Donate

TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus. Read more about this transition on our FAQ page.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Sunday, October 6, 2013

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Sunday, October 6, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    America Reframed [#204] The New Public This program follows the lives of the ambitious educators and lively students of Bed Stuy's new Brooklyn Community Arts and Media High School (BCAM) over the course of the founding year, with the filmmakers returning three years later to again document the senior year of that first graduating class. Beginning in August 2006, just days before BCAM will open its doors for the first time. Dr. James O'Brien, former D.J. and point guard turned first-time principal, and his faculty of eight, take to the streets in Bed Stuy, Brooklyn to recruit students. Their enthusiasm is infectious and enticing: strong support for the individual student, a rigorous academic curriculum and unconventional arts electives taught by local artists. While at first running smoothly, as months go by, conflicts arise, and by the end of freshman year, the school's idealistic vision is addressing some issues, but aggravating others. Flash-forward to September 2010, the first day of senior year, the school is complete with 4 grades and 450 students, with a faculty that has grown from 8 to 50. Of the 104 students in their founding class, almost half have transferred or dropped out, leaving a senior class of 60 and only 30 on track to graduate. BCAM has made major adjustments, most notably, more disciplinary structure and no arts electives for seniors. What happens in the 4 years is both compelling and frustrating, and it's what makes The New Public a critical document of the complexities, frustrations and personal dramas that put public education at the center of national debate. What makes a kid or a school succeed are a series of complicated, interconnected dynamics, including, a re-evaluation of how we define success. duration 1:56:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Teaching Channel Presents [#303] New Teacher Survival Guide We'll follow several new teachers and their mentors as they focus on essential first-year skills from lesson planning to classroom management to differentiation. This hour is filled with useful "do's and don'ts" for new teachers. duration 59:00   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Moyers & Company [#239H] Wendell Berry: Poet & Prophet Wendell Berry, a quiet and humble man, has become an outspoken advocate for revolution. He urges immediate action as he mourns how America has turned its back on the land and rejected Jeffersonian principles of respect for the environment and sustainable agriculture. Berry warns, "People who own the world outright for profit will have to be stopped; by influence, by power, by us." In a rare television interview, this visionary, author - and farmer - discusses a sensible, but no-compromise plan to save the Earth.
    This week, Bill Moyers profiles this passionate advocate, a man of the land and one of America's most influential writers, whose prolific career includes more than forty books of poetry, novels, short stories, and essays. This one-on-one conversation was taped at Kentucky's St. Catharine College during a two-day celebrating Wendell Berry's life and ideas and marking the 35th anniversary of the publication of his landmark book, The Unsettling of America.
    Berry, described by environmental activist Bill McKibben as "a prophet of responsibility, " lives and works on the Kentucky farm where his family has tilled the soil for 200 years. He's a man of action as well as words. In 2011, he joined a four-day sit-in at the Kentucky governor's office to protest mountaintop mining, a brutally destructive method of extracting coal. Moyers explores Berry's views on civil disobedience as well as his strong opposition to agribusiness and massive industrial farms, as well as his support for sustainable farming and the local food movement.
    "It's mighty hard right now to think of anything that's precious that isn't endangered," Berry tells Moyers. "There are no sacred and unsacred places; there are only sacred and desecrated places. My belief is that the world and our life in it are conditional gifts. We have the world to live in on the condition that we will take good care of it. And to take good care of it we have to know it. And to know it and to be willing to take care of it, we have to love it."
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5314H] Democrats and Republicans don't agree on how to end the government shutdown but leaders from both parties seem to be suggesting the standoff could last for weeks and grow into an even bigger crisis - the possible default by the Treasury if Congress fails to raise the nation's debt ceiling. House Speaker John Boehner (R-OH) insists President Obama owns the shutdown because he is unwilling to negotiate over delaying or defunding the Affordable Care Act as part of a deal to reopen the government. President Barack Obama blames the shutdown on Tea Party Republicans and their ideological opposition to the 2010 healthcare law which was later upheld by the Supreme Court.
    Meanwhile the new online health insurance exchanges at the heart of the standoff on Capitol Hill opened for business on Tuesday. Despite some technical glitches, the White House says more than 6-million people have logged in during the first two days of open enrollment.
    While the political blame game continues in Washington, federal facilities have been shutdown and an estimated 800,000 federal government workers nationwide have been put on furlough.
    What will it take to bridge partisan differences to breakthrough the political deadlock? Will the president's declaration that he won't negotiate over the debt ceiling limit his options in coming up with a compromise? And even with a deal, has the Republican Party been damaged by the very public divisions and fissures among conservatives? Gwen Ifill examines the debate with Dan Balz of The Washington Post, John Dickerson of Slate Magazine and CBS News, Molly Ball of The Atlantic, and John Harwood of CNBC and The New York Times.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3141H] Topics: Government Shutdown - Who takes the Rap?; Netanyahu takes on Rouhani. Panelists: Pat Buchanan, Author and Columnist; Mort Zuckerman, US News & World Report; Eleanor Clift, Newsweek. duration 27:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:00 am
    Charlie Rose: The Week [#112] * Benjamin Netanyahu, Israeli Prime Minister
    * Sir Alex Ferguson reflects on his career as manager of Manchester United Football Club
    * Mike Allen on politics
    * The cast of the play "The Glass Menagerie"
    * we remember author Tom Clancy who died earlier this week.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2525H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    America Reframed [#204] The New Public This program follows the lives of the ambitious educators and lively students of Bed Stuy's new Brooklyn Community Arts and Media High School (BCAM) over the course of the founding year, with the filmmakers returning three years later to again document the senior year of that first graduating class. Beginning in August 2006, just days before BCAM will open its doors for the first time. Dr. James O'Brien, former D.J. and point guard turned first-time principal, and his faculty of eight, take to the streets in Bed Stuy, Brooklyn to recruit students. Their enthusiasm is infectious and enticing: strong support for the individual student, a rigorous academic curriculum and unconventional arts electives taught by local artists. While at first running smoothly, as months go by, conflicts arise, and by the end of freshman year, the school's idealistic vision is addressing some issues, but aggravating others. Flash-forward to September 2010, the first day of senior year, the school is complete with 4 grades and 450 students, with a faculty that has grown from 8 to 50. Of the 104 students in their founding class, almost half have transferred or dropped out, leaving a senior class of 60 and only 30 on track to graduate. BCAM has made major adjustments, most notably, more disciplinary structure and no arts electives for seniors. What happens in the 4 years is both compelling and frustrating, and it's what makes The New Public a critical document of the complexities, frustrations and personal dramas that put public education at the center of national debate. What makes a kid or a school succeed are a series of complicated, interconnected dynamics, including, a re-evaluation of how we define success. duration 1:56:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1705] THE SUPREME COURT AND LEGISLATIVE PRAYER - As the US Supreme Court starts its new term, one of the cases it will hear concerns the constitutionality of prayers opening public government meetings. As Tim O'Brien reports, although chaplains may offer invocations at the opening of legislative sessions, a Federal appeals court has ruled that the prayers that have opened the meetings of the Greece, New York town board violate the law because one type of prayer - in this case, overtly Christian - dominates all others. How the Court rules could determine the boundaries of separation between church and state.
    PAKISTAN POLIO CAMPAIGN - Polio, a scourge that once killed millions around the world has been all but wiped out because of the polio vaccine. But in 3 countries, including Pakistan, it remains endemic. Fred de Sam Lazaro reports from Karachi Pakistan on that nation's efforts, with the help of Muslim imams and other leaders, to convince its public to be vaccinated and that vaccine programs are not spy operations or other kinds of plots and are encouraged by and consistent with Islam.
    REACTION TO POPE FRANCIS - The widespread adulation of Pope Francis is assessed by a panel of expert observers for an overflow crowd at Georgetown University. Six months since his election, the panel discusses what has been the influence of Francis on US Catholics and the US government?
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1015] Great Investors Exclusive: Richard Freeman Great Investor Richard Freeman has co-managed the ClearBridge Aggressive Growth Fund since its inception 30 years ago. Twice nominated for Morningstar's Domestic Fund Manager of the Year award, Freeman has been fascinated by the stock market since the age of 13, when he started watching the ticker at a local brokerage firm after school. His admitted obsession with stocks has paid off. ClearBridge Aggressive Growth has delivered market and peer beating results over the decades and is now ranked in the top percentiles for the last one, three and five year periods. In this WT exclusive, Freeman describes his unusual highly concentrated, low turnover approach to investing. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 am
    Truth About Money with Ric Edelman [#305H] Ric Edelman educates a father on fiscal responsibility, and whether it's smarter to fund his kid's college or his own retirement. And a real estate investor with a bucketful of cash wants to know the best way to invest it. Plus astronaut, Dan Barry explains the secret to immortality - it's a giant leap for mankind. And in The Other Side of Money Jean Edelman explains the benefits of a good mental work-out. All that and much more on this episode of Truth about Money with Ric Edelman. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2525H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 10:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3141H] Topics: Government Shutdown - Who takes the Rap?; Netanyahu takes on Rouhani. Panelists: Pat Buchanan, Author and Columnist; Mort Zuckerman, US News & World Report; Eleanor Clift, Newsweek. duration 27:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5314H] Democrats and Republicans don't agree on how to end the government shutdown but leaders from both parties seem to be suggesting the standoff could last for weeks and grow into an even bigger crisis - the possible default by the Treasury if Congress fails to raise the nation's debt ceiling. House Speaker John Boehner (R-OH) insists President Obama owns the shutdown because he is unwilling to negotiate over delaying or defunding the Affordable Care Act as part of a deal to reopen the government. President Barack Obama blames the shutdown on Tea Party Republicans and their ideological opposition to the 2010 healthcare law which was later upheld by the Supreme Court.
    Meanwhile the new online health insurance exchanges at the heart of the standoff on Capitol Hill opened for business on Tuesday. Despite some technical glitches, the White House says more than 6-million people have logged in during the first two days of open enrollment.
    While the political blame game continues in Washington, federal facilities have been shutdown and an estimated 800,000 federal government workers nationwide have been put on furlough.
    What will it take to bridge partisan differences to breakthrough the political deadlock? Will the president's declaration that he won't negotiate over the debt ceiling limit his options in coming up with a compromise? And even with a deal, has the Republican Party been damaged by the very public divisions and fissures among conservatives? Gwen Ifill examines the debate with Dan Balz of The Washington Post, John Dickerson of Slate Magazine and CBS News, Molly Ball of The Atlantic, and John Harwood of CNBC and The New York Times.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    Conversation with Michael Krasny The host of KQED Public Radio's "Forum" sits down with Dave Iverson to discuss his career and share some of his favorite stories. duration 24:01   STEREO TVG
  • 11:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#239H] Wendell Berry: Poet & Prophet Wendell Berry, a quiet and humble man, has become an outspoken advocate for revolution. He urges immediate action as he mourns how America has turned its back on the land and rejected Jeffersonian principles of respect for the environment and sustainable agriculture. Berry warns, "People who own the world outright for profit will have to be stopped; by influence, by power, by us." In a rare television interview, this visionary, author - and farmer - discusses a sensible, but no-compromise plan to save the Earth.
    This week, Bill Moyers profiles this passionate advocate, a man of the land and one of America's most influential writers, whose prolific career includes more than forty books of poetry, novels, short stories, and essays. This one-on-one conversation was taped at Kentucky's St. Catharine College during a two-day celebrating Wendell Berry's life and ideas and marking the 35th anniversary of the publication of his landmark book, The Unsettling of America.
    Berry, described by environmental activist Bill McKibben as "a prophet of responsibility, " lives and works on the Kentucky farm where his family has tilled the soil for 200 years. He's a man of action as well as words. In 2011, he joined a four-day sit-in at the Kentucky governor's office to protest mountaintop mining, a brutally destructive method of extracting coal. Moyers explores Berry's views on civil disobedience as well as his strong opposition to agribusiness and massive industrial farms, as well as his support for sustainable farming and the local food movement.
    "It's mighty hard right now to think of anything that's precious that isn't endangered," Berry tells Moyers. "There are no sacred and unsacred places; there are only sacred and desecrated places. My belief is that the world and our life in it are conditional gifts. We have the world to live in on the condition that we will take good care of it. And to take good care of it we have to know it. And to know it and to be willing to take care of it, we have to love it."
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:30 pm
    QUEST [#106H] Nanotechnology Takes Off and Journey into Darkness * From Lawrence Berkeley National Labs to Silicon Valley, researchers are manipulating particles at the atomic level, ushering in potential cures for cancer, clothes that don't stain, and solar panels as thick as a sheet of paper.
    * How do you prepare someone who is becoming blind? Quest follows seeing adults through their physical and psychological training as they learn to live in a world without sight.
    * Though you may not believe it, the Bay Area was home to the last whale hunting fleet in the United States - only a generation ago. Quest investigates how Richmond, California was part of a historic moment, and what remains today.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 1:00 pm
    Nova scienceNOW [#606H] What Will The Future Be Like? Mobile phones that read your mind? Video games that can cure cancer? Wearable robots that give you the strength of Ironman? David Pogue investigates which technologies are likely to transform daily life for you -- and your grandkids. They're already taking shape in laboratories around the world -- and gadgets that once were purely science fiction are on the verge of becoming as common as the iPhones and Androids Pogue reviews every day. What technological hurdles must engineers and computer scientists overcome before robots, mind-readers and holograms are all around us? And what will it mean to us as humans if we become even more entrenched in a 24/7 digital world? duration 55:16   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 2:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1213] Food Hour: Vietnam Megan starts her culinary tour of Vietnam in the Mekong Delta. Her first stop is Ho Chi Minh City where she visits the Pho Binh noodle shop, which also served as a resistance headquarters during the Vietnam War. Next it's off to Hue in central Vietnam where Megan samples the region's "Imperial" cuisine and then travels to Hanoi. She treks further north to Bac Ha, attends a traditional banquet hosted by the Flower H'mong tribe and ends her journey with a seafood feast in the scenic Ha Long Bay. duration 57:04   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 3:00 pm
    Nature [#3005H] Attenborough's Life Stories: Life On Camera This mini-series focuses on three fields that David Attenborough feels have been transformed most profoundly: filmmaking, science and the environment. Richly illustrated with the sequences he has spent 60 years capturing (re-mastered for the first time in HD), with new interviews in which he revisits the content, stories and locations that were featured in his landmark series and packed with the personal anecdotes of the BBC's most accomplished raconteur, this series will be a synopsis of a unique half-century. duration 56:16   SRND51 TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 4:00 pm
    Nova [#3715H] Secrets of Stonehenge Every year, a million visitors are drawn to the Salisbury Plain, in southern England, to gaze upon a mysterious circle of stones. Stonehenge may be the best-known and most mysterious relic of prehistory. During the 20th century, excavations revealed that the structure was built in stages and that it dates back some 5000 years, to the late Stone Age. The meaning of the monument, however, was anyone's guess - until recently. Now investigations inside and around Stonehenge have kicked off a dramatic new era of discovery and debate. Who built Stonehenge? What was its purpose? How did prehistoric people quarry, transport, sculpt and erect the giant stones? A new generation of researchers is tackling these questions, finding important clues in the landscape surrounding Stonehenge - one of the densest concentrations of prehistoric structures in the world. The story of Stonehenge is being rewritten. duration 56:16   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 5:00 pm
    Nova [#3916H] Inside The Megastorm Was Hurricane Sandy a freak combination of weather systems? Or are hurricanes increasing in intensity due to a warming climate? How did this perfect storm make search and rescue so dangerous? This episode takes viewers moment by moment through Hurricane Sandy, its impacts, and the future of storm protection. Through first person accounts from those who survived, and from experts and scientists, it gives scientific context to a new breed of storms. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour Weekend [#110H] Included: who needs college anyway? Correspondent Mona Iskander reports on Enstitute, a two-year apprenticeship program that matches young people ages 18-24 with some of New York's top entrepreneurs. That, and the weekend's news, online and on-air. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Conversation with Michael Krasny The host of KQED Public Radio's "Forum" sits down with Dave Iverson to discuss his career and share some of his favorite stories. duration 24:01   STEREO TVG
  • 7:00 pm
    Aspen Institute Presents [#205] Privacy, Safety, and the Law Privacy or Safety? The continuing talk of the controversial issue is brought into question in the fifth and final episode of WORLD Channel's second season of The Aspen Institute Presents. The BBC's Jon Stewart hosts Privacy, Safety, and the Law, which weighs the importance of privacy and safety for both the government and citizens of the United States. National security experts, including former U.S. Representative of California Jane Harman, The Aspen Institute's Executive Vice President Elliott Gerson, former U.S. naval Vice Admiral Mike McConnell and national correspondent James Fallows of The Atlantic contribute to the conversation on if We Are Safe? in the nation. Legal commentator Jeffrey Rossen debates law professor Tim Wu over Matter of Debate: Is Privacy Paramount or Should We Live in a Transparent Society?, moderated by Jim Halpert. duration 56:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#239H] Wendell Berry: Poet & Prophet Wendell Berry, a quiet and humble man, has become an outspoken advocate for revolution. He urges immediate action as he mourns how America has turned its back on the land and rejected Jeffersonian principles of respect for the environment and sustainable agriculture. Berry warns, "People who own the world outright for profit will have to be stopped; by influence, by power, by us." In a rare television interview, this visionary, author - and farmer - discusses a sensible, but no-compromise plan to save the Earth.
    This week, Bill Moyers profiles this passionate advocate, a man of the land and one of America's most influential writers, whose prolific career includes more than forty books of poetry, novels, short stories, and essays. This one-on-one conversation was taped at Kentucky's St. Catharine College during a two-day celebrating Wendell Berry's life and ideas and marking the 35th anniversary of the publication of his landmark book, The Unsettling of America.
    Berry, described by environmental activist Bill McKibben as "a prophet of responsibility, " lives and works on the Kentucky farm where his family has tilled the soil for 200 years. He's a man of action as well as words. In 2011, he joined a four-day sit-in at the Kentucky governor's office to protest mountaintop mining, a brutally destructive method of extracting coal. Moyers explores Berry's views on civil disobedience as well as his strong opposition to agribusiness and massive industrial farms, as well as his support for sustainable farming and the local food movement.
    "It's mighty hard right now to think of anything that's precious that isn't endangered," Berry tells Moyers. "There are no sacred and unsacred places; there are only sacred and desecrated places. My belief is that the world and our life in it are conditional gifts. We have the world to live in on the condition that we will take good care of it. And to take good care of it we have to know it. And to know it and to be willing to take care of it, we have to love it."
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 pm
    America Reframed [#204] The New Public This program follows the lives of the ambitious educators and lively students of Bed Stuy's new Brooklyn Community Arts and Media High School (BCAM) over the course of the founding year, with the filmmakers returning three years later to again document the senior year of that first graduating class. Beginning in August 2006, just days before BCAM will open its doors for the first time. Dr. James O'Brien, former D.J. and point guard turned first-time principal, and his faculty of eight, take to the streets in Bed Stuy, Brooklyn to recruit students. Their enthusiasm is infectious and enticing: strong support for the individual student, a rigorous academic curriculum and unconventional arts electives taught by local artists. While at first running smoothly, as months go by, conflicts arise, and by the end of freshman year, the school's idealistic vision is addressing some issues, but aggravating others. Flash-forward to September 2010, the first day of senior year, the school is complete with 4 grades and 450 students, with a faculty that has grown from 8 to 50. Of the 104 students in their founding class, almost half have transferred or dropped out, leaving a senior class of 60 and only 30 on track to graduate. BCAM has made major adjustments, most notably, more disciplinary structure and no arts electives for seniors. What happens in the 4 years is both compelling and frustrating, and it's what makes The New Public a critical document of the complexities, frustrations and personal dramas that put public education at the center of national debate. What makes a kid or a school succeed are a series of complicated, interconnected dynamics, including, a re-evaluation of how we define success. duration 1:56:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 11:00 pm
    Global Voices [#609] The Lost Dream Documentarian Jehan Harney profiles two Iraqi refugees in Washington DC, who were labeled traitors by Al-Qaeda-affiliated groups and Iraqi insurgents due to their support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. duration 56:36   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:00 am
    2501 Migrants: A Journey Each day, thousands of primarily poor and young Mexicans abandon their native homes in search of jobs and the promise of a brighter economic future. In their wake, they leave behind the hollow footprints of a cultural and domestic abandonment. This documentary explores questions of art and indigenous community in the context of global migration. It chronicles the personal experience of Oaxacan artist Alejandro Santiago. After more than a decade living abroad, Santiago returned to his village, only to find a virtual ghost town of abandoned houses, empty streets and deserted farm fields. Santiago's sense of emptiness inspired him to search for answers through his art. In response, he created "2501 Migrants," a monumental installation art piece comprised of 2501 life-size clay sculptures, with each statue symbolizing a migrant who left his village. duration 55:37   STEREO TVPG
Sunday, October 6, 2013

Navigate By Date

Calendar is loading...
Become a KQED sponsor

TV Technical Issues

TV
    TV Technical Issues
    • DT9s: Sutro Tower testing, early Tues 4/22 1am-5am

      (DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3) KQED (and 3 other local Bay Area stations) will be doing full-load testing on new equipment at Sutro Tower early Tues 4/22 between 1am & 5am. If all goes as planned the KQED transmitter will go off twice during the early part of this period for between 15 and 30 seconds each […]

    • KQED DT9 planned, very short outages, Tues 4/15 (& possibly Wed 4/16)

      (DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3) KQED DT9′s Over the Air (OTA) signal from Sutro Tower will experience a few extremely brief outages on Tuesday 4/15 between 10am and 5pm (and possibly on Wed 4/16 if the work cannot be completed in 1 day). Each outage should be measurable in seconds (not minutes). This work will not affect […]

    • KQET DT25 Planned Outage: early Tues 4/15 (btwn 5am-6am)

      (DT 25.1, 25.2, 25.3) At some point between 5am and 6am early Tuesday 4/15, KQET’s signal from the transmitter on Fremont Peak northeast of Monterey will shut down for a short period of time to allow AT&T to do work on our fiber interface. The outage should be relatively short, but its precise start time […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Comcast 9 and 709
Digital 9.1, 54.2 or 25.1

All widescreen and HD programs

KQED Plus

Channel 54
Comcast 10 and 710
Digital 9.2, 54.1 or 25.2

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life
Comcast 189
Digital 54.3

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Comcast 190
Digital 9.3

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Comcast 191 & 621
Digital 54.5 or 25.3

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Comcast 192
Digital 54.4

Quality children's programming parents love too