. That followed on the heels of a federal court ruling Monday which questioned the constitutionality of the agency's wholesale collection of personal cell phone data.

    Guests:
    Michelle Quinn, San Jose Mercury News
    Cindy Cohn, Electronic Frontier Foundation

    Further Reporting:

    Forum: Judge Rules NSA Surveillance Program Likely Unconstitutional

    San Jose Mayor Tackles Pension Reform
    Mayor Chuck Reed is spearheading a ballot initiative to reform the state's retirement benefits system. His proposal would allow public agencies to negotiate reduced pensions for future work while preserving pensions already earned. Opponents of the measure, including other California mayors and labor unions, see the move as an attack on the retirement security of police, firefighters and other public workers.

    Farewell to Candlestick Park
    Monday night's football game between the San Francisco 49ers and the Atlanta Falcons at Candlestick Park will mark the end of an era. It's the 49ers' last home game of the regular season, and a last hurrah for the park, which is slated to close after 53 years. While best known as a sports venue, Candlestick has hosted many other events, including the Beatles' last official concert in 1966 and a visit by Pope John Paul II in 1987. Scott Shafer takes a look at a Bay Area landmark affectionately known as "The 'Stick" with sports columnist Glenn Dickey.

    Further Reporting:

    News Fix: A Farewell to Candlestick Park
    News Pix: Farewell Candlestick, Hello Levi's
    Forum: Farewell to Candlestick

    Obamacare's First Deadline
    For people buying on the individual market who want health insurance starting Jan. 1, the deadline to sign up is Monday, Dec. 23. KQED Health editor Lisa Aliferis, and author of KQED's Obamacare Guide, provides an update on Covered California and the Affordable Care Act.
    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 11:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#250H] Incarceration Nation * There are more African Americans under correctional control today - in prison or jail, on probation or parole - than were enslaved in 1850, a decade before the Civil War began. According to The Sentencing Project, an advocacy group dedicated to changing how we think about crime and punishment, "More than 60% of the people in prison are now racial and ethnic minorities. For Black males in their thirties, one in every ten is in prison or jail on any given day." Because of the 40-year war on drugs and get tough sentencing policies, the American prison population has exploded from about 300,000 in the 1970's to more than 2 million today. The US has a higher rate of incarceration than any other nation and spends billions every year to keep people behind bars. The cost on democracy is immeasurable.
    This week, Bill Moyers speaks with civil rights lawyer and legal scholar Michelle Alexander. Her book The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness had just been published last time she joined Bill in conversation, 3.5 years ago. It's a work of scholarship that lays out how the war on drugs, harsh mandatory minimum sentencing and racism have converged to create a caste system in this country very much like the one under Jim Crow segregation laws. The book became a bestseller and spurred a wide conversation about justice and inequality in America - inspiring one reviewer to call it "the bible of a social movement."
    Michelle Alexander, an associate professor at Ohio State University and a civil rights lawyer, took a leave to travel the country, speaking, writing and campaigning to end our debilitating system of mass incarceration. Alexander tells Moyers, "If we are going to build a movement to end not only mass incarceration but to achieve much greater social equity for all, it's going have to be a movement that begins in our churches, in our faith communities, in our neighborhoods, in our schools. One where people really wake up and say, 'We are going to build a kind of democracy that we deserve.'"
    * This week's program also includes an excerpt from the film "Susan", by Tessa Blake and Emma Hewitt. It tells the story of former California inmate Susan Burton, who now runs 5 houses offering help to women struggling to rebuild their lives.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:30 pm
    Natural Heroes [#602H] Truck Farm Using green roof technology and heirloom seeds, filmmaker Ian Cheney plants a vegetable garden on the only land he's got: his Granddad's old pickup. Once the mobile garden begins to sprout, viewers are trucked across New York to see the city's funkiest urban farms, and to find out if America's largest city can learn to feed itself. The program entreats viewers to ponder the future of urban farming, and to consider whether sustainability needs a dose of whimsy to be truly sustainable. duration 26:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 1:00 pm
    Independent Lens [#1401H] Park Avenue: Money, Power & The American Dream If income inequality were a sport, the residents of 740 Park Avenue in Manhattan would all be medalists. This address boasts the highest number of billionaires of any apartment building in the United States, many of whom actively lobby and finance political campaigns to lower taxes on the wealthy. Less than four miles away Park Avenue runs through New York's 16th Congressional District in the South Bronx, which has the highest poverty rate in the U.S. Minutes away from one another as the crow flies these New Yorker's face dramatically different economic realities. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 2:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1208] Around The World - East to West: Istanbul to Vienna Ian Wright takes up the journey in Istanbul following historic trails through the heart of Europe and the Balkans, where once the Ottomans pushed into Europe. Crossing the Black Sea into Bulgaria, he explores vampire myths before continuing to Serbia, where the Nis Skull Tower stands as a reminder of Ottoman raids and rule. After a ride on the ? argan Eight Narrow Gauge Railway, it's on to the Croatian coast and a road trip to Dubrovnik, Split and Rijeka. After a quick dip in the world's largest thermal lake in Hungary, his journey ends in Vienna, old world capital of wide avenues and wedding cake mansions that withstood Ottoman attack and that stands in full splendor until this day. duration 56:54   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 3:00 pm
    Nature [#3008H] Cold Warriors: Wolves and Buffalo For thousands of years, wolves hunted buffalo across the vast North American plains until the westward settlement of the continent saw the virtual extinction of these vast herds and their eternal predators, the wolves. However, this ancient relationship was not lost altogether and continues uninterrupted in just one location -- on the northern edge of the continent's central plains in a place named Wood Buffalo National Park. Today the ancestors of those ancient buffalo and wolves still engage in epic life and death dramas across this northern land. Packs of wolves up to 30 strong hunt the largest land mammals on the continent -- buffalo. By getting to know a specific pack of wolves and the individuals that make up the pack, we get a sense of how these two animal species (wolves and buffalo) live together in what seems like a forgotten corner of the world. duration 55:16   SRND51 TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 4:00 pm
    Nova [#3604H] Extreme Ice In collaboration with National Geographic, Nova follows the exploits of acclaimed photojournalist James Balog and a scientific team as they deploy time-lapse cameras in risky, remote locations in the Arctic, Alaska, and the Alps. Grappling with blizzards, fickle technology, and climbs up craggy precipices, the team must anchor cameras capable of withstanding sub-zero temperatures and winds up to 170 mph. The goal of Balog's team's perilous expedition: to create a unique photo archive of melting glaciers that could provide a key to understanding their runaway behavior and their potential to drive rising sea levels.
    Some models now project a one-meter sea level rise over the next century, which could displace millions of people everywhere from Florida to Bangladesh and require trillions of dollars in new coastal infrastructure investments. But, alarmingly, these models don't reflect recent findings that glaciers in Greenland and Antarctica are melting at an ever-faster rate. What explains this alarming acceleration, and just how do you figure out what's happening inside a gigantic wall of ice? In this high-action scientific adventure, Nova investigates the mystery of the mighty ice sheets that will affect the fate of coastlines around the world.
    duration 54:19   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 5:00 pm
    Red Metal: The Copper Country Strike of 1913 This film explores an epic labor strike that devastated Michigan's Copper Country -- and haunts the American labor movement to this day. Among the notable elements of that strike was the death of 73 children at a union Christmas party. That tragedy (attributed to strikebreakers yelling "fire" in a crowded auditorium) was immortalized by Woody Guthrie in his ballad, "1913 Massacre," performed by Steve Earle in the film. The event, known as the Italian Hall Disaster, remains the deadliest unsolved manslaughter in US history. The program traces the Copper Country strike from its hopeful start to that tragic conclusion. Between those endpoints, the film explores the intensifying battle between organized labor and corporate power, as well as related issues of immigration, technology, and unchecked corporate interests. Of equal significance is the strike's cultural legacy, which influenced national discourse, music, and legislation during the Progressive Era and the New Deal. As the centennial of the Italian Hall Disaster approaches, a new generation of Americans has begun paying tribute to the victims, while also deliberating the strike's causes, outcomes, and legacy. duration 55:01   STEREO TVPG
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour Weekend [#132H] Included: correspondent John Larson heads out on a reporting trip and discovers a powerful story en route. The young man sitting next to him in coach reveals his immigrant family's success story and their fierce devotion to America. That, and the weekend's news, online and on-air. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    KQED NEWSROOM [#109H] NSA Surveillance, Mayor Chuck Reed and Farewell to Candlestick Park
    NSA Surveillance Programs Under Fire
    Pressure on the Obama administration to overhaul the National Security Agency's controversial surveillance program reached an all-time high. In a week when Silicon Valley executives, including the CEOs of Apple, Yahoo and Google, met with President Obama urging him to reign in the NSA's practices, a panel of advisers appointed by the president recommended major oversight of the program. That followed on the heels of a federal court ruling Monday which questioned the constitutionality of the agency's wholesale collection of personal cell phone data.

    Guests:
    Michelle Quinn, San Jose Mercury News
    Cindy Cohn, Electronic Frontier Foundation

    Further Reporting:

    Forum: Judge Rules NSA Surveillance Program Likely Unconstitutional

    San Jose Mayor Tackles Pension Reform
    Mayor Chuck Reed is spearheading a ballot initiative to reform the state's retirement benefits system. His proposal would allow public agencies to negotiate reduced pensions for future work while preserving pensions already earned. Opponents of the measure, including other California mayors and labor unions, see the move as an attack on the retirement security of police, firefighters and other public workers.

    Farewell to Candlestick Park
    Monday night's football game between the San Francisco 49ers and the Atlanta Falcons at Candlestick Park will mark the end of an era. It's the 49ers' last home game of the regular season, and a last hurrah for the park, which is slated to close after 53 years. While best known as a sports venue, Candlestick has hosted many other events, including the Beatles' last official concert in 1966 and a visit by Pope John Paul II in 1987. Scott Shafer takes a look at a Bay Area landmark affectionately known as "The 'Stick" with sports columnist Glenn Dickey.

    Further Reporting:

    News Fix: A Farewell to Candlestick Park
    News Pix: Farewell Candlestick, Hello Levi's
    Forum: Farewell to Candlestick

    Obamacare's First Deadline
    For people buying on the individual market who want health insurance starting Jan. 1, the deadline to sign up is Monday, Dec. 23. KQED Health editor Lisa Aliferis, and author of KQED's Obamacare Guide, provides an update on Covered California and the Affordable Care Act.
    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 7:00 pm
    Local USA [#109] Social Media We get social, with social media! Finding the people using social media to change the world. The Chicago painting duo, who use Twitter to reward treasure hunters; documentary cameras hit the streets of Raleigh-Durham, NC, to ask how social media influenced the 2012 presidential election; a look at what happens when an entire generation of Instagram users get together with their cameras on the beaches of Santa Monica, California; and how Facebook helped to make a young Los Angeleno boy's dream come true. duration 27:52   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:30 pm
    Local USA [#108] Death and Dying An uplifting meditation on death and dying with stories that prepares us for the journey. An embalmer in Toledo, Ohio prepares a deceased person with the precision and attention of an artist; a dying Brooklyn woman prepares for her final journey with dignity, grace and a dinner party; a teenage hospice volunteer shares advice from his patients and his experience growing up amidst a landscape of violence and death in Brooklyn, New York; and observations from an urban Memphis, Tennessee philosopher. duration 27:09   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#250H] Incarceration Nation * There are more African Americans under correctional control today - in prison or jail, on probation or parole - than were enslaved in 1850, a decade before the Civil War began. According to The Sentencing Project, an advocacy group dedicated to changing how we think about crime and punishment, "More than 60% of the people in prison are now racial and ethnic minorities. For Black males in their thirties, one in every ten is in prison or jail on any given day." Because of the 40-year war on drugs and get tough sentencing policies, the American prison population has exploded from about 300,000 in the 1970's to more than 2 million today. The US has a higher rate of incarceration than any other nation and spends billions every year to keep people behind bars. The cost on democracy is immeasurable.
    This week, Bill Moyers speaks with civil rights lawyer and legal scholar Michelle Alexander. Her book The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness had just been published last time she joined Bill in conversation, 3.5 years ago. It's a work of scholarship that lays out how the war on drugs, harsh mandatory minimum sentencing and racism have converged to create a caste system in this country very much like the one under Jim Crow segregation laws. The book became a bestseller and spurred a wide conversation about justice and inequality in America - inspiring one reviewer to call it "the bible of a social movement."
    Michelle Alexander, an associate professor at Ohio State University and a civil rights lawyer, took a leave to travel the country, speaking, writing and campaigning to end our debilitating system of mass incarceration. Alexander tells Moyers, "If we are going to build a movement to end not only mass incarceration but to achieve much greater social equity for all, it's going have to be a movement that begins in our churches, in our faith communities, in our neighborhoods, in our schools. One where people really wake up and say, 'We are going to build a kind of democracy that we deserve.'"
    * This week's program also includes an excerpt from the film "Susan", by Tessa Blake and Emma Hewitt. It tells the story of former California inmate Susan Burton, who now runs 5 houses offering help to women struggling to rebuild their lives.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 pm
    America Reframed [#108] My Louisiana Love This film traces a young woman's quest to find a place in her Native American community as it reels from decades of environmental degradation. Monique Verdin returns to Southeast Louisiana to reunite with her Houma Indian family. But soon she sees that her people's traditional way of life is threatened by a cycle of man-made environmental crises. Hurricane Katrina and the BP oil leak are just the latest rounds in this century-old cycle that is forcing Monique's clan to adapt in new ways. Monique must overcome the loss of her house, her father, and her partner, and redefine the meaning of home. duration 1:17:09   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:30 pm
    Global Voices [#613] A Village Called Versailles The incredible story of this little-known, tight-knit community in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. When the storm devastated New Orleans in August 2005, Versailles residents rebuilt their neighborhood faster than any other damaged neighborhood in the city, only to find themselves threatened by a new toxic landfill slated to open just two miles away. Forced out of Vietnam by the war 30 years ago, many residents felt their homes were being taken away from them once again. duration 56:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 11:30 pm
    Lost Years of Zora Neale Hurston Writer, folklorist and anthropologist Zora Neale Hurston, a celebrated (and sometimes controversial) figure of the Harlem Renaissance, first rose to prominence with Mules and Men (1935) and cemented her reputation soon after with her 1937 masterwork, Their Eyes Were Watching God. However, few know about the woman behind this widely read and highly acclaimed novel - particularly the last 10 years of her life.
    This program delves into the writer's life, work and philosophies, concentrating on her very productive but often overlooked, final decade. Interviews with Hurston experts and colleagues, letters from Hurston, and archival photographs piece together this fascinating chapter in the life of an American literary icon.
    duration 26:48   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:00 am
    Global Voices [#413] The Mosquito Problem and Other Stories A small town and its hopeful citizens are about to embark on a bright new journey. Massive rusty cranes, foreign investors, and the joyful chants of cheerleaders carry the dream of a great nuclear future. Disturbed only by gigantic stinging mosquitoes, the townsfolk celebrate the atomic hurray by engraving the nuclear power plant logo on buildings and soup bowls. Amidst the apparent atomic prosperity, lies a past that no one wants to remember. An island holding terrifying secrets. Stories of shocking and horrible crimes loom on the city just like the dark clouds of mosquitoes descending on its citizens. duration 54:07   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
Sunday, December 22, 2013

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TV Technical Issues

TV
    TV Technical Issues
    • Mon 11/03/14: Work on KQED Plus tower (DT54)

      Another station needs to do maintenance on its equipment on the tower on Monument Peak, requiring that we switch our DT54 Over the Air signal from the main antenna to the auxiliary when the work starts, then back to the main antenna at the conclusion. These switches should cause momentary outages only, and most receivers […]

    • Wed 10/15 morning: KQED Plus (KQEH) Over the Air signal down

      UPDATE: This problem has been resolved, and the OTA signal for the DT54 channels restored. (DT54.1 through 54.5) KQED Plus’ Over the Air transmission is currently off air via our KQEH transmitter on Monument Peak northeast of San Jose. Technicians are working on the problem. No current estimate regarding how long this will exist. We […]

    • KQET (DT25) Over the Air: Wed 8/27

      We are aware of the break-up issues for our DT25 Over the Air signal in the Monterey/Salinas area. This will also affect viewers of any cable or satellite signal provider using that transmitter as their source. Engineers are working on the problem.

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Channels 9.1, 54.2 & 25.1 - Monterey (KQET)
XFINITY 9 and HD 709

All widescreen and HD programs

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KQED +
Channels 54, 54.1, 9.2 & 25.2 - Monterey
XFINITY 10 and HD 2710

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KQED Life
Channel 54.3
XFINITY 189

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KQED World
Channel 9.3
XFINITY 190

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v-me

V-Me
Channel 54.5 & 25.3
XFINITY 191 & 621

24-hour national Spanish-language network

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KQED Kids
Channel 54.4
XFINITY 192

Quality children's programming parents love too