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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

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KQED World: Saturday, March 9, 2013

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, March 9, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10580] February Jobs Report * Osama Bin Laden's Son-in-Law Pleads Not Guilty * Hugo Chavez Funeral * Brooks and Marcus * A Look Back: 2011 Japanese Earthquake and Tsunami duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#32068] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, a strong employment report - we look at where the jobs are and where they aren't. We will talk with Alan Krueger, Chairman of the White House Council of Economic Advisers. Plus, does a positive jobs report mean interest rates are ready to rise? We will discuss with Bill Gross, founder, managing director and co-CIO of PIMCO, the world's largest bond fund. And, the last in our series this week, In Focus: The American Recovery, we take a look at the deep challenges still facing the U.S. economy. duration 24:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2854] Tavis talks with social psychologist Anthony Greenwald about ingrained attitudes and unintentional bias. The Blindspot author challenges the notion that most people are fair and willing to take others as they are. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    America Revealed [#102] Nation on the Move America is a nation of vast distances and dense urban clusters, woven together by 200,000 miles of railroads, 5000 airports and four million miles of roads. These massive, complex transportation systems combine to make Americans the most mobile people on earth, but much of this infrastructure, built in the 19th and 20th centuries, strains under the weight of our rapidly growing, constantly moving population. In this episode, host Yul Kwon journeys across the continent by air, road and rail. He ventures behind the scenes with the workers who get us where we need to go; he meets innovators creating ways to propel us farther and faster in years to come; and he uncovers the minor miracles and uphill battles involved in moving over 300 million Americans every day. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Inside Washington [#2447] duration 26:46   TVG
  • 3:30 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5236] duration 24:10   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2148] MEET THE NEW CONGRESSWOMEN #1
    Tammy Duckworth, (D-IL) - One of the first two female combat veterans in congress and the former Assistant Secretary of Veterans Affairs.
    Tulsi Gabbard, (D-HI) - One of the first two female combat veterans, first Hindu and first female of Samoan ancestry to serve Congress.
    Susan Brooks, (R- IN) - She has made efforts to battle mortgage fraud, gun violence, drug trafficking, gangs, child exploitation and identity theft. She currently serves on the Education and Workforce, Homeland Security and Ethics Committees.
    Cheri Bustos, (D-IL) - She has served on numerous nonprofit boards and as the President of the Women's Connection.
    Michelle Lujan Grisham, (D-NM) - She served as the state's first Secretary of Aging and Long Term Services and head of the New Mexico Department of Health. She will serve on the House Committees on Agriculture, the Budget and Oversight.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:30 am
    Asian Voices [#130] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    Need To Know [#310H] This week, NTK looks at two provocative approaches to tackling climate change. First, anchor Maria Hinojosa interviews environmental activist Bill McKibben about his nationwide movement that pressures universities to divest funds from energy corporations. Then the show updates its report on the tiny Pacific island nation of Palau and its pursuit of a remarkable legal strategy that endeavors to limit greenhouse gas emissions from the industrialized world. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:30 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3111] TOPICS: North Korea - Basketballs or Bombs?; Rand Paul's 13-Hour Filibuster; Obama's Overture. PANELISTS: Mort Zuckerman, US News & World Report; Eleanor Clift, Newsweek; Ryan Grim, The Huffington Post; Susan Ferrechio, The Washington Examiner. duration 27:30   TVRE
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    Moyers & Company [#209H] What We Can Learn from Lincoln Encore presentation: Pulitzer Prize winner Tony Kushner, who wrote the Oscar-nominated screenplay for Lincoln, joins Bill to talk about finding the man inside the monument, and what Abraham Lincoln - 147 years after his death - can still teach us all about politics, compromise, and the survival of American democracy. "The job of the president is both to make the compromises necessary to actually have things happen in a democracy, which means compromising at a slower pace than anybody would necessarily like," Kushner tells Bill. duration 52:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 am
    Focus On Europe [#3109] A Question of Faith In Spain The Greek government has introduced harsh austerity measures in response to the ongoing financial crisis. Among the moves to replenish the public coffers was a five-fold tax increase on heating oil. That backfired when sales of heating oil plunged drastically. The details:
    SPAIN: A QUESTION OF FAITH - One of the bulwarks of the Catholic Church in Europe, Spain has carried out numerous reforms in recent years - legalizing same-sex marriage, easing the divorce process, and liberalizing abortion access. When Pope Benedict XVI chastised Spain for these reforms during his visit to the country, many Catholics there found themselves drawn into a conflict between contemporary mores and the will of the Vatican. How have Spanish Catholics come to terms with this dilemma, and what are their expectations for the next pope?
    GREECE: FACING THE COLD WITH FIRE - Greece's forests are being decimated by illegal logging. It's a growing problem, exacerbated by a tax increase on heating oil that has caused sales to plunge by around 80%. Before the economic crisis, fireplaces in Greek living rooms were a status symbol. Today, though, fireplaces and ovens have become a necessity for many households. Just about anything that can be burned is used for fuel, including wood that's been logged illegally. In larger cities, the smoke has also caused a spike in air pollution during the winter.
    SLOVENIA: CRISIS OVER CORRUPTION - For many in Slovenia, it was the last straw. The government had long been faltering, and then an anti-corruption commission said that both the prime minister and the head of the opposition had failed to properly report their financial assets. For weeks, the country has been riven by mass demonstrations against corrupt and feckless politicians. The wave of protests began after Ljubljana mayor and opposition leader Zoran Jankovic was forced to step down late last December. Recent revelations about Prime Minister Janez Jansa have intensified the crisis. Several coalition parties have now quit the government.
    ESTONIA: A CAPITAL INTRODUCES FREE PUBLIC TRANSPORT - Tallinn in Estonia is the first European capital to offer its residents free public transport. The move was aimed at cutting down on car pollution and traffic in the city. Instead of driving, residents are being encouraged to turn to trams and busses. But some critics say it's a poor use of public funds and could lead to cuts in social services.
    duration 26:10   STEREO TVG
  • 7:30 am
    Global 3000 [#510] A Kenyan Dancer Overcomes Polio New Zealand - Controversial cow - It's a huge success for genetic engineering: cow's milk without beta-lactoglobulin (BLG), a whey protein that triggers allergies in many small children. The milk comes from Daisy, a black and white cow with a completely new genetic makeup. A German, Dr. Gotz Laible, played a significant role in her creation. Unlike many other countries, New Zealand gives massive state support to genetic research on large animals. The project has come in for strong criticism from the country's dairy farmers. The Daisy research project has so far cost the government the equivalent of 30 million euros in funding. Biomass instead of Coal - The Thai cement industry cuts CO2 emissions - Cement production is especially energy intensive and emits enormous amounts of CO2. That's why the Siam Cement Group, one of Thailand's largest producers, is no longer using only coal. It's now co-firing biomass - organic agricultural waste, for instance - in the manufacturing process. Trade in carbon certificates provides an additional financial incentive. Global Living Rooms: Lincoln, USA - This week we visit Laurie in her house in Lincoln, Nebraska. It's in the old town center, and its owner is very proud of that fact. Laurie enjoys playing the guitar to her soulmate, Jeff the cat. She says she's not very good, but she enjoys it anyway. Overcoming Gravity - Kenyan dancer Stephen Odongo - When Stephen Odongo was four years old, he contracted poliomyelitis. His mother believed it was caused by black magic and rejected him. His childhood was marked by humiliation and pain. As an adult, Stephen was discovered by a German choreographer who suffered from a form of muscular dystrophy herself and was looking for performers for an international arts project. Since then the troupe she formed has been performing all over Kenya .Their pieces are a plea for more humanity and tolerance. duration 26:00   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 am
    LinkAsia [#132] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2447] duration 26:46   TVG
  • 9:00 am
    Washington Week [#5236H] It was a week of mixed messages and political realities in Washington. There were allegations of gamesmanship vs. outreach across the political aisle; projections of significant fallout due to sequestration vs. the fact that the government is still rolling. Joining Gwen Ifill around the table this week: Greg Ip of The Economist, Susan Davis of USA Today, and Charles Babington of the Associated Press. Topics:
    * After a bruising battle over budget cuts, President Obama has now launched a Republican "charm offensive" hosting meals with key GOP lawmakers and making plans to get together with the entire Senate Republican caucus next week. The goal: breaking through the gridlock to find bipartisan solutions to the budget crisis. The president is focused on reaching a deal that includes tax reform and long-term deficit reduction. Lawmakers in the House passed a budget designed to avert fiscal disaster later this month. The big question: how can the White House and Congress finally find common ground and negotiate a comprehensive budget plan?
    * Meanwhile, after weeks of warnings and predictions of sequester doom, most Americans probably didn't notice. Investors on Wall Street didn't seem concerned, as the stock market surged to its highest levels ever. So now the question is: were the economists who cautioned that the $85 billion in spending cuts would stall the fragile economic recovery right or wrong?
    * Kentucky GOP Senator Rand Paul's nearly 13 hour filibuster to block John Brennan's confirmation as the new CIA chief proved to be unsuccessful. Brennan was confirmed by a 63-34 vote of the Senate on Thursday. However, Paul's principled stance forced Attorney General Eric Holder to admit that the president cannot order drone strikes against US citizens here at home. While the filibuster may have endeared him to libertarian supporters, some Republican Senators who support the use of drones weren't so happy. Now what happens?
    duration 24:10   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:30 am
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2420] March 8, 2013 Guest Host: Joshua Johnson.
    News panel:
    SANTA CRUZ POLICE OFFICERS - From across California, thousands mourned the murders of two Santa Cruz police officers killed during a routine investigation. The long and troubled criminal history of the killer raises questions about the criminal justice system.
    DOW JONES HIGH - The Dow Jones hit a twelve-year record high this week. Is it a temporary uptick or does it suggest a broader economic recovery? With new data out on job growth, how are Bay Area companies doing?
    DEVIL'S SLIDE - Commuters driving the coastal route between Santa Cruz and San Francisco can expect a different view next month. A dangerous stretch of Highway-1, known as Devil's Slide, will soon be re-routed away from the steep cliffs to new state-of-the-art mile-long tunnels.
    Guests: Martha Mendoza, Associated Press; Tom Vacar, KTVU; Paul Rogers, San Jose Mercury News and KQED.
    URBAN PLANNING: STUART COHEN - As we look to the future, Bay Area urban planners are scrambling for ideas on how to handle the projected increase in population. Over the last 40 years, California's sprawling growth and dependence on cars has taken its toll. According to a recent Census Bureau report, the region is home to the most "mega-commuters" in the country. These are people who spend at least 90 minutes and drive over 50 miles to get to work. Families, particularly those who can least afford it, are spending more and more of their time and income just getting where they need to go. Stuart Cohen, recipient of a 2013 James Irvine Foundation Leadership Award, believes that smarter regional planning can reverse these trends. As a founder and executive director of the nonprofit TransForm, he is leading an effort to revitalize local communities into diverse, vibrant places where more people walk, bike and take world-class public transit.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:00 am
    BBC Newsnight [#17067Z] duration 28:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2152H] Encore presentation:
    MEET THE NEW CONGRESSWOMEN #1
    Tammy Duckworth, (D-IL) - One of the first two female combat veterans in congress and the former Assistant Secretary of Veterans Affairs.
    Tulsi Gabbard, (D-HI) - One of the first two female combat veterans, first Hindu and first female of Samoan ancestry to serve Congress. < br />Susan Brooks, (R- IN) - She has made efforts to battle mortgage fraud, gun violence, drug trafficking, gangs, child exploitation and identity theft. She currently serves on the Education and Workforce, Homeland Security and Ethics Committees.
    Cheri Bustos, (D-IL) - She has served on numerous nonprofit boards and as the President of the Women's Connection.
    Michelle Lujan Grisham, (D-NM) - She served as the state's first Secretary of Aging and Long Term Services and head of the New Mexico Department of Health. She will serve on the House Committees on Agriculture, the Budget and Oversight.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3111] TOPICS: North Korea - Basketballs or Bombs?; Rand Paul's 13-Hour Filibuster; Obama's Overture. PANELISTS: Mort Zuckerman, US News & World Report; Eleanor Clift, Newsweek; Ryan Grim, The Huffington Post; Susan Ferrechio, The Washington Examiner. duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Need To Know [#310H] This week, NTK looks at two provocative approaches to tackling climate change. First, anchor Maria Hinojosa interviews environmental activist Bill McKibben about his nationwide movement that pressures universities to divest funds from energy corporations. Then the show updates its report on the tiny Pacific island nation of Palau and its pursuit of a remarkable legal strategy that endeavors to limit greenhouse gas emissions from the industrialized world. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#209H] What We Can Learn from Lincoln Encore presentation: Pulitzer Prize winner Tony Kushner, who wrote the Oscar-nominated screenplay for Lincoln, joins Bill to talk about finding the man inside the monument, and what Abraham Lincoln - 147 years after his death - can still teach us all about politics, compromise, and the survival of American democracy. "The job of the president is both to make the compromises necessary to actually have things happen in a democracy, which means compromising at a slower pace than anybody would necessarily like," Kushner tells Bill. duration 52:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:00 pm
    Changing Seas [#404H] Coastal Carnivores Scientists studying the coastal Everglades have made some perplexing discoveries. Bull sharks are living upstream where alligators should thrive, and gators are swimming out to the ocean to feed. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 1:30 pm
    BioCentury This Week [#211] duration 26:10   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    Great Decisions In Foreign Policy [#403] Feeding The Dragon: China In Africa African economies are booming like never before, thanks in large part to China. The global giant is investing in infrastructure projects to help it tap into the continent's resources - oil, minerals, and its huge agricultural potential. Critics charge China with cozying up to dictators and ignoring issues of human rights and transparency. Others fear that US is being left behind and its influence in Africa waning. China in Africa. Next on "Great Decisions." duration 29:00   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:30 pm
    Great Decisions In Foreign Policy [#404] Imperfect Union: The Eurozone In Crisis After World War Two, the leaders of Europe established greater economic ties to help prevent future continental conflict. Now, more than half a century later, the EU faces the biggest financial crisis in its history - and the future of the Eurozone itself is under question. What's preventing the world's second largest economy -- and America's largest trading partner -- from pulling itself out of recession? duration 29:00   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 pm
    Stanford Roundtable [#2012] Gray Matters: Your brain,your life and brain science in the 21stCentury What if you could use sadness to make you more creative, erase bad memories and wipe out stress, keep your brain fit into your 90s, and drastically reduce your risk of Alzheimer's and memory loss? The plasticity and capability of the brain has never been better understood. New research is revealing compelling findings that will change the way we think, interact and plan throughout our lives. As longevity and at the same time mental health issues are on the rise, our ability to impact the brain is also increasing. Yet these are the very early days, as some put it, of understanding "those three pounds of meat inside our heads". How can we apply the new brain science to our own lives, and how is neuroscience in the 21st century going to impact us all? Join ABC news correspondent Juju Chang and a panel of distinguished thought leaders and scientists to explore the brave new world of neuroscience and what it means for you and your family. The event, which took place in conjunction with Stanford's Reunion Homecoming Weekend, was taped Saturday, Oct. 6, 2012 in Maples Pavilion. duration 1:24:32   STEREO TVG
  • 4:30 pm
    No Going Back: Women and the War North of the Mason-Dixon line, the Industrial Revolution of the mid-19th century drew increasing numbers of women out of the home and into the factories. In the agrarian, antebellum South, no such exodus occurred. Many Southerners perceived the forces of modernization - including the early rumblings of the women's suffrage movement - as a threat to their traditional way of life. However, as Fort Sumter fell in April of 1861, so too would many firmly held cultural and societal beliefs about "a woman's place." Hardships and hunger forced ill-prepared, isolated and often un-educated Southern women into the public sphere to demand relief from the government and advocate for policy changes. NO GOING BACK: WOMEN AND THE WAR explores how the lives of women, and their roles in society, changed during and after the Civil War. Grammy?-winning singer-songwriter Mary Chapin Carpenter narrates. Interviews with well-known historians and academics, reenactments at Civil War-era landmarks, and dramatic readings from the letters and journals of women, both free and enslaved, illuminate this fascinating chapter in American history. duration 28:59   STEREO TVG
  • 5:00 pm
    History Detectives [#307] Doc Holliday's Watch/Civil War Female Soldiers/Japanese Internment Camp Artwork * Doc Holliday's Watch - Four years ago, a pawn store clerk in Tulsa, Oklahoma, met a customer with a pawned antique watch, engraved with a potentially historic inscription. Could this watch have been a gift from the fearless frontier lawman Wyatt Earp to the dentist, gambler and gunman "Doc" Holliday, perhaps in gratitude for his help fighting the Clanton outlaw gang at the OK Corral? HD uncovers the surprising facts behind this legendary gunfight and the real relationship between Wyatt Earp and Doc Holliday.
    * Civil War Female Soldiers - A Louisiana resident owns a Civil War photograph featuring a fine-boned, slight-figured soldier. The soldier is simply identified as a member of the 2nd Louisiana Infantry... but could it be a woman in disguise? HD learns more about the remarkable contributions of women during the Civil War and determines if this could indeed be the only known photo of a Confederate woman soldier.
    * Japanese Internment Camp Artwork - In a San Francisco historical archive, an intern recently discovered a set of 10 postcard-size watercolors of what appears to be a prison camp. Piecing them together, the intern was surprised to find they were painted on the back of a Japanese-American internment notice from 1942. What is the story behind these paintings? Who was the artist? And what was his or her fate? HD travels to the West Coast to solve the puzzle, uncovering the dramatic story of one of the 120,000 Americans citizens who spent years behind barbed wire, guilty only of being of Japanese descent.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3111] TOPICS: North Korea - Basketballs or Bombs?; Rand Paul's 13-Hour Filibuster; Obama's Overture. PANELISTS: Mort Zuckerman, US News & World Report; Eleanor Clift, Newsweek; Ryan Grim, The Huffington Post; Susan Ferrechio, The Washington Examiner. duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Washington Week [#5236H] It was a week of mixed messages and political realities in Washington. There were allegations of gamesmanship vs. outreach across the political aisle; projections of significant fallout due to sequestration vs. the fact that the government is still rolling. Joining Gwen Ifill around the table this week: Greg Ip of The Economist, Susan Davis of USA Today, and Charles Babington of the Associated Press. Topics:
    * After a bruising battle over budget cuts, President Obama has now launched a Republican "charm offensive" hosting meals with key GOP lawmakers and making plans to get together with the entire Senate Republican caucus next week. The goal: breaking through the gridlock to find bipartisan solutions to the budget crisis. The president is focused on reaching a deal that includes tax reform and long-term deficit reduction. Lawmakers in the House passed a budget designed to avert fiscal disaster later this month. The big question: how can the White House and Congress finally find common ground and negotiate a comprehensive budget plan?
    * Meanwhile, after weeks of warnings and predictions of sequester doom, most Americans probably didn't notice. Investors on Wall Street didn't seem concerned, as the stock market surged to its highest levels ever. So now the question is: were the economists who cautioned that the $85 billion in spending cuts would stall the fragile economic recovery right or wrong?
    * Kentucky GOP Senator Rand Paul's nearly 13 hour filibuster to block John Brennan's confirmation as the new CIA chief proved to be unsuccessful. Brennan was confirmed by a 63-34 vote of the Senate on Thursday. However, Paul's principled stance forced Attorney General Eric Holder to admit that the president cannot order drone strikes against US citizens here at home. While the filibuster may have endeared him to libertarian supporters, some Republican Senators who support the use of drones weren't so happy. Now what happens?
    duration 24:10   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 pm
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2420] March 8, 2013 Guest Host: Joshua Johnson.
    News panel:
    SANTA CRUZ POLICE OFFICERS - From across California, thousands mourned the murders of two Santa Cruz police officers killed during a routine investigation. The long and troubled criminal history of the killer raises questions about the criminal justice system.
    DOW JONES HIGH - The Dow Jones hit a twelve-year record high this week. Is it a temporary uptick or does it suggest a broader economic recovery? With new data out on job growth, how are Bay Area companies doing?
    DEVIL'S SLIDE - Commuters driving the coastal route between Santa Cruz and San Francisco can expect a different view next month. A dangerous stretch of Highway-1, known as Devil's Slide, will soon be re-routed away from the steep cliffs to new state-of-the-art mile-long tunnels.
    Guests: Martha Mendoza, Associated Press; Tom Vacar, KTVU; Paul Rogers, San Jose Mercury News and KQED.
    URBAN PLANNING: STUART COHEN - As we look to the future, Bay Area urban planners are scrambling for ideas on how to handle the projected increase in population. Over the last 40 years, California's sprawling growth and dependence on cars has taken its toll. According to a recent Census Bureau report, the region is home to the most "mega-commuters" in the country. These are people who spend at least 90 minutes and drive over 50 miles to get to work. Families, particularly those who can least afford it, are spending more and more of their time and income just getting where they need to go. Stuart Cohen, recipient of a 2013 James Irvine Foundation Leadership Award, believes that smarter regional planning can reverse these trends. As a founder and executive director of the nonprofit TransForm, he is leading an effort to revitalize local communities into diverse, vibrant places where more people walk, bike and take world-class public transit.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:30 pm
    Changing Seas [#404H] Coastal Carnivores Scientists studying the coastal Everglades have made some perplexing discoveries. Bull sharks are living upstream where alligators should thrive, and gators are swimming out to the ocean to feed. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1125] Paraguay and Uruguay Holly Morris discovers two South American countries that may share a similar name but couldn't be more different. Beginning her journey in Uruguay, Holly explores its beautiful coastline, often referred to as the Riviera of the Southern Hemisphere. Later, Holly boards a plane and heads northwest to the mysterious land locked nation of Paraguay. In contrast to Uruguay, Paraguay is one of the least visited countries on the South American continent duration 57:29   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 9:00 pm
    Apache 8 The heroic story of an all-women wildland firefighter crew from the White Mountain Apache Tribe, who have been fighting fires in Arizona and throughout the US, for over 25 years. The film delves into the challenging lives of these Native fire fighters. Four extraordinary women from different generations of the Apache 8 crew, share their personal narratives with humor and tenderness. duration 56:40   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 10:00 pm
    Annie Oakley: American Experience In 1926, just a few months before Annie Oakley's death, Will Rogers described her as "the greatest woman rifle shot the world has ever produced." As the star attraction of Buffalo Bill's Wild West Show, she thrilled audiences around the world with her daring shooting feats. Her act helped fuel turn-of-the-century nostalgia for the vanished, mythical world of the American West. Over time she became an American legend -- the loud, brassy, cocksure shooter celebrated in the musical "Annie Get Your Gun." But that legend had little to do with the real Annie Oakley. Although famous as a Western sharpshooter, Oakley lived her entire life east of the Mississippi. A champion in a man's sport, she forever changed ideas about the abilities of women, yet she opposed female suffrage. Her fame and fortune came from her skill with guns, yet she was a Quaker. This film is the story of a five-foot-tall sharpshooter who pulled herself out of the depths of poverty to become known the world over as a symbol of the Wild West. It chronicles Oakley's life, from her childhood in Ohio to her world tours with Buffalo Bill's Wild West show. duration 54:10   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 11:00 pm
    A Girl's Life This program explores what it means to be a girl in America today. On the surface, it seems clear. The new American girl is becoming more and more powerful -- and she knows it. She competes on the athletic field and she regularly outperforms the boys to her left and right in the classroom. But this picture of empowerment is deceiving. As a society we are starting to realize that in middle and high school, girls' self-confidence takes a nose-dive. Far too often, the once strong, self-assured prepubescent girl becomes docile and fearful. These girls begin, in the now-famous words of psychologist Carol Gilligan, "to lose their voices." And with this loss of self comes a drop in academic performance as well. This program brings together the latest scientific research on the psychological, physical, emotional and spiritual development of girls, to help parents, educators and all concerned better understand them. The program is based in part on author Rachel Simmons' book "Odd Girl Out." duration 56:46   STEREO TV14
  • 12:00 am
    In Search of Myths and Heroes [#103] Shangri-La/Jason & The Golden Fleece The third of Michael Wood's historical journeys takes viewers on a thrilling trek through India, Nepal and Tibet in search of Shangri-La. The tale of the magical valley hidden behind the Himalayas was popularized in the 1930s movie Lost Horizon, but the myth of a secret earthly paradise is much older. To find the truth behind the legend, Wood travels on foot through some of the world's most sacred mountains before finally reaching the fantastic ruins of a lost city, which he believes is the real inspiration behind the myth. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
Saturday, March 9, 2013

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TV Technical Issues

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    TV Technical Issues
    • KQET (DT25) Over the Air: Wed 8/27

      We are aware of the break-up issues for our DT25 Over the Air signal in the Monterey/Salinas area. This will also affect viewers of any cable or satellite signal provider using that transmitter as their source. Engineers are working on the problem.

    • Week of 8/25: Sutro Tower work (including KQED 9 Over the Air)

      (Affects several San Francisco TV & Radio stations, including KQED 9.1, 9.2 & 9.3) During the week of August 25, Monday through Friday, between 9am and 4pm, several TV and radio stations will be switching to their Auxiliary antennas. This is being done so that the tower crew can perform routine maintenance on the regular […]

    • KQET Off Air Sun 8/03 morning

      (DT25.1, 25.2, 25.3) KQET DT25 was off the air for a portion of Sunday morning, due to the transmitter taking a power hit. The signal has been restored. Most receivers should have re-acquired our signal once it returned, but a few Over the Air viewers may need to do a rescan in order to restore […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

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Quality children's programming parents love too