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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Saturday, October 19, 2013

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, October 19, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10780] Secretary of Homeland Security * Healthcare Problems * Common Ancestry * Remembering Speaker Foley * Shields & Brooks duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#32228] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, Google cracks $1000 a share making it only the second stock in the S&P ever to do so. NBR will explore why this company is so important to your portfolio and your everyday life. And, flipping homes is back, but this time it's different. NBR will tell you why investors are finding some of the biggest returns in the high-end market. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#3014] Tavis talks with Emmy-nominated British actress Jacqueline Bisset.The international film star talks about her latest projects, including the jazz drama miniseries, Dancing on the Edge duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Life On Fire [#103H] The Surprise Salmon In Alaska, the fresh water that feeds the rivers is snowmelt from North America's highest mountains and most active volcanoes. Time and again, they erupt and poison the rivers. Scientists have only just begun to piece together what might have happened nearly 2,000 years ago, when one race of salmon faced the death of their natal river and were forced back to the open ocean on an exceptional adventure. Navigating between the sulphurous waters, bears, sharks and eagles, the fish escaped the Earth's wrath to give birth to descendants that continue their pioneering journey to the heart of an active volcano. duration 55:46   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1707] LAWYERS FOR JUSTICE - In much of Asia where poverty is widespread, the rule of law weak and human rights only starting to get traction, lawyers generally represent only the rich and powerful. Lucky Severson reports from Chiang Mai, Thailand on Bruce Lasky, a lawyer from New York who is working with law schools in Southeast Asia to set up pro bono legal clinics to help the poor and disenfranchised there.
    12 YEARS A SLAVE - The powerful movie 12 Years a Slave, based on a true story of a free black man kidnapped and sold into slavery, premieres this weekend. Deborah Potter interviews the film's director, the lead actor and Princeton Theological Seminary professor Yolanda Pierce, on how the Bible was used both to justify slavery and also to inspire slaves and abolitionists to work for freedom.
    CONSERVATIVE JUDAISM CENTENNIAL - A century after its founding, Conservative Judaism still represents a centrist approach to Jewish life, one that is both rooted in tradition and informed by modernity. But it faces challenges as membership declines and leaders look for ways to expand outreach, especially to younger Jews.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1017] Dirty Words of Finance Leverage. Derivatives. Shorting. The three "dirty words" of finance, according to this week's guest, became a regular part of our vocabulary after the 2008 financial crisis, but how can investors get back to "clean" investing principles? Our Financial Thought Leader this week is Cliff Asness, Managing and Founding Principal of AQR Capital Management, a global investment management firm which runs hedge funds, mutual funds, and a diversified collection of investment strategies. In this rare interview, he'll discuss the three legs of his "investment stool" and the tools we can use to diversify our portfolios. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2232H] * Female Senators End the Shutdown * Janet Yellen Inspiring Young Women * Interview with former Senator Hutchison.
    Panelists: Megan Beyer, Hadley Heath, Patricia Sosa, Rina Shah.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    Asian Voices [#211] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    Superheroes: A Never-Ending Battle [#101] Truth, Justice, and the American Way (1938-1958) Join host and narrator Liev Schreiber to explore the dawn of the comic book genre and trace the evolution of the characters and their ongoing cultural impact worldwide. Chart the progression from the first comic books born during the Great Depression to the television debut of Superman in the 1950s, to the emergence of superheroes who reflect changing social mores in the 1960s and 70s, to today's insatiable enthusiasm for superheroes embraced in all media and by all demographics. Featuring on-camera interviews with Stan Lee, Adam West, Lynda Carter, Michael Chabon and Todd McFarlane. duration 2:56:46   SRND51 TVPG-L
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    Superheroes: A Never-Ending Battle [#102] Great Power, Great Responsibility (1959-1977) In the 1960s, a new breed of superhero emerges in pages of Marvel Comics, inspired by the age of atomic energy and space travel and, in turn, inspiring the pop culture and pop artists of the time. Spider-Man, the Hulk and others are the first to have "problems" with which an adult audience can identify, and contemporary social issues make their way into comic books. Black powerhouses such as the Black Panther and Luke Cage appear on the scene, and the pages of "Green Lantern/Green Arrow" explode with relevant storylines as comic books are forced to confront the reality of an increasingly complex world. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:00 am
    Moyers & Company [#241H] America's Political Breakdown * After a 16-day shutdown, there's finally a deal to raise the debt limit and reopen the government. But the can's just been kicked down the road - another Congressional confrontation over spending cuts, entitlement programs and possible default will take place within a few months. Nonetheless, Martin Wolf, the chief economics commentator of the Financial Times, believes that no matter the rhetoric and flamethrowing, the debt ceiling has to be raised because the alternatives are "simply, unimaginably horrible."
    This week, Wolf - who has been described as "the premier financial and economics writer in the world" - joins Bill Moyers for a discussion of the current DC crisis and its potentially lethal impact on the global economy. Wolf views the debt ceiling as the legislative equivalent of a nuclear bomb the US has aimed at itself. But its deadly fallout could spread everywhere.
    * Bill also speaks with media scholar Sherry Turkle, who says that the Internet and social media have changed not only what we do but also who we are. She's a clinical psychologist and one of the first to study the impact of computers on culture and society. A professor at MIT and director of the university's Initiative on Technology and Self, Turkle has written several important books, her most recent, Alone Together: Why We Expect More from Technology and Less from Each Other.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 8:00 am
    LinkAsia [#217] duration 26:46   STEREO
  • 8:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2527H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:00 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5316H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:30 am
    KQED NEWSROOM [#101H] BART Unions Strike and a Conversation with Chief Justice Tani Cantil-Sakauye
    BART Unions Strike After Negotiations Collapse
    The breakdown of negotiations between BART management and the workers' unions affects commuters, employers, and businesses across the Bay Area. The BART strike and an ongoing labor dispute between AC Transit and its workers raises questions about the role of unions and whether transit workers should even be banned from striking.

    A Conversation With Chief Justice Tani Cantil-Sakauye
    In her nearly three years as Chief Justice of the California Supreme Court, Tani Cantil-Sakauye has weathered severe state budget cuts, revolt by a band of unhappy lower court judges and controversy over a bloated statewide computer system she inherited from her predecessor. She sat down with senior correspondent Scott Shafer to talk about crime, punishment, how growing up the daughter of Filipino-Portuguese farmworkers affects her view from the bench and what she learned from her years as a blackjack dealer in Las Vegas.

    Further Report: State Supreme Court Chief Justice Decries 'Two-Tier System'

    Vaccine Refusals at Record High in Marin
    In Marin County, many health experts are alarmed about a growing trend: a rising number of parents who choose to delay or skip vaccines for highly contagious diseases. County public health officials say the number of vaccinated kindergarteners has dipped so low in many schools that it's only a matter of time before a serious measles outbreak occurs.

    Further Report: Health Officials: Marin Parents Opting Out of Vaccines Put Community at Risk

    duration 1:20:00   STEREO
  • 10:00 am
    BBC Newsnight [#17291Z] duration 28:18   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2232H] * Female Senators End the Shutdown * Janet Yellen Inspiring Young Women * Interview with former Senator Hutchison.
    Panelists: Megan Beyer, Hadley Heath, Patricia Sosa, Rina Shah.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3143H] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Charlie Rose - The Week [#114] Senator Claire McCaskill of Missouri on the deal that ended the government shutdown; Graydon Carter of Vanity Fair; Mariano Rivera reflects on his career; James Levine, music director of the Metropolitan Opera. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#241H] America's Political Breakdown * After a 16-day shutdown, there's finally a deal to raise the debt limit and reopen the government. But the can's just been kicked down the road - another Congressional confrontation over spending cuts, entitlement programs and possible default will take place within a few months. Nonetheless, Martin Wolf, the chief economics commentator of the Financial Times, believes that no matter the rhetoric and flamethrowing, the debt ceiling has to be raised because the alternatives are "simply, unimaginably horrible."
    This week, Wolf - who has been described as "the premier financial and economics writer in the world" - joins Bill Moyers for a discussion of the current DC crisis and its potentially lethal impact on the global economy. Wolf views the debt ceiling as the legislative equivalent of a nuclear bomb the US has aimed at itself. But its deadly fallout could spread everywhere.
    * Bill also speaks with media scholar Sherry Turkle, who says that the Internet and social media have changed not only what we do but also who we are. She's a clinical psychologist and one of the first to study the impact of computers on culture and society. A professor at MIT and director of the university's Initiative on Technology and Self, Turkle has written several important books, her most recent, Alone Together: Why We Expect More from Technology and Less from Each Other.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:00 pm
    QUEST [#702H] Lake Tahoe: Can We Save It? Lake Tahoe's clear, blue waters attract 3 million visitors to California and Nevada each year. But the lake is still paying the price of the rampant development that took place in the 1960s and now faces a new threat in climate change. Meet the small army of scientists and others who toil behind the scenes to turn back the clock to a time when you could see 100 feet down into the lake. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 1:30 pm
    BioCentury This Week [#243] duration 25:40   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    Frontline [#3202] League of Denial: The NFL's Concussion Crisis duration 1:26:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 pm
    Frontline [#2911H] Football High High school football has never had a higher profile, with nationally televised games, corporate sponsorships and minute-by-minute coverage on sports websites. In northwest Arkansas, Frontline examines one ambitious high school team working its way towards national renown. With a superstar quarterback at the helm, tiny Shiloh Christian is striving to join the ranks of the country's best high school teams - teams whose workout schedules, practices and styles of play increasingly imitate the pros. But as high school players grow bigger, faster and stronger, there are growing concerns about the health and safety of these young players - with rising rates of concussions, career-ending injuries, even death. In Arkansas, Frontline documents a tragic story of heatstroke injuries that reveal how weak regulation has created a crucial lack of athletic trainers at most high schools. It all raises a critical question: has the amped-up culture of high school football outrun necessary protections for the boys who play the game? duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 5:00 pm
    POV [#2606H] Neurotypical "Neurotypical" is an exploration of autism from the point of view of autistic people themselves. Four-year-old Violet, teenaged Nicholas and adult Paula occupy different positions on the autism spectrum, but they are all at pivotal moments in their lives. How they and the people around them work out their perceptual and behavioral differences becomes a remarkable reflection of the "neurotypical" world -- the world of the non-autistic -- revealing inventive adaptations on each side and an emerging critique of both what it means to be normal and what it means to be human. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour Weekend [#113H] Included: While US immigration policy makes it difficult for immigrant entrepreneurs to get visas to set up shop in the US, Chile is welcoming them with open arms. Through an initiative called Start-Up Chile, the country is aiming to be the high-tech hub of South America. That, and the weekend's news, online and on-air. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5316H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 pm
    KQED NEWSROOM [#101H] BART Unions Strike and a Conversation with Chief Justice Tani Cantil-Sakauye
    BART Unions Strike After Negotiations Collapse
    The breakdown of negotiations between BART management and the workers' unions affects commuters, employers, and businesses across the Bay Area. The BART strike and an ongoing labor dispute between AC Transit and its workers raises questions about the role of unions and whether transit workers should even be banned from striking.

    A Conversation With Chief Justice Tani Cantil-Sakauye
    In her nearly three years as Chief Justice of the California Supreme Court, Tani Cantil-Sakauye has weathered severe state budget cuts, revolt by a band of unhappy lower court judges and controversy over a bloated statewide computer system she inherited from her predecessor. She sat down with senior correspondent Scott Shafer to talk about crime, punishment, how growing up the daughter of Filipino-Portuguese farmworkers affects her view from the bench and what she learned from her years as a blackjack dealer in Las Vegas.

    Further Report: State Supreme Court Chief Justice Decries 'Two-Tier System'

    Vaccine Refusals at Record High in Marin
    In Marin County, many health experts are alarmed about a growing trend: a rising number of parents who choose to delay or skip vaccines for highly contagious diseases. County public health officials say the number of vaccinated kindergarteners has dipped so low in many schools that it's only a matter of time before a serious measles outbreak occurs.

    Further Report: Health Officials: Marin Parents Opting Out of Vaccines Put Community at Risk

    duration 1:20:00   STEREO
  • 7:30 pm
    QUEST [#702H] Lake Tahoe: Can We Save It? Lake Tahoe's clear, blue waters attract 3 million visitors to California and Nevada each year. But the lake is still paying the price of the rampant development that took place in the 1960s and now faces a new threat in climate change. Meet the small army of scientists and others who toil behind the scenes to turn back the clock to a time when you could see 100 feet down into the lake. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1219] Globe Trekker Food Hour: Lebanon The rich soil and varied history of Lebanon have resulted in a world-class cuisine. Merrilees Parker travels to the capital of Beirut and then in to the countryside of Lebanon to learn more about its people, their culture and their cuisine. duration 56:05   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 9:00 pm
    Nature [#3101] Saving Otter 501 On a typical late summer day a baby sea otter washes up on the beach in Monterey, California - hungry, lost, injured. It's a tragic event, but not surprising. California sea otters are struggling. For decades marine biologist Karl Mayer and his small staff have worked unceasingly - one otter at a time - to bring this "keystone" species back from the brink of extinction so it can play its important role in the local marine environment. But the effort has stalled, and no one knows why.
    This is the story of the Monterey Bay Aquarium's 501st attempt to save an orphan otter. From her discovery as a stranded newborn pup crying on the beach through her rehabilitation in secret roof tanks atop the Aquarium, we follow as Otter 501 learns how to dive, hunt, eat, and fend for herself in the wild, where survival is a long shot at best.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:00 pm
    Nova [#4018#] Making Stuff Faster In this mini-series, New York Times' technology correspondent and best-selling author David Pogue takes a wild ride through the cutting-edge science that is powering a next wave of technological innovation. With his humor and zest for discovery, Pogue meets the scientists and engineers who are plunging to the bottom of the temperature scale, finding design inspiration in nature, and breaking every speed limit to make tomorrow's "stuff" colder, faster, wilder and safer. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 11:00 pm
    Raw to Ready [#101#] Komatsu To extract precious metals found beneath the earth requires a massive 232-ton, two-story-tall dump truck with a load capacity of 320 tons - a giant earth-mover like the Komatsu 930-E. This amazing engineering achievement is made possible by five essential raw ingredients: coal, chromium, mineral oil, latex rubber and sulphuric acid, an electron superhighway that generates massive power. duration 56:46   SRND51 TVPG
  • 12:00 am
    America Reframed [#206] Plagues and Pleasures on the Salton Sea Once known as the California Riviera, the Salton Sea is now called one of America's worst ecological disasters: a fetid, stagnant, salty lake, that coughs up dead fish and birds by the thousands in frequent die-offs that occur. However, amongst the ruins of this man-made mistake, a few remaining eccentrics (a roadside nudist, a religious folk artist, a Hungarian revolutionary, and real estate speculators) struggle to keep a remodeled version of the original Salton Sea dream alive. Accidentally created by an engineering error in 1905, reworked in the 50's as a world class vacation destination for the rich and famous, suddenly abandoned after a series of hurricanes, floods, and fish die-offs, and finally almost saved by Congressman Sonny Bono, the Salton Sea has a bittersweet past. The film shares these people's stories and their difficulties in keeping their unique community alive, as the nearby cities of Los Angeles and San Diego attempt to take the agricultural water run-off that barely sustains the Salton Sea. While covering the historical, economic, political, and environmental issues that face the Sea, this program offers an offbeat portrait of the peculiar and individualistic people who populate its shores. It is an epic western tale of fantastic real estate ventures and failed boomtowns, inner-city gangs fleeing to white small town America, and the subjective notion of success and failure amidst the ruins of the past. duration 1:26:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
Saturday, October 19, 2013

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TV Technical Issues

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    TV Technical Issues
    • KQET (DT25) Over the Air: Wed 8/27

      We are aware of the break-up issues for our DT25 Over the Air signal in the Monterey/Salinas area. This will also affect viewers of any cable or satellite signal provider using that transmitter as their source. Engineers are working on the problem.

    • Week of 8/25: Sutro Tower work (including KQED 9 Over the Air)

      (Affects several San Francisco TV & Radio stations, including KQED 9.1, 9.2 & 9.3) During the week of August 25, Monday through Friday, between 9am and 4pm, several TV and radio stations will be switching to their Auxiliary antennas. This is being done so that the tower crew can perform routine maintenance on the regular […]

    • KQET Off Air Sun 8/03 morning

      (DT25.1, 25.2, 25.3) KQET DT25 was off the air for a portion of Sunday morning, due to the transmitter taking a power hit. The signal has been restored. Most receivers should have re-acquired our signal once it returned, but a few Over the Air viewers may need to do a rescan in order to restore […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

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