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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Saturday, October 26, 2013

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, October 26, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10785] duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#32233] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, the S&P closes at a record and the Nasdaq nears 4000. With the indexes at these lofty levels, where's the best place to find value in this market? And, how the oil and gas boom in North Dakota and Texas is also creating jobs at a shipyard in Philadelphia. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#3019] Tavis talks with the conductor laureate for the L.A. Philharmonic, Esa-Pekka Salonen, who reflects on his illustrious career and shares memories of the opening of the famed Walt Disney Concert Hall. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Life On Fire [#104H] Phoenix Temple In the vast emptiness of the Pacific Ocean, tectonic movements construct or swallow islands. In the Tongan archipelago, two little-known animals have learned to cope with these ephemeral lands risen from the ocean depths: the sooty tern, a seabird that never dares wet its wings for fear of drowning, and the Alvin shrimp, a blind crustacean that manages to find its way around the abyss. When an underwater volcano becomes an island, the fates of these two extraordinary paradoxes are linked. duration 55:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 3:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1708] CATHOLIC IDENTITY AT CATHOLIC COLLEGES - How should the country's 270 Catholic colleges and universities deal with social changes the Church opposes - gay rights and gay marriage, for instance? As Bob Faw reports, Georgetown University in Washington celebrates its Jesuit traditions of acceptance and free speech. At the conservative end of the spectrum, Jim Towey, president of Ave Maria University in Florida, says academic freedom must have limits.
    THE PAINFUL PILGRIMAGE OF CHRISTIAN WIMAN - Poet, seeker and victim, Christian Wiman talks with Judy Valente about his spiritual journey and the central importance of poetry, new metaphors and all the arts to experiencing, for him, the "glimmers of God." The former editor of Poetry magazine is teaching this year at the Yale Divinity School and Yale's Institute of Sacred Music. Married, with two young daughters, Wiman describes his "glimpses" of the holy at the same time that he endures an incurable cancer.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1018] Martin Whitman Exclusive This week's WT features an exclusive TV interview with legendary deep value investor Martin Whitman, Founder and Chairman of Third Avenue Management. In Consuelo Mack's interview, Whitman takes on Congressional and Wall Street ignorance about debt and credit worthiness. His view: They just don't get it! duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2233H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    Asian Voices [#212] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    Superheroes: A Never-Ending Battle [#103] A Hero Can Be Anyone (1978-Present) Superheroes are enthusiastically embraced in all forms of media and by all demographics, beginning with the historic Superman movie featuring Christopher Reeve as the Man of Steel. In 1986, Batman is overhauled as The Dark Knight to reflect the nocturnal underside of his character, and Watchmen brings new sophistication to comic book narratives, illuminating a violent and politicized world. In the new millennium, superheroes have taken over popular culture with feature films, television shows and video games complementing a new generation of web-based comics that bring superhero adventures to every corner of the world. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG-L (Secondary audio: none)
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    Pioneers of Television [#303] Superheroes "Superheroes" crosses many eras: "Superman" in the 1950s, "Batman" in the '60s, "Wonder Woman" and "The Incredible Hulk" in the '70s and "The Greatest American Hero" in the '80s. The episode features in-depth interviews with Adam West, Burt Ward, Julie Newmar, Lynda Carter, Lou Ferrigno, William Katt and others. It also includes comments from Robert Culp, about his show "The Greatest American Hero, " recorded just days before he passed away. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:00 am
    Moyers & Company [#242H] Progressives Pick Up The Pieces * It's the largest corporate fine in American history - $13 billion. That's the amount JP Morgan Chase will reportedly pay to settle civil charges around its alleged manipulation of mortgage securities - a series of shady business deals that 5 years ago crippled homeowners and helped trigger the meltdown that threatened the world's economy.
    And that's just the tip of a really big iceberg. There are reports that Chase will soon make another settlement - $6 billion worth - with institutional investors, and the bank is under investigation for possible involvement in everything from credit card fraud and Bernie Madoff's Ponzi scheme to criminally manipulating energy markets, money laundering and bribing Chinese officials with jobs for their kids. What does that tell us about the corruption of American capitalism?
    This week Bill Moyers poses that question to Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Gretchen Morgenson. She has been called "the most important financial journalist of her generation" by The Nation for her tough business reporting. In her "Fair Game" column for The New York Times she shares her hard-won knowledge and experience to explain to the rest of us the corporate hustle of Wall Street. Her most recent book, written with Joshua Rosner, is Reckless Endangerment: How Outsized Ambition, Greed and Corruption Led to Economic Armageddon.
    * Bill also speaks to historian and author Peter Dreier who sees the current political crisis as fraught with possibility for progressives in America - and shares the reasons he continues to be optimistic, including dynamic grass roots initiatives around the country and, believe it or not, the radical politics of Dr. Seuss, the late children's book author and illustrator whose real name was Theodor Geisel (Seuss was his middle name). In whimsical books like Yertle the Turtle and Green Eggs and Ham, the good "doctor" passed along some simple but powerful political philosophy. "The message that Dr. Seuss is sending in his books to young people is to stand up to arbitrary authority and take back your own life and - be a fighter for justice and for your own integrity," Dreier says. "I think that Dr. Seuss would be very pleased with a lot of the movements today because these are people standing up to authority and big power and trying to take the country back. Americans are beginning to feel like their voices can now be heard - that's what's happening all over the country. And that's why I'm optimistic - not because I get up in the morning with rose colored glasses. Because I really do think that we're at this transformational moment in our history."
    Dreier teaches at Occidental College in Los Angeles, where he carries on the progressive spirit of the college as a distinguished professor of politics and chair of the school's Urban and Environmental Policy department. He's also chair of the Cry Wolf Project, a non-profit that identifies and exposes misleading rhetoric about the economy and government. His most recent book is The 100 Greatest Americans of the 20th Century: A Social Justice Hall of Fame.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 8:00 am
    LinkAsia [#218] duration 26:46   STEREO
  • 8:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2528H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:00 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5317H] * The people trying to signup for health insurance coverage are not the only ones angry over the continuing problems with the HealthCare. gov website. President Obama is unhappy and taking immediate action to bring in more experts as well as tapping Jeffery Zients, incoming Director of the National Economic Council, to oversee repairs to the healthcare site. A growing number of Republicans are calling for the resignation of Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius. And many Democrats are concerned that if the technical problems with the Affordable Care Act website are not fixed in a timely manner it could make their 2014 reelection campaigns more difficult. John Dickerson of Slate Magazine will report on how the White House and congressional Democrats are trying to "reboot" and recover from the rocky rollout of the president's signature healthcare program.
    *Republicans are in their own "recovery" mode following the government shutdown earlier this month. Beth Reinhard of National Journal reports "It took a tea party insurrection that disabled the federal government and wrecked the Republican brand, but after months of handwringing, establishment Republicans are preparing to attack ultra-conservative ideologues across red America." Reinhard will take a closer look at the GOP strategy for winning the 2014 mid-term elections which may include running attack ads against tea party candidates for Congress.
    * Germany, one of Washington's closest allies, became the latest country to protest US surveillance tactics oversees after it was reported that the NSA had secretly monitored the cell phone of German Chancellor Angela Merkel. Recently Brazil, France and Mexico lodged similar complaints after news reports of the secret US surveillance of the phones of foreign leaders and citizens were published. Peter Baker of The New York Times and Kimberly Dozier of the Associated Press will examine if growing tensions over the US surveillance of foreign leaders and allies may be damaging US influence abroad.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:30 am
    KQED NEWSROOM [#102H] Obamacare Rolls Out in California and the Current Role of Organized Labor
    Obamacare Rolls Out in California
    As technical glitches hobble the rollout of new health care exchanges around the country under the Affordable Care Act (also known as Obamacare), California's customized system has been earning higher marks. But despite the law's goal of increasing access to health insurance, some Californians are bracing themselves for a marked increase in the cost of their coverage.

    Additional Information: Obamacare Explained: A Guide for Californians

    The Role of Labor Unions
    Commuters may be relieved that BART trains are running again, but the strike and an ongoing labor dispute at AC Transit have raised new questions about the role of unions in the current economy and workplace. Labor leaders say they are fighting to preserve living wages for all workers while critics say they have lost relevance. Thuy Vu talks with Harley Shaiken, a labor analyst at UC Berkeley.

    Ann Ravel Goes to Washington
    In her final week as chair of the California Fair Political Practices Commission, Ann Ravel scored a major victory. The commission announced a record fine against two nonprofits that funneled millions of dollars into last year's election without disclosing their donors. A former Santa Clara County counsel, Ravel starts her new job at the Federal Election Commission in Washington, D.C. next week. Scott Shafer spoke to Ravel about the challenges ahead for campaign finance reform.

    Further Report: California's Top Political Watchdog Leaves With a Bang
    duration 1:20:00   STEREO
  • 10:00 am
    BBC Newsnight [#17298Z] duration 28:18   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2233H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3144H] Topics: OBAMACARE WOES, U.S.-PAKISTAN RELATIONS. Panelists: Pat Buchanan, Author and Columnist; Eleanor Clift, Newsweek; Mort Zuckerman, US News & World Report; Guy Taylor, The Washington Times. duration 27:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Charlie Rose - The Week [#115] * Andrew Ross Sorkin on Jamie Dimon and JP Morgan Chase * Obamacare with Ezekiel Emanuel * Mike Allen on politics * Actor Robert Redford *Craig Venter discusses his book "Life at the Speed of Light" duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#242H] Progressives Pick Up The Pieces * It's the largest corporate fine in American history - $13 billion. That's the amount JP Morgan Chase will reportedly pay to settle civil charges around its alleged manipulation of mortgage securities - a series of shady business deals that 5 years ago crippled homeowners and helped trigger the meltdown that threatened the world's economy.
    And that's just the tip of a really big iceberg. There are reports that Chase will soon make another settlement - $6 billion worth - with institutional investors, and the bank is under investigation for possible involvement in everything from credit card fraud and Bernie Madoff's Ponzi scheme to criminally manipulating energy markets, money laundering and bribing Chinese officials with jobs for their kids. What does that tell us about the corruption of American capitalism?
    This week Bill Moyers poses that question to Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Gretchen Morgenson. She has been called "the most important financial journalist of her generation" by The Nation for her tough business reporting. In her "Fair Game" column for The New York Times she shares her hard-won knowledge and experience to explain to the rest of us the corporate hustle of Wall Street. Her most recent book, written with Joshua Rosner, is Reckless Endangerment: How Outsized Ambition, Greed and Corruption Led to Economic Armageddon.
    * Bill also speaks to historian and author Peter Dreier who sees the current political crisis as fraught with possibility for progressives in America - and shares the reasons he continues to be optimistic, including dynamic grass roots initiatives around the country and, believe it or not, the radical politics of Dr. Seuss, the late children's book author and illustrator whose real name was Theodor Geisel (Seuss was his middle name). In whimsical books like Yertle the Turtle and Green Eggs and Ham, the good "doctor" passed along some simple but powerful political philosophy. "The message that Dr. Seuss is sending in his books to young people is to stand up to arbitrary authority and take back your own life and - be a fighter for justice and for your own integrity," Dreier says. "I think that Dr. Seuss would be very pleased with a lot of the movements today because these are people standing up to authority and big power and trying to take the country back. Americans are beginning to feel like their voices can now be heard - that's what's happening all over the country. And that's why I'm optimistic - not because I get up in the morning with rose colored glasses. Because I really do think that we're at this transformational moment in our history."
    Dreier teaches at Occidental College in Los Angeles, where he carries on the progressive spirit of the college as a distinguished professor of politics and chair of the school's Urban and Environmental Policy department. He's also chair of the Cry Wolf Project, a non-profit that identifies and exposes misleading rhetoric about the economy and government. His most recent book is The 100 Greatest Americans of the 20th Century: A Social Justice Hall of Fame.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:00 pm
    QUEST [#704H] From Farm to Fork to Fuel Discover innovative approaches for producing and maximizing our food resources. Explore how a Milwaukee farmer feeds a growing urban population, discover strategies for reducing food waste in the San Francisco Bay Area and beyond, and go behind the scenes at a North Carolina facility that turns cooking grease into fuel. Plus, check out gardens on wheels in Omaha, Nebraska. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 1:30 pm
    BioCentury This Week [#244] duration 25:40   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    History Detectives [#1004H] What does the evocative symbol of a bird dropping a bomb mean? Did two patches with the symbol belong to a World War II unit? Then, Gwen Wright connects a tiny swatch of tattered red fabric to a pivotal moment in US Civil War history. Did a neckpiece and leggings once belong to Chief Black Kettle, known as a Cheyenne Peace Chief? Finally, did President Lincoln actually sign this note? duration 54:10   STEREO TVPG
  • 3:00 pm
    Apache 8 The heroic story of an all-women wildland firefighter crew from the White Mountain Apache Tribe, who have been fighting fires in Arizona and throughout the US, for over 25 years. The film delves into the challenging lives of these Native fire fighters. Four extraordinary women from different generations of the Apache 8 crew, share their personal narratives with humor and tenderness. duration 56:40   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 4:00 pm
    Gallery: The National Museum of the American Indian This program charts the unveiling and dedication of the first Smithsonian museum dedicated exclusively to American Indians. The grand unveiling of the National Museum of the American Indian coincided with the six-day, outdoor First American Festival and the Native Nations Festival. The colorful opening day began with a Native Nations Procession, the largest gathering of Native peoples in modern history. More than 25,000 American Indians, representing more than 500 tribes and Native communities - from as far north as Alaska to as far south as Chile - participated in this historic event. During the program, the museum's architects discuss the conception and design of the striking building, and landscaping, which was created to resemble a land form shaped by rain, water and nature. Throughout the documentary, American Indians share their thoughts on the importance of the museum, their heritage and passing along traditions to the next generation. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 4:30 pm
    Independent Lens [#1419] The Waiting Room/Let Me Down Easy Highland Hospital, a vital part of the city of Oakland, California and the surrounding county, is stretched to the breaking point. It is the primary care facility for 250,000 patients of nearly every nationality, race, and religion, with 250 patients crowding its emergency room every day. This remarkably diverse population -- and the hospital staff charged with caring for them -- is battling its way through seismic shifts in the nation's healthcare system, while weathering the storm of a national recession. duration 1:26:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour Weekend [#115H] On Saturday NewsHour Weekend goes inside the high-tech criminal mind. It's no secret that cybercriminals are stealing personal information and credit card numbers by hacking into corporate and government computers. One school in Pittsburgh is training the next generation of cybersecurity experts to fight off the bad guys -- by teaching them to think the same way. That, and the weekend's news, online and on-air. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5317H] * The people trying to signup for health insurance coverage are not the only ones angry over the continuing problems with the HealthCare. gov website. President Obama is unhappy and taking immediate action to bring in more experts as well as tapping Jeffery Zients, incoming Director of the National Economic Council, to oversee repairs to the healthcare site. A growing number of Republicans are calling for the resignation of Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius. And many Democrats are concerned that if the technical problems with the Affordable Care Act website are not fixed in a timely manner it could make their 2014 reelection campaigns more difficult. John Dickerson of Slate Magazine will report on how the White House and congressional Democrats are trying to "reboot" and recover from the rocky rollout of the president's signature healthcare program.
    *Republicans are in their own "recovery" mode following the government shutdown earlier this month. Beth Reinhard of National Journal reports "It took a tea party insurrection that disabled the federal government and wrecked the Republican brand, but after months of handwringing, establishment Republicans are preparing to attack ultra-conservative ideologues across red America." Reinhard will take a closer look at the GOP strategy for winning the 2014 mid-term elections which may include running attack ads against tea party candidates for Congress.
    * Germany, one of Washington's closest allies, became the latest country to protest US surveillance tactics oversees after it was reported that the NSA had secretly monitored the cell phone of German Chancellor Angela Merkel. Recently Brazil, France and Mexico lodged similar complaints after news reports of the secret US surveillance of the phones of foreign leaders and citizens were published. Peter Baker of The New York Times and Kimberly Dozier of the Associated Press will examine if growing tensions over the US surveillance of foreign leaders and allies may be damaging US influence abroad.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 pm
    KQED NEWSROOM [#102H] Obamacare Rolls Out in California and the Current Role of Organized Labor
    Obamacare Rolls Out in California
    As technical glitches hobble the rollout of new health care exchanges around the country under the Affordable Care Act (also known as Obamacare), California's customized system has been earning higher marks. But despite the law's goal of increasing access to health insurance, some Californians are bracing themselves for a marked increase in the cost of their coverage.

    Additional Information: Obamacare Explained: A Guide for Californians

    The Role of Labor Unions
    Commuters may be relieved that BART trains are running again, but the strike and an ongoing labor dispute at AC Transit have raised new questions about the role of unions in the current economy and workplace. Labor leaders say they are fighting to preserve living wages for all workers while critics say they have lost relevance. Thuy Vu talks with Harley Shaiken, a labor analyst at UC Berkeley.

    Ann Ravel Goes to Washington
    In her final week as chair of the California Fair Political Practices Commission, Ann Ravel scored a major victory. The commission announced a record fine against two nonprofits that funneled millions of dollars into last year's election without disclosing their donors. A former Santa Clara County counsel, Ravel starts her new job at the Federal Election Commission in Washington, D.C. next week. Scott Shafer spoke to Ravel about the challenges ahead for campaign finance reform.

    Further Report: California's Top Political Watchdog Leaves With a Bang
    duration 1:20:00   STEREO
  • 7:30 pm
    QUEST [#704H] From Farm to Fork to Fuel Discover innovative approaches for producing and maximizing our food resources. Explore how a Milwaukee farmer feeds a growing urban population, discover strategies for reducing food waste in the San Francisco Bay Area and beyond, and go behind the scenes at a North Carolina facility that turns cooking grease into fuel. Plus, check out gardens on wheels in Omaha, Nebraska. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1216] Scotland Megan journeys to Glasgow, where she visits the Macintosh Museum and takes a bagpipe lesson. Next she travels to Stirling, site of a major victory by William "Braveheart" Wallace, Scotland's national hero. Megan samples the whiskey on the island of Islay, explores the mountainous region of Oben, goes fishing off the Isle of Skye, tours the battlefield of Culloden and pursues the myth of the Loch Ness Monster. She then travels to Strathdon for the Clanloddoch Highland games, witnesses an Orkadian wedding in Skara Brae, hits the links at St. Andrews and revels in the performances at the Edinburgh Festival. duration 56:43   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 9:00 pm
    Nature [#3003(] Animal Odd Couples A tiger cub with no mother in sight. A baby hippo. An abandoned meerkat pup. Without nurturing, these infants face certain death. Enter stories of the most unlikely cross-species relationships imaginable: a chimp bottle-feeding a tiger cub; a giant tortoise snuggling a baby hippo; a black crow parenting a meerkat. Aberrations of nature? Instincts gone awry? Does this kind of bonding form only when animals are removed from their natural environments? Or are they evidence of a broad array of emotions among animals? This film will look at these remarkable relationships firsthand, and through caregivers, biologists and animal behaviorists, explore what they suggest about the nature of animal emotions. duration 55:03   SRND51 TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 10:00 pm
    Nova [#4019H] Making Stuff Wilder In this mini-series, New York Times' technology correspondent and best-selling author David Pogue takes a wild ride through the cutting-edge science that is powering a next wave of technological innovation. With his humor and zest for discovery, Pogue meets the scientists and engineers who are plunging to the bottom of the temperature scale, finding design inspiration in nature, and breaking every speed limit to make tomorrow's "stuff" colder, faster, wilder and safer. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 11:00 pm
    Raw to Ready [#102H] Bentley It's a century-old obsession to find the right raw materials to build a car that is fit for both king and race car driver - perfectly luxurious and perfectly fast. The Bentley Motor Company has built common raw ingredients into their signature Mulsanne, an engineering achievement made possible by aluminum, leather, iron, wood and pigment. duration 56:46   SRND51 TVPG
  • 12:00 am
    America Reframed [#114] America Dreams Deferred A young Latino man, William Caballero, juggles unconditional family love with the challenges of breaking the cycle that has kept so many relatives from reaching their dreams. Set against a backdrop of Coney Island and Fayetteville, North Carolina, an NYU graduate student turns the camera on his Puerto Rican-American family plagued by social, medical and public health issues. US health care and culture is examined through this young man's lens, which also explores both his and family's dreams. Many immigrants in the US aspire to achieve the American dream and this Latino family comprised of immigrants to second-generation Americans is no different. As subjective as the barometer of reaching this goal is, the film begs the ultimate question: who attains their American dream? duration 1:59:00   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
Saturday, October 26, 2013

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TV Technical Issues

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    TV Technical Issues
    • KQET (DT25) Over the Air: Wed 8/27

      We are aware of the break-up issues for our DT25 Over the Air signal in the Monterey/Salinas area. This will also affect viewers of any cable or satellite signal provider using that transmitter as their source. Engineers are working on the problem.

    • Week of 8/25: Sutro Tower work (including KQED 9 Over the Air)

      (Affects several San Francisco TV & Radio stations, including KQED 9.1, 9.2 & 9.3) During the week of August 25, Monday through Friday, between 9am and 4pm, several TV and radio stations will be switching to their Auxiliary antennas. This is being done so that the tower crew can perform routine maintenance on the regular […]

    • KQET Off Air Sun 8/03 morning

      (DT25.1, 25.2, 25.3) KQET DT25 was off the air for a portion of Sunday morning, due to the transmitter taking a power hit. The signal has been restored. Most receivers should have re-acquired our signal once it returned, but a few Over the Air viewers may need to do a rescan in order to restore […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Comcast 9 and 709
Digital 9.1, 54.2 or 25.1

All widescreen and HD programs

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Channel 54
Comcast 10 and 710
Digital 9.2, 54.1 or 25.2

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

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KQED Life
Comcast 189
Digital 54.3

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

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KQED World
Comcast 190
Digital 9.3

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Comcast 191 & 621
Digital 54.5 or 25.3

24-hour national Spanish-language network

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KQED Kids
Comcast 192
Digital 54.4

Quality children's programming parents love too