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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

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KQED World: Sunday, March 17, 2013

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Sunday, March 17, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    American Masters [#2203] Neil Young: Don't Be Denied Neil Young grants rare and unprecedented access for this documentary in which he traces his musical journey in his own words. The film includes new interviews shot in New York and California and utilizes previously unseen performance footage from the star's own extensive archives. It also features cohorts Stephen Stills, Graham Nash, David Crosby, Nils Lofgren and James Taylor. From his first success with Buffalo Springfield to the bi-polar opposites of mega-stardom with Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young and the soulful rock of Crazy Horse, Young's career has enjoyed many guises. The film takes Young through his rise in the '60's, his solo artist period in the '70's, his '80's embrace of the New Wave, and it ends with Young still refusing to be denied, pursuing a more eclectic musical approach but also touring in the USA with Crosby Stills Nash & Young and teaming on occasion with Crazy Horse. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    American Masters [#2502] Cab Calloway: Sketches "Hi de hi de hi de ho," the popular refrain from "Minnie the Moocher" was Cab Calloway's signature song and Harlem's famous Cotton Club was his home stage. A singer, dancer and band leader, Calloway was an exceptional figure in the history of jazz -- a consummate musician, he charmed audiences across the world with boundless energy, bravado and elegant showmanship. His back glide dance step is the precursor to Michael Jackson's moonwalk and his scatting lyrics find their legacy in today's hip-hop and rap. An ambassador for his race, Calloway was the first black musician to tour the segregationist South, as early as 1932. At the top of his game in the jazz and swing eras of the 30s and 40s, he toured as Sportin' Life in Porgy and Bess, forever putting his personal stamp on "It Ain't Necessarily So." His career flagged until he was rediscovered in the 1980s Blues Brothers and even on Sesame Street, becoming a new cult hero of sorts. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Teaching Channel Presents [#202] Bullying at School Bullying at School: A look at three innovative approaches to tackling the serious issue of bullying. Visit three schools where parents, teachers and students are implementing bullying prevention programs that are making a big difference in students' lives. duration 57:15   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    America Reframed [#121] Flying: Confessions of a Free Woman| Part 1 In this two part documentary, master storyteller Jennifer Fox lays bare her own turbulent life to penetrate what it means to be a free woman today. As her drama of work and relationships unfolds over four years, our protagonist travels to over seventeen countries to understand how diverse women define their lives when there is no map. Employing an ingenious new camera technique, called "passing the camera", Fox creates a documentary language that mirrors the special way women communicate. Over intimate conversations around kitchen tables from South Africa to Russia, India and Pakistan, she initiates a groundbreaking dialogue among women, illuminating universal concerns across race, class and nationality. duration 2:26:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:30 am
    Global Voices [#520] Family Portrait In Black and White lga Nenya, from a small Ukrainian town, is raising 16 black orphans in a country of Slavic blue-eyed blondes. The reality of growing up as a bi-racial child in Eastern Europe - a rare and truly visible minority - is not for the faint of heart. These children always have to be on guard against the world that surrounds them. duration 53:38   STEREO
  • MORNING
  • 6:30 am
    Hapa: One Step at a Time Race remains a powerful symbol in the US; it still is a shorthand notation for most Americans. This program speaks to how individuals of Asian and Pacific Islander descent are embracing their ethnic experiences as a symbol of change in an ever-evolving multicultural society. It is a thought-provoking exploration of what it means to be a mixed-race American today. The program is a first-person treatment of the struggles people of diverse cultural backgrounds and perspectives face. "Hapa" comes from the Hawaiian phrase hapa haole, which means half white/foreigner. Once considered a derogatory term, Hapa has come to be accepted as a way to describe a person of partial Asian ancestry. By Japanese American Midori Sperandeo, who provides a personal narrative about her evolution from a novice runner into a national class marathoner andshares the parallel path of her personal growth in searching for her racial identity. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 7:00 am
    Need To Know [#311H] The Family Planning Fight Continues In the two weeks since the sequester began and the effects are already being felt. One of the federal programs being cut is funding of family planning clinics - those serving primarily low-income and uninsured individuals. With $15 million in cuts slated to happen over the next year, things such as cancer screenings, testing for sexually transmitted infections, and reproductive health care services might suddenly be unavailable to more than 100,000 primarily low-income women across the country.
    Texas has already been down this road. In 2011, the state legislature slashed the budget for family planning services by $73 million dollars for 2012 and 2013. The result? More than 50 family planning clinics across the state closed. NTK's Mona Iskander traveled there last summer and filed this report.
    Anchor Scott Simon interviews Pam Belluck, a health and science writer for The New York Times, who looks at what's happening to these programs in other states.
    And from "American Voices," Judy Norsigian, one of the authors of "Our Bodies, Ourselves," provides an historical account of women's health policy debates over the past 40 years.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:30 am
    Changing Seas [#301H] Alien Invaders In the waters of the western Atlantic and Caribbean, a voracious alien predator has taken hold. Native to the Indo-Pacific, the invasive lionfish is a major threat to biodiversity and the health of already stressed coral reef ecosystems. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1628] THE NEW POPE - As the College of Cardinals continues to vote on who will be the successor to Benedict XVI, Kim Lawton reports from Rome on what different Catholics are expecting from the new Pope - where should he be from and what kind of person would be best suited to lead the Church in this time of crisis?
    NONE OF THE ABOVE: RELIGIOUS IMPLICATIONS - In this concluding segment of a 3-part miniseries, Deborah Potter looks at how the rapidly growing numbers of the religiously unaffiliated, especially among younger individuals, could affect churches and the roles of pastors. These so-called "nones" now make up nearly 20% of all adult Americans. (Originally aired October 26, 2012)
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#938] Maximizing Social Security Benefits This week's WT explores philanthropy as an investment. Two philanthropy thought leaders, Jack Lund, CEO of the YMCA of Greater New York, and Doug Bauer, Executive Director of the Clark Foundation, share advice on how to get the best return from your giving. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 am
    Truth About Money with Ric Edelman [#207H] Ric Edelman and his team explore the reality behind Broadway's bright lights. Then, comedian Shahyrar takes a humorous look at when to have kids. In addition, Ric interviews former "Biggest Loser" trainer, Jillian Michaels, on the right - and wrong - advice to take when building a business. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2448] duration 26:46   TVG
  • 10:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3112] TOPICS: Congressional Budget Battles; Habemus Papa! PANELISTS: Mort Zuckerman, US News & World Report; Eleanor Clift, Newsweek; Paul Glastris, Washington Monthly; Tim Carney, The Washington Examiner. duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    Washington Week [#5237H] * President Barack Obama continued his "charm offensive" this week meeting with House Republicans and Democrats on Capitol Hill. While the president tried to broker a bipartisan budget deal, House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan unveiled a new GOP budget proposal and Senator Patty Murray unveiled the Democratic blueprint. The reactions by both Democrats and Republicans: neither budget is likely to become law. So what will it take to bridge the partisan divide and reach a compromise?
    * Republicans are meeting just outside Washington this week for the annual Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC). Most of the focus will be about finding a way forward for the Republican Party. It will also be a chance for the rising stars of the party like Florida Senator Marco Rubio and Kentucky Senator Rand Paul to rally support from conservative activists for their potential 2016 presidential runs. Also scheduled to speak at CPAC: Paul Ryan, Jeb Bush, the NRA's Wayne LaPierre, Sarah Palin, Donald Trump and Mitt Romney.
    Joining Gwen Ifill to report on the uphill battle to reach a bipartisan budget deal, CPAC, and Organizing for Action (OFA), an Obama campaign organization turned advocacy group, and the role it is playing in promoting the president's second-term agenda: John Dickerson of Slate Magazine and CBS News, Amy Walter of the Cook Political Report, and Jeanne Cummings of Bloomberg News.
    duration 24:10   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2421] March 15, 2013 Guest Host: Scott Shafer.
    News Panel:
    CITY COLLEGE OF SAN FRANCISCO STRUGGLES - Will City College of San Francisco make the grade and keep its accreditation? The Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges has recommended fourteen controversial changes which include layoffs, financial reform, and campus closures. Friday is the deadline for the embattled college to turn in its report showing how the suggested reforms have been and will be implemented.
    SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY MUSICIANS STRIKE - SF Symphony musicians went on strike this week, putting an upcoming high profile tour to the East Coast in jeopardy. Without a contract since February, the union representing the performers says management's new proposals are not on par with comparable orchestras, like those in Los Angeles and Chicago.
    BUDGET CUTS TO CALIFORNIA COURTS - California's top judge, Chief Justice Tani Cantil-Sakauye, made the case before state lawmakers this week to restore funding to the courts. More than $1 billion in cuts over the past five years has resulted in court closures, reduced hours and layoffs. Gov. Brown's budget this year would reduce court construction funds by $200 million.
    Guests: Andrea Koskey, San Francisco Examiner; Josh Richman, Bay Area News Group; Cy Musiker, KQED News.
    IRAQ WAR IN PICTURES - On the eve of the 10th anniversary of the American-led invasion of Iraq, an exhibit of photographs at the De Young Museum in San Francisco takes an intimate look at the impact of war on Iraqi citizens. From young boys rehearsing a play about martyrdom to men playing dominos at dusk, the images in "Eye Level in Iraq" offer a glimpse into everyday life as captured by photojournalists Kael Alford and Thorne Anderson. The museum's chief curator Julian Cox talks about the role of art and journalism and what he hopes viewers will take away from the exhibition.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#210H] Ending The Silence On Climate Change Encore Presentation:
    Remember climate change? The issue barely comes up with any substance in our current political dialogue. But bringing climate change back into our national conversation is as much a communications challenge as it is a scientific one. This week, scientist Anthony Leiserowitz, director of the Yale Project on Climate Change Communication, joins Bill to describe his efforts to galvanize communities over what's arguably the greatest single threat facing humanity. Leiserowitz, who specializes in the psychology of risk perception, knows better than anyone if people are willing to change their behavior to make a difference. "A pervasive sense up to now has been that climate change is distant - distant in time, and distant in space," Leiserowitz tells Bill. "And what we're now beginning to see is that it's not so distant. I have a 9-year-old son - he's going to be my age in the year 2050. I don't want him to live in the world that we're currently hurtling towards."
    duration 52:46   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:30 pm
    Inside Washington [#2448] duration 26:46   TVG
  • 1:00 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3112] TOPICS: Congressional Budget Battles; Habemus Papa! PANELISTS: Mort Zuckerman, US News & World Report; Eleanor Clift, Newsweek; Paul Glastris, Washington Monthly; Tim Carney, The Washington Examiner. duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 1:30 pm
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2201H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 2:00 pm
    LinkAsia [#133] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 2:30 pm
    Changing Seas [#301H] Alien Invaders In the waters of the western Atlantic and Caribbean, a voracious alien predator has taken hold. Native to the Indo-Pacific, the invasive lionfish is a major threat to biodiversity and the health of already stressed coral reef ecosystems. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 pm
    Need To Know [#311H] The Family Planning Fight Continues In the two weeks since the sequester began and the effects are already being felt. One of the federal programs being cut is funding of family planning clinics - those serving primarily low-income and uninsured individuals. With $15 million in cuts slated to happen over the next year, things such as cancer screenings, testing for sexually transmitted infections, and reproductive health care services might suddenly be unavailable to more than 100,000 primarily low-income women across the country.
    Texas has already been down this road. In 2011, the state legislature slashed the budget for family planning services by $73 million dollars for 2012 and 2013. The result? More than 50 family planning clinics across the state closed. NTK's Mona Iskander traveled there last summer and filed this report.
    Anchor Scott Simon interviews Pam Belluck, a health and science writer for The New York Times, who looks at what's happening to these programs in other states.
    And from "American Voices," Judy Norsigian, one of the authors of "Our Bodies, Ourselves," provides an historical account of women's health policy debates over the past 40 years.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 pm
    Moyers & Company [#210H] Ending The Silence On Climate Change Encore Presentation:
    Remember climate change? The issue barely comes up with any substance in our current political dialogue. But bringing climate change back into our national conversation is as much a communications challenge as it is a scientific one. This week, scientist Anthony Leiserowitz, director of the Yale Project on Climate Change Communication, joins Bill to describe his efforts to galvanize communities over what's arguably the greatest single threat facing humanity. Leiserowitz, who specializes in the psychology of risk perception, knows better than anyone if people are willing to change their behavior to make a difference. "A pervasive sense up to now has been that climate change is distant - distant in time, and distant in space," Leiserowitz tells Bill. "And what we're now beginning to see is that it's not so distant. I have a 9-year-old son - he's going to be my age in the year 2050. I don't want him to live in the world that we're currently hurtling towards."
    duration 52:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 pm
    Washington Week [#5237H] * President Barack Obama continued his "charm offensive" this week meeting with House Republicans and Democrats on Capitol Hill. While the president tried to broker a bipartisan budget deal, House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan unveiled a new GOP budget proposal and Senator Patty Murray unveiled the Democratic blueprint. The reactions by both Democrats and Republicans: neither budget is likely to become law. So what will it take to bridge the partisan divide and reach a compromise?
    * Republicans are meeting just outside Washington this week for the annual Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC). Most of the focus will be about finding a way forward for the Republican Party. It will also be a chance for the rising stars of the party like Florida Senator Marco Rubio and Kentucky Senator Rand Paul to rally support from conservative activists for their potential 2016 presidential runs. Also scheduled to speak at CPAC: Paul Ryan, Jeb Bush, the NRA's Wayne LaPierre, Sarah Palin, Donald Trump and Mitt Romney.
    Joining Gwen Ifill to report on the uphill battle to reach a bipartisan budget deal, CPAC, and Organizing for Action (OFA), an Obama campaign organization turned advocacy group, and the role it is playing in promoting the president's second-term agenda: John Dickerson of Slate Magazine and CBS News, Amy Walter of the Cook Political Report, and Jeanne Cummings of Bloomberg News.
    duration 24:10   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:00 pm
    Inside Washington [#2448] duration 26:46   TVG
  • 5:30 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3112] TOPICS: Congressional Budget Battles; Habemus Papa! PANELISTS: Mort Zuckerman, US News & World Report; Eleanor Clift, Newsweek; Paul Glastris, Washington Monthly; Tim Carney, The Washington Examiner. duration 27:30   TVRE
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2421] March 15, 2013 Guest Host: Scott Shafer.
    News Panel:
    CITY COLLEGE OF SAN FRANCISCO STRUGGLES - Will City College of San Francisco make the grade and keep its accreditation? The Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges has recommended fourteen controversial changes which include layoffs, financial reform, and campus closures. Friday is the deadline for the embattled college to turn in its report showing how the suggested reforms have been and will be implemented.
    SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY MUSICIANS STRIKE - SF Symphony musicians went on strike this week, putting an upcoming high profile tour to the East Coast in jeopardy. Without a contract since February, the union representing the performers says management's new proposals are not on par with comparable orchestras, like those in Los Angeles and Chicago.
    BUDGET CUTS TO CALIFORNIA COURTS - California's top judge, Chief Justice Tani Cantil-Sakauye, made the case before state lawmakers this week to restore funding to the courts. More than $1 billion in cuts over the past five years has resulted in court closures, reduced hours and layoffs. Gov. Brown's budget this year would reduce court construction funds by $200 million.
    Guests: Andrea Koskey, San Francisco Examiner; Josh Richman, Bay Area News Group; Cy Musiker, KQED News.
    IRAQ WAR IN PICTURES - On the eve of the 10th anniversary of the American-led invasion of Iraq, an exhibit of photographs at the De Young Museum in San Francisco takes an intimate look at the impact of war on Iraqi citizens. From young boys rehearsing a play about martyrdom to men playing dominos at dusk, the images in "Eye Level in Iraq" offer a glimpse into everyday life as captured by photojournalists Kael Alford and Thorne Anderson. The museum's chief curator Julian Cox talks about the role of art and journalism and what he hopes viewers will take away from the exhibition.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Changing Seas [#301H] Alien Invaders In the waters of the western Atlantic and Caribbean, a voracious alien predator has taken hold. Native to the Indo-Pacific, the invasive lionfish is a major threat to biodiversity and the health of already stressed coral reef ecosystems. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 7:00 pm
    Intelligence Squared [#102H] Should Drugs Be Legalized? It was 1971 when President Richard Nixon declared a "war on drugs." $ 2.5 trillion dollars later, drug use is half of what it was 30 years ago and thousands of offenders are successfully diverted to treatment instead of jail. Still, 22 million Americans - nine percent of the population - still use illegal drugs; and with the highest incarceration rate in the world, we continue to fill our prisons with drug offenders, leaving shattered families and communities in the wake. Is it time to legalize drugs or is this a war that we're winning? duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 8:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#210H] Ending The Silence On Climate Change Encore Presentation:
    Remember climate change? The issue barely comes up with any substance in our current political dialogue. But bringing climate change back into our national conversation is as much a communications challenge as it is a scientific one. This week, scientist Anthony Leiserowitz, director of the Yale Project on Climate Change Communication, joins Bill to describe his efforts to galvanize communities over what's arguably the greatest single threat facing humanity. Leiserowitz, who specializes in the psychology of risk perception, knows better than anyone if people are willing to change their behavior to make a difference. "A pervasive sense up to now has been that climate change is distant - distant in time, and distant in space," Leiserowitz tells Bill. "And what we're now beginning to see is that it's not so distant. I have a 9-year-old son - he's going to be my age in the year 2050. I don't want him to live in the world that we're currently hurtling towards."
    duration 52:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 pm
    America Reframed [#121] Flying: Confessions of a Free Woman| Part 1 In this two part documentary, master storyteller Jennifer Fox lays bare her own turbulent life to penetrate what it means to be a free woman today. As her drama of work and relationships unfolds over four years, our protagonist travels to over seventeen countries to understand how diverse women define their lives when there is no map. Employing an ingenious new camera technique, called "passing the camera", Fox creates a documentary language that mirrors the special way women communicate. Over intimate conversations around kitchen tables from South Africa to Russia, India and Pakistan, she initiates a groundbreaking dialogue among women, illuminating universal concerns across race, class and nationality. duration 2:26:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 11:30 pm
    Global Voices [#520] Family Portrait In Black and White lga Nenya, from a small Ukrainian town, is raising 16 black orphans in a country of Slavic blue-eyed blondes. The reality of growing up as a bi-racial child in Eastern Europe - a rare and truly visible minority - is not for the faint of heart. These children always have to be on guard against the world that surrounds them. duration 53:38   STEREO
  • 12:30 am
    Hapa: One Step at a Time Race remains a powerful symbol in the US; it still is a shorthand notation for most Americans. This program speaks to how individuals of Asian and Pacific Islander descent are embracing their ethnic experiences as a symbol of change in an ever-evolving multicultural society. It is a thought-provoking exploration of what it means to be a mixed-race American today. The program is a first-person treatment of the struggles people of diverse cultural backgrounds and perspectives face. "Hapa" comes from the Hawaiian phrase hapa haole, which means half white/foreigner. Once considered a derogatory term, Hapa has come to be accepted as a way to describe a person of partial Asian ancestry. By Japanese American Midori Sperandeo, who provides a personal narrative about her evolution from a novice runner into a national class marathoner andshares the parallel path of her personal growth in searching for her racial identity. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
Sunday, March 17, 2013

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TV Technical Issues

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    TV Technical Issues
    • KQET (DT25) Over the Air: Wed 8/27

      We are aware of the break-up issues for our DT25 Over the Air signal in the Monterey/Salinas area. This will also affect viewers of any cable or satellite signal provider using that transmitter as their source. Engineers are working on the problem.

    • Week of 8/25: Sutro Tower work (including KQED 9 Over the Air)

      (Affects several San Francisco TV & Radio stations, including KQED 9.1, 9.2 & 9.3) During the week of August 25, Monday through Friday, between 9am and 4pm, several TV and radio stations will be switching to their Auxiliary antennas. This is being done so that the tower crew can perform routine maintenance on the regular […]

    • KQET Off Air Sun 8/03 morning

      (DT25.1, 25.2, 25.3) KQET DT25 was off the air for a portion of Sunday morning, due to the transmitter taking a power hit. The signal has been restored. Most receivers should have re-acquired our signal once it returned, but a few Over the Air viewers may need to do a rescan in order to restore […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

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Comcast 9 and 709
Digital 9.1, 54.2 or 25.1

All widescreen and HD programs

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Comcast 10 and 710
Digital 9.2, 54.1 or 25.2

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Comcast 189
Digital 54.3

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Comcast 190
Digital 9.3

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V-Me
Comcast 191 & 621
Digital 54.5 or 25.3

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Comcast 192
Digital 54.4

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