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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus. Read more about this transition on our FAQ page.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Monday, May 20, 2013

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Monday, May 20, 2013
  • 12:30 am
    Little Manila: Filipinos In California's Heartland Filled with chop suey houses, gambling dens, and dance halls, Little Manila was the area in Stockton notoriously called, Skid Row, but it was also the closest thing Filipinos had to a hometown. In its heyday in the 30s, this lively area had the largest population of Filipinos outside of the Philippines. This program tells the story of Jimmy Ente, Jr., a longtime Stockton resident recruited to work in the asparagus fields. Jimmy, and many other like him, faced backbreaking work, low wages, and at times extreme racism to fulfill their dreams. Narrated by famed Filipino-American producer Dean Devlin, this documentary tells the immigrant story as Filipinos experienced it. duration 26:45   STEREO TVG
  • 1:00 am
    Key Ingredients Most of us don't give a second thought about the wealth of history and culture that shapes our dining habits and taste preferences. Our recipes, menus, ceremonies, and etiquette are directly shaped by our country's rich immigrant experience, the history and innovations of food preparation technology, and the ever changing availability of key ingredients. Key ingredients explores four aspects of our complex relationship with food:
    * Entrepreneurial Spirit - Many people prefer to eat foods grown by people they know using local resources.
    * Eating Implications - If you are what you eat, does it also matter when, where , and with whom you eat?
    * Seed Savers - Who are the keepers of the seeds? And are older varieties of seeds important?
    * Economic Efficiencies - Do we sacrifice lifestyle and sense of community when we strive for efficiency in agriculture?
    duration 29:00   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Indelible Lalita This program tells the story of a beautiful woman whose resilient spirit survives her body's transformation by cancer, heart failure, and a dramatic loss of skin pigment. Meditatively flowing between surface and interior, it follows Lalita as she migrates from Bombay to Paris to Montreal, and becomes completely White along the way. Lalita learns to let go of her body as the sign of her ethnicity and femininity, and ultimately realizes that her body is just a temporary vessel for her spirit. duration 1:26:34   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Newsline [#4036] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2905] Tavis talks with one of rap's most in-demand performers, Talib Kweli, The socially aware MC explains his long absence from recording and the challenges he issues with his new CD, "Prisoner of Conscious." Tavis also chats with award-winning environment and science journalist Dan Fagin. A winner of both of America's best-known science journalism prizes, Fagin recaps the story he tells in his new text, Toms River. duration 26:46   STEREO
  • 4:00 am
    LinkAsia [#95] duration 26:46   STEREO
  • 4:30 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1637] THE BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA - The national council of the Boy Scouts of America will vote next week on a proposal to lift the long-standing ban on gay scouts, although allowing gay adult leaders is not under consideration. As Deborah Potter reports, most scout troops are sponsored by faith-based groups, some of whom say that lifting the ban is incompatible with scout values, and could lead them to withdraw their sponsorship.
    SEQUESTRATION AND THE POOR - The $ 85 billion federal spending cuts imposed by sequestration will severely impact city governments and their programs for the poor-programs like Head Start, supplemental nutrition and public housing. The head of Catholic Charities in Maryland tells Lucky Severson that his budget is a "moral document" and that failure to ease the cuts on programs for the poor is "frankly immoral."
    REFORMING WASHINGTON - Host Bob Abernethy profiles former White House press secretary Mike McCurry. McCurry has a new graduate degree from Wesley Seminary and wants to change Washington's political climate. < br />SIKH TURBAN SHOWDOWN - At a Sikh Foundation of Virginia "Turban Showdown," Sikh parents helped children wrap their turbans. Youth and education coordinator Surinder Singh explains the meaning of the turban and why, for Sikhs, it is a mark of pride, respect and responsibility.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    Appalachians [#101] Appalachia was America's first frontier. The Appalachian mountains include the Alleghenies, the Cumberlands, the Blue Ridge and the Great Smokies. It is an ancient range, rugged and beautiful. For centuries, it was home to many Indian tribes, including Shawnee, Choctaw, Creek and Cherokee.
    In the 17th century, European explorers and traders came into Appalachia; they traded and intermarried with the Indians. By the 1740's, streams of immigrants left England, Ireland, Scotland, Germany and Wales seeking a better life in the new world. The population in the mountains swelled and it was more difficult to share resources. The British, the Indians and settlers endured decades of combat on the Appalachian frontier, which marked the edge of British territory in the colonies.
    One of the dominant groups in the mountains was the Scotch-Irish. The early pioneers brought their folkways and their music from the old country. Mountain life was isolated, and traditional culture was preserved. The old ballads and fiddle tunes were greatly beloved, and handed down through generations.
    The men of Appalachia fought bravely in the American Revolution. Afterwards, they railed at taxes and regulations imposed by the new American government. They found comfort in religion, which was enlivened by a series of evangelical revivals in the 18th and early 19th centuries. Traditional music was mingled with the rhythms used by African slaves, and a glorious new gospel music was born.
    duration 56:42   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    Appalachians [#102] The story of Appalachia is about the struggle over land. In the 1830's, the growing nation set its sights on land that was still owned by the Indians. President Andrew Jackson, himself a son of Appalachia, ordered the removal of the Cherokee from their mountain homes and marched them to settle in what is now Oklahoma.
    Slavery and other social and economic differences were widening the gap between the American north and south. There were fewer slaves in the hilly Appalachian region than in plantations farther south, but the mountains would become a fierce Civil War battleground. Members of the same family fought for the Union and for the Confederacy. It was a time of violence and chaos, leaving scars on mountain life for years to come.
    After the Civil War, industrialization came to Appalachia. Railroads were built, forests were cut, and outside owners bought up the land. During the boom, a conflict between two timbering families, the Hatfields and the McCoys, was called a `blood feud' and turned into legend. Outsiders created the stereotype of a stupid, violent hillbilly, an image that was seriously damaging to the people of Appalachia.
    But timbering and coal mining brought jobs to the region. Through the early part of the 20th century, men left their farms for a regular wage, but they found their lives controlled by the coal companies. The United Mine Workers tried to organize, but it was resisted by the owners, often with violence. Resentments grew, and exploded in a series of devastating strikes known as the `great coal wars'.
    Through their struggles, the people of Appalachia held on to their love of land and family. Music continued to have great meaning for them, and they often adapted old, traditional ballads into songs that told the story of their lives in America.
    duration 56:42   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 7:00 am
    Appalachians [#103] At the turn of the 20th century, the phonograph and the radio exposed the mountain people to new influences, and took mountain music across America. Stars like Jimmie Rodgers and the Carter Family began making records. And it was a radio program at WSM in Nashville, Tennessee, that gave birth to the Grand Ole Opry.
    But times were hard, and Appalachia fell into an economic depression even before the rest of the country. President Roosevelt's New Deal was a great boon to the region. The TVA brought electricity into the mountain hollers; the WPA and the CCC offered jobs and built infrastructure. Roosevelt was a hero in Appalachia, and many wondered how they would have survived without the New Deal.
    World War II took many young people from the mountains. After the war, underground mines were mechanized, and miners were laid off. Throughout the 1950's, people flocked to the big cities in search of work. For those who tried to stay home, it became harder to hold on to their land. State and federal governments claimed property for dams; family farmsteads were flooded, and more people moved away. It was one of the largest internal migrations in American history, and left many Appalachian people displaced in an urban world.
    The War on Poverty in the 1960's again sent federal aid into Appalachia. But television and magazines showed painful images of hunger and poverty, reinforcing the stereotype of the poor hillbilly.
    The nation still has a need for coal, and methods have been found to produce it more cheaply and efficiently. In the 1950's, it was strip-mining, and for the past thirty years it has been a process that opponents call `mountain-top removal.' The rich land of Appalachia has been a magnet for investors, and the great majority of land in the region is now in the hands of outsiders.
    In recent years, life has improved in Appalachia, though there is still severe poverty in remote areas. But the cities are vibrant, and traditional culture is being revived. Three centuries of history live on, in the songs of the mountain people.
    duration 56:40   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 8:00 am
    1962 World's Fair: When Seattle Invented The Future The 1962 World's Fair, a 6-month celebration of science and technology, featured an exciting mix of culture, cuisine and celebrity, drawing more than 10 million visitors from around the world to the then relatively unknown mill town of Seattle. Through historical photographs and archival footage, this program brings to life the textures and sounds of Seattle in the late 1950s and early '60s.
    The city's business, civic and cultural leaders, historians and longtime residents reminisce about the excitement and ambition the Fair ignited. Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen credits seeing the 605-foot Space Needle, Monorail, "Bubbleator" and other exhibits for inspiring his love of technology and science. Public television's own Rick Steves shares his vivid memory of seeing "exotic" Belgian Waffles for the first time at The Food Circus. The Fair also offered an eclectic mix of high art and low culture, from opera concerts and paintings by Roy Lichtenstein and Jasper Johns, to Gracie Hanson's racy Vegas-style nightclub revue and an adult puppet show. The documentary includes rare footage captured at the fair, including appearances by Space Age hero John Glenn; politicians Adlai Stevenson, Richard Nixon, Lyndon Johnson, Robert Kennedy and Hubert H. Humphrey; journalist Edward R. Murrow; the Duke of Edinburgh; and beloved performers Roy Rogers and Dale Evans, Peggy Lee, Lawrence Welk, the Lennon Sisters, Bob Hope, Miles Davis and Elvis.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:00 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2905] Tavis talks with one of rap's most in-demand performers, Talib Kweli, The socially aware MC explains his long absence from recording and the challenges he issues with his new CD, "Prisoner of Conscious." Tavis also chats with award-winning environment and science journalist Dan Fagin. A winner of both of America's best-known science journalism prizes, Fagin recaps the story he tells in his new text, Toms River. duration 26:46   STEREO
  • 9:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2904] Tavis talks with surgeon and breast cancer expert Dr. Susan Love. A longtime advocate of preventive breast cancer research, Love describes her personal journey as a cancer patient. Tavis also chats with economist Peter Blair Henry. The dean of NYU's Stern School of Business, Henry unpacks his book, Turnaround: Third World Lessons for First World Growth. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:00 am
    LinkAsia [#95] duration 26:46   STEREO
  • 10:30 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1637] THE BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA - The national council of the Boy Scouts of America will vote next week on a proposal to lift the long-standing ban on gay scouts, although allowing gay adult leaders is not under consideration. As Deborah Potter reports, most scout troops are sponsored by faith-based groups, some of whom say that lifting the ban is incompatible with scout values, and could lead them to withdraw their sponsorship.
    SEQUESTRATION AND THE POOR - The $ 85 billion federal spending cuts imposed by sequestration will severely impact city governments and their programs for the poor-programs like Head Start, supplemental nutrition and public housing. The head of Catholic Charities in Maryland tells Lucky Severson that his budget is a "moral document" and that failure to ease the cuts on programs for the poor is "frankly immoral."
    REFORMING WASHINGTON - Host Bob Abernethy profiles former White House press secretary Mike McCurry. McCurry has a new graduate degree from Wesley Seminary and wants to change Washington's political climate. < br />SIKH TURBAN SHOWDOWN - At a Sikh Foundation of Virginia "Turban Showdown," Sikh parents helped children wrap their turbans. Youth and education coordinator Surinder Singh explains the meaning of the turban and why, for Sikhs, it is a mark of pride, respect and responsibility.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 11:00 am
    Appalachians [#101] Appalachia was America's first frontier. The Appalachian mountains include the Alleghenies, the Cumberlands, the Blue Ridge and the Great Smokies. It is an ancient range, rugged and beautiful. For centuries, it was home to many Indian tribes, including Shawnee, Choctaw, Creek and Cherokee.
    In the 17th century, European explorers and traders came into Appalachia; they traded and intermarried with the Indians. By the 1740's, streams of immigrants left England, Ireland, Scotland, Germany and Wales seeking a better life in the new world. The population in the mountains swelled and it was more difficult to share resources. The British, the Indians and settlers endured decades of combat on the Appalachian frontier, which marked the edge of British territory in the colonies.
    One of the dominant groups in the mountains was the Scotch-Irish. The early pioneers brought their folkways and their music from the old country. Mountain life was isolated, and traditional culture was preserved. The old ballads and fiddle tunes were greatly beloved, and handed down through generations.
    The men of Appalachia fought bravely in the American Revolution. Afterwards, they railed at taxes and regulations imposed by the new American government. They found comfort in religion, which was enlivened by a series of evangelical revivals in the 18th and early 19th centuries. Traditional music was mingled with the rhythms used by African slaves, and a glorious new gospel music was born.
    duration 56:42   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Appalachians [#102] The story of Appalachia is about the struggle over land. In the 1830's, the growing nation set its sights on land that was still owned by the Indians. President Andrew Jackson, himself a son of Appalachia, ordered the removal of the Cherokee from their mountain homes and marched them to settle in what is now Oklahoma.
    Slavery and other social and economic differences were widening the gap between the American north and south. There were fewer slaves in the hilly Appalachian region than in plantations farther south, but the mountains would become a fierce Civil War battleground. Members of the same family fought for the Union and for the Confederacy. It was a time of violence and chaos, leaving scars on mountain life for years to come.
    After the Civil War, industrialization came to Appalachia. Railroads were built, forests were cut, and outside owners bought up the land. During the boom, a conflict between two timbering families, the Hatfields and the McCoys, was called a `blood feud' and turned into legend. Outsiders created the stereotype of a stupid, violent hillbilly, an image that was seriously damaging to the people of Appalachia.
    But timbering and coal mining brought jobs to the region. Through the early part of the 20th century, men left their farms for a regular wage, but they found their lives controlled by the coal companies. The United Mine Workers tried to organize, but it was resisted by the owners, often with violence. Resentments grew, and exploded in a series of devastating strikes known as the `great coal wars'.
    Through their struggles, the people of Appalachia held on to their love of land and family. Music continued to have great meaning for them, and they often adapted old, traditional ballads into songs that told the story of their lives in America.
    duration 56:42   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 1:00 pm
    Appalachians [#103] At the turn of the 20th century, the phonograph and the radio exposed the mountain people to new influences, and took mountain music across America. Stars like Jimmie Rodgers and the Carter Family began making records. And it was a radio program at WSM in Nashville, Tennessee, that gave birth to the Grand Ole Opry.
    But times were hard, and Appalachia fell into an economic depression even before the rest of the country. President Roosevelt's New Deal was a great boon to the region. The TVA brought electricity into the mountain hollers; the WPA and the CCC offered jobs and built infrastructure. Roosevelt was a hero in Appalachia, and many wondered how they would have survived without the New Deal.
    World War II took many young people from the mountains. After the war, underground mines were mechanized, and miners were laid off. Throughout the 1950's, people flocked to the big cities in search of work. For those who tried to stay home, it became harder to hold on to their land. State and federal governments claimed property for dams; family farmsteads were flooded, and more people moved away. It was one of the largest internal migrations in American history, and left many Appalachian people displaced in an urban world.
    The War on Poverty in the 1960's again sent federal aid into Appalachia. But television and magazines showed painful images of hunger and poverty, reinforcing the stereotype of the poor hillbilly.
    The nation still has a need for coal, and methods have been found to produce it more cheaply and efficiently. In the 1950's, it was strip-mining, and for the past thirty years it has been a process that opponents call `mountain-top removal.' The rich land of Appalachia has been a magnet for investors, and the great majority of land in the region is now in the hands of outsiders.
    In recent years, life has improved in Appalachia, though there is still severe poverty in remote areas. But the cities are vibrant, and traditional culture is being revived. Three centuries of history live on, in the songs of the mountain people.
    duration 56:40   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 2:00 pm
    Newsline [#4036] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 2:30 pm
    Journal [#9100] duration 28:10   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 pm
    Tavis Smiley [#2905] Tavis talks with one of rap's most in-demand performers, Talib Kweli, The socially aware MC explains his long absence from recording and the challenges he issues with his new CD, "Prisoner of Conscious." Tavis also chats with award-winning environment and science journalist Dan Fagin. A winner of both of America's best-known science journalism prizes, Fagin recaps the story he tells in his new text, Toms River. duration 26:46   STEREO
  • 3:30 pm
    Nightly Business Report [#32119] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, CEOs that are making headlines. First, Yahoo's Marissa Mayer - will her billion dollar bet on a blog site payoff for investors? And NBR will look at what Apple CEO Tim Cook is expected to say on Capitol Hill tomorrow about overhauling the tax code and his big pile of cash sitting overseas. Also tonight, we'll take you inside the Dreamliner's first flight since the jet was grounded four months ago. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#10631] Syrian Violence * Blog Platform Bought by Yahoo! * Myanmar's President at the White House * Coding as a Civic Duty * Diagnosing Mental Disorders * Women in Science duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 pm
    Nightly Business Report [#32119] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, CEOs that are making headlines. First, Yahoo's Marissa Mayer - will her billion dollar bet on a blog site payoff for investors? And NBR will look at what Apple CEO Tim Cook is expected to say on Capitol Hill tomorrow about overhauling the tax code and his big pile of cash sitting overseas. Also tonight, we'll take you inside the Dreamliner's first flight since the jet was grounded four months ago. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:30 pm
    Democracy Now! [#2211] duration 59:00   STEREO TVRE
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Newsline [#4036] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3341] duration 1:00  
  • 7:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#10631] Syrian Violence * Blog Platform Bought by Yahoo! * Myanmar's President at the White House * Coding as a Civic Duty * Diagnosing Mental Disorders * Women in Science duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:57 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3341] duration 1:00  
  • 8:00 pm
    Charlie Rose [#19106] (original broadcast date: 5/20/13)
    * Ben Wedeman, CNN Senior International Correspondent and Farnaz Fassihi, Senior Middle East Correspondent for The Wall Street Journal on the Middle East
    * a look at US-China relations over the next 10 years with Michael Spence of NYU Stern School of Business and Tung Chee Hwa, Former Chief Executive, Hong Kong.
    duration 56:47   STEREO TVRE
  • 8:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3341] duration 1:00  
  • 9:00 pm
    Tavis Smiley [#2906] Tavis talks with Maine's former US senator Olympia Snowe. The outspoken centrist weighs in on why Washington isn't solving the big problems and offers solutions from her text, Fighting for the Common Good. Tavis also chats with Grammy-winning jazz artist Terence Blanchard. The five-time Grammy winner reflects on pushing musical boundaries with his new CD, "Magnetic," and composing his first opera, the jazz-infused Champion. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:28 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3341] duration 1:00  
  • 9:30 pm
    Roadtrip Nation [#810H] Seattle, WA / Santa Fe, NM While in Seattle, WA, the team connects with Miss Indigo Blue, a renowned burlesque instructor and performer, and discovers why she decided to take up the bold art form. Her story particularly intrigues Carolyn who finds Miss Indigo Blue's confidence and fearlessness desirable. In Santa Fe, NM, the Roadtrippers link up with Kenny Ausubel and Nina Simons, co-founders of Bioneers, an organization that brings scientific innovators together to promote social and environmental change. Their story of risk-taking resonates with Sarah who realizes that maybe she "doesn't have to play it so safe." duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3341] duration 1:00  
  • 10:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#10631] Syrian Violence * Blog Platform Bought by Yahoo! * Myanmar's President at the White House * Coding as a Civic Duty * Diagnosing Mental Disorders * Women in Science duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:57 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3341] duration 1:00  
  • 11:00 pm
    Democracy Now! [#2211] duration 59:00   STEREO TVRE
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10631] Syrian Violence * Blog Platform Bought by Yahoo! * Myanmar's President at the White House * Coding as a Civic Duty * Diagnosing Mental Disorders * Women in Science duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
Monday, May 20, 2013

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TV Technical Issues

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    TV Technical Issues
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    • Occasional sound issues, Comcast Cable, Black remote control

      Originally posted 6/19/2013: Some Comcast Basic Cable customers around the Bay Area have reported audio issues with KQED and KQED Plus, on channels 9 and 10. The problem is not related to KQED’s transmission but may be caused by the language setting on your Comcast remote control. If your Comcast remote control is black, please […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Comcast 9 and 709
Digital 9.1, 54.2 or 25.1

All widescreen and HD programs

KQED Plus

Channel 54
Comcast 10 and 710
Digital 9.2, 54.1 or 25.2

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life
Comcast 189
Digital 54.3

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Comcast 190
Digital 9.3

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Comcast 191 & 621
Digital 54.5 or 25.3

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Comcast 192
Digital 54.4

Quality children's programming parents love too