Donate

TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Saturday, February 23, 2013

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, February 23, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10570H] * After Newtown: Public Health - From Chicago, a look at gun violence as a public health issue. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan recently shared that many more children die of gunshot wounds every day in Chicago than are killed by mass murderers in a year.
    Also: * Sequestration * US, China and Japan * Shields and Brooks * Pistorius and Domestic Violence
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#32058Z] From less money in your paycheck to paying more at the gas pump, consumers are feeling the pinch. NBR's Erika Miller takes a look at how company's that are dependent on spending are starting to feel the heat. Then there's coming government spending cuts. NBR's Darren Gersh has more on whether the economy has enough kick in it to withstand the sequester. And, a big win for activist investor David Einhorn in his fight to get Apple to share the wealth with its shareholders. NBR's Tom Hudson speaks with Topeka Captial Markets' Brian White. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2844] Tavis talks with two Grammy-winning musicians, Ben Harper and Charlie Musselwhite. The singer-songwriter-guitarist and famed blues harmonica player explain how they united for the new CD, "Get Up!" duration 26:46   STEREO
  • 2:00 am
    Black Kungfu Experience, The This program introduces kungfu's African-American pioneers, men who challenged convention and overturned preconceived notions while mastering the ancient art. The four martial artists profiled include Ron Van Clief, an ex-Marine and Vietnam veteran who starred in more than 40 kungfu films and earned the nickname "Black Dragon" from Bruce Lee. Their compelling stories illustrate how kungfu began as - and remains - a unique crucible of the black experience. In particular, kungfu's themes of the underdog triumphing against the odds resonated in black communities across the United States. duration 56:44   STEREO TVPG
  • 3:00 am
    Inside Washington [#2445] 1. The sequester blame game and the Armageddon scenario.
    2. The cyber wars. Is China hacking us blind?
    3. A new look at the Supreme Court and the death penalty.
    4. In the US Senate, Ted Cruz, the brash new Tea Party kid on the block.
    duration 26:46   TVG
  • 3:30 am
    Washington Week [#5234H] * The latest showdown over deficit reduction has the White House and Congress trading blame for the lack of a deal rather than working together to reach a compromise. If a budget deal is not reached, 85 billion dollars in automatic spending cuts are set to kick in March 1. What are the chances for a deal before the deadline? We'll get answers and analysis on the politics of sequestration from John Harwood of CNBC and The New York Times.
    * An American cyber security company revealed this week that China has orchestrated worldwide computer hacking attacks on US businesses, news organizations and government agencies. The Chinese government denies the allegations, but there is growing concern the next phase of these high-tech attacks could involve "cyber espionage" of US power systems, air traffic, and other infrastructure. David Sanger of The New York Times reports on what the US is doing to protect the US economy and national security from these cyber intrusions.
    * "Washington Week" is part of PBS' "After Newtown" initiative, a series of documentaries, news reports and public affairs programs providing thought-provoking context to the national conversation about gun violence in America. PBS has brought together its science, documentary and public affairs programs to provide in-depth reporting on the myriad issues related to gun violence, including gun laws, mental health support and availability, and school safety. This week Molly Ball of The Atlantic and Sari Horwitz of The Washington Post will report on the renewed push for tougher gun laws at the state and federal level in the wake of the Newtown school shooting and the deepening divide over gun rights.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2150H] * VAWA: The fight over VAWA is about to heat up again. As the debate continues, it is unclear whether the House will address the politically sensitive issues that blocked reauthorization last year.
    * The Feminine Mystique: As the feminist manifesto celebrates 50 years this week, some wonder - is it still relevant to women in today's world?
    * Kat Calvin: The co-founder of Blerdology, formally black girls hack', is interested in getting more black women and girls involved in technology.
    Panelists: National Council of Negro Women Executive Director Dr. Avis Jones-DeWeever; Conservative Commentator Tara Setmayer; Democratic Commentator Monica Cevallos; Conservative Commentator Darlene Kennedy.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    Asian Voices [#129] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    Need To Know [#308H] In the wake of the Newtown tragedy, NTK retraces an earlier shooting incident, exploring the ripple effects that continue to reverberate years later. The program takes an in-depth look at the traumatic results on the victim's family, the killer and the killer's family, others wounded that day and on the community at large. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:30 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3109] TOPICS: Sequester Showdown; War Crimes in Syria? PANELISTS: Pat Buchanan, Author and Columnist; Eleanor Clift, Newsweek; Paul Glastris, The Washington Monthly; Susan Ferrechio, The Washington Examiner. duration 27:30   TVRE
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    Shakespeare Uncovered [#105H] Hamlet with David Tennant An acclaimed Hamlet himself in the RSC's recent hit production (and another recent Great Performances production), David Tennant meets with fellow Hamlets, including superstar Jude Law, comparing notes on the titanic challenge of playing the most iconic of all roles. He also tries, alongside Simon Russell Beale and Ben Whishaw, to master the meaning of the play and the reason why it is considered the greatest of Shakespeare's works. duration 55:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 7:00 am
    Focus On Europe [#3107] Russian Orphanages On Trial ORPHANAGES ON TRIAL: Hundreds of thousands of children in Russia are growing up as orphans. Many of them are what are called "social orphans" - meaning they have at least one living parent, but have been relinquished by the latter to the state. Despite these figures, President Vladimir Putin has sharpened the laws governing adoption. In the past, many Russian orphans were adopted by couples from the US and Western Europe. Now American families are banned from Russian adoptions entirely. President Putin has said that the country can care for its own children. In reality, however, Russian orphanages have a reputation for abysmal conditions. Apart from a few showcase orphanages, the majority of children's homes are closed to public scrutiny.
    REIMAGINING THE BANLIEUE: Desolate housing developments, torched cars and angry youth - these are the images that dominate media coverage of urban suburbs in France. Now architects have taken their hand to a Parisian banlieue in a regeneration program that aims to revitalize the troubled district. Champigny-sur-Marne, south of Paris, is known as a socially disadvantaged area. Many of its residents are immigrants, and many are unemployed. The town is blanketed with tracts of unattractive pre-fab housing. Now a multi-million euro project is building new single-family houses - and in an especially unusual move, they're being built directly on top of the prefabricated units. The goal is to create dwellings that will breathe fresh life into the community.
    A LIFE SPENT IN HIDING: Nearly a century after the mass killings of Armenians in the Ottoman Empire, an increasing number of Turks of Armenian heritage are acknowledging their roots. Out of fear of discrimination, many survivors had converted to Islam and adopted Turkish names. While a number of countries say the massacres constituted genocide, Turkey still rejects the term. The government has taken steps towards rapprochement with Christian communities, however, such as returning many properties confiscated over past decades - among them properties owned by Armenians. Moves such as these have encouraged people to acknowledge their Armenian heritage - including in eastern Anatolia, the region which was once home to a large Armenian population.
    PRISON ISLAND OF GORGONA: Series: "Small Worlds" Part 5 - Most former prison islands today are museums. One exception is the penal colony on Gorgona. Gorgona Prison has been in existence since 1869. Those behind bars today include men convicted of robbery and manslaughter - who are now being trained for work in the farming sector, animal husbandry and winemaking. Anyone trying to approach the island unannounced will be turned back by the police. On visiting day convicts are allowed to meet friends and family at the island's sole bar, which then doubles as a pizzeria.
    duration 26:10   STEREO TVG
  • 7:30 am
    Global 3000 [#508] Vegetables from the Slums Many families in Nairobi's slums can't afford fresh vegetables and there is too little space to create regular gardens. Sack gardens are a simple, effective solution. People can grow vegetables in cloth sacks filled with stones and soil. In Kenya's climate, the plants thrive - and a sack garden takes up minimal space. The details:
    CURSE OR BLESSING: VANUATU'S VOLCANOES ARE A TOURIST ATTRACTION - Much of the archipelago of Vanuatu is without electricity and running water. People here live from what their own gardens produce. But tourism is becoming an economic factor in the island republic. The main attraction is the boiling lava of the Yasur volcano.
    VEGETABLES FROM THE SLUMS: THE SACK GARDENS OF NAIROBI - Vegetables are sold in the slums, but not many people living there can afford them. So now they grow their own. The climate is favorable in Kenya, so plants grow fast if they are sufficiently watered and cared for. But there's not enough space to plant fields. The solution is sack gardens.
    YOUNG GLOBAL LEADERS: GINA BADENOCH - Gina Badenoch comes from Mexico. The child of a Mexican mother and British father, she's a professional photographer. As a social entrepreneur, she has launched a foundation called "Ojos que Sienten", or "Sight of Emotions". Gina Badenoch works with blind people. Her goal is to strengthen their self-confidence and give them the tools to get a job and be self-supporting.
    INDIA'S ENDANGERED PARADISE: CLIMATE PROTECTION THROUGH ENVIRONMENTAL TEACHING - The Indian state of Goa's economy depends on its beaches, which attract millions of tourists every year. Vacationers want clean beaches and cities, but Goa is burdened with mountains of garbage. If the garbage is allowed to simply rot, climate-damaging gases like methane develop. The biggest problem is that the people here have little environmental consciousness. So the state is now targeting young people. At more than 1000 schools, they are learning about climate change and how to protect their environment.
    duration 26:00   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 am
    LinkAsia [#130] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2445] 1. The sequester blame game and the Armageddon scenario.
    2. The cyber wars. Is China hacking us blind?
    3. A new look at the Supreme Court and the death penalty.
    4. In the US Senate, Ted Cruz, the brash new Tea Party kid on the block.
    duration 26:46   TVG
  • 9:00 am
    Washington Week [#5234H] * The latest showdown over deficit reduction has the White House and Congress trading blame for the lack of a deal rather than working together to reach a compromise. If a budget deal is not reached, 85 billion dollars in automatic spending cuts are set to kick in March 1. What are the chances for a deal before the deadline? We'll get answers and analysis on the politics of sequestration from John Harwood of CNBC and The New York Times.
    * An American cyber security company revealed this week that China has orchestrated worldwide computer hacking attacks on US businesses, news organizations and government agencies. The Chinese government denies the allegations, but there is growing concern the next phase of these high-tech attacks could involve "cyber espionage" of US power systems, air traffic, and other infrastructure. David Sanger of The New York Times reports on what the US is doing to protect the US economy and national security from these cyber intrusions.
    * "Washington Week" is part of PBS' "After Newtown" initiative, a series of documentaries, news reports and public affairs programs providing thought-provoking context to the national conversation about gun violence in America. PBS has brought together its science, documentary and public affairs programs to provide in-depth reporting on the myriad issues related to gun violence, including gun laws, mental health support and availability, and school safety. This week Molly Ball of The Atlantic and Sari Horwitz of The Washington Post will report on the renewed push for tougher gun laws at the state and federal level in the wake of the Newtown school shooting and the deepening divide over gun rights.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:30 am
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2418H] February 22, 2013 Guest Host: Jami Floyd.
    BAY AREA GUN VIOLENCE - An epidemic of mass shootings, including the brutal killings of 20 children and six adults from Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut, has shaken the nation. But some urban communities live with the relentless reality of gun violence every day. Here in Northern California, in places like Oakland, San Jose, Richmond, Vallejo and Fresno, a recent violent crime surge has made residents anxious. We devote our full program this week to the topic of gun violence in our communities.
    Guests: Mina Kim, KQED California Report; Eva Paterson, President & Founder of Equal Justice Society; Allison Briscoe-Smith, Director, Center for the Vulnerable Child, Children's Hospital Oakland.
    SOLDIERS AGAINST VIOLENCE EVERYWHERE - In the past 5 years, there were more than 550 homicides in Oakland, most by gun fire. According to data compiled by the Urban Strategies Council, 143 Oakland residents age 17 and under were shot in 2011 - 6 of them fatally. A group residents is pleading to be heard by the police, policymakers, and their own community. They call themselves "SAVE," an acronym for "Soldiers Against Violence Everywhere."
    NEWSMAKER INTERVIEW: WILLIAM BRATTON - An interview with Oakland's controversial new police consultant as he prepares to tackle violence on the streets of one of the country's hardest hit communities.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:00 am
    BBC Newsnight [#17053Z] duration 28:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2150H] * VAWA: The fight over VAWA is about to heat up again. As the debate continues, it is unclear whether the House will address the politically sensitive issues that blocked reauthorization last year.
    * The Feminine Mystique: As the feminist manifesto celebrates 50 years this week, some wonder - is it still relevant to women in today's world?
    * Kat Calvin: The co-founder of Blerdology, formally black girls hack', is interested in getting more black women and girls involved in technology.
    Panelists: National Council of Negro Women Executive Director Dr. Avis Jones-DeWeever; Conservative Commentator Tara Setmayer; Democratic Commentator Monica Cevallos; Conservative Commentator Darlene Kennedy.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3109] TOPICS: Sequester Showdown; War Crimes in Syria? PANELISTS: Pat Buchanan, Author and Columnist; Eleanor Clift, Newsweek; Paul Glastris, The Washington Monthly; Susan Ferrechio, The Washington Examiner. duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Need To Know [#308H] In the wake of the Newtown tragedy, NTK retraces an earlier shooting incident, exploring the ripple effects that continue to reverberate years later. The program takes an in-depth look at the traumatic results on the victim's family, the killer and the killer's family, others wounded that day and on the community at large. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#207H] Taming Capitalism Run Wild * Even as President Obama's talking points champion the middle class and condemn how our economy caters to the very rich, the truth behind modern American capitalism is a story of continued inequality and hardship. Even a modest increase in the minimum wage - as suggested by the president - faces opposition from those who apparently pledge allegiance first and foremost to America's wealthy and powerful.
    Yet some aren't just wringing their hands about our economic crisis; they're fighting back. This week, economist Richard Wolff joins Bill to shine light on the disaster left behind in capitalism's wake, and discusses how to battle for economic justice. A noted professor emeritus at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, and now visiting professor at Manhattan's New School, Wolff has written many books on the effects of rampant capitalism, including Capitalism Hits the Fan.
    * Also on the broadcast, activist and author Saru Jayaraman marches on Washington with restaurant workers struggling to make ends meet, and talks about how we can best support their right to a fair wage. Jayaraman is the co-founder and co-director of the Restaurant Opportunities Centers United, which works to improve pay and working conditions for America's 10 million-plus restaurant workers. She is also the author of Behind the Kitchen Door, a new expose of the restaurant industry.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:00 pm
    QUEST [#301H] Chasing Beetles, Finding Darwin It's been 150 years since Charles Darwin published On the Origin of Species. Yet his ideas remain as central to scientific exploration as ever. QUEST follows researchers who are still unlocking the mysteries of evolution, like entomologist David Kavanaugh, who predicted that a new beetle species would be found on the Trinity Alps. Find out if his prediction came true. duration 26:04   STEREO TVG
  • 1:30 pm
    BioCentury This Week [#209] duration 25:40   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    Secrets of the Dead [#1004] Slave Ship Mutiny When the Meermin set sail from Madagascar en route to South Africa on a hot summer's day in 1766, the Dutch crew had no idea they were about to make history. The ship was filled to capacity with human cargo, slaves bound for hard labor building the Dutch colony, Cape Town. But the Meermin with its crew and cargo would never make it to Cape Town. Instead, in a dramatic altercation, the slaves mutinied and managed to overpower the Dutch crew, ordering the ship be sailed back to Madagascar and freedom. But through a sinister act of deception the crew turned the boat around each evening and made full sail for Cape Town. And so the circumstances for a dramatic climax -- and shipwreck -- were laid when the ship and its desperate passengers finally spied land. This program tracks the efforts of archaeologists, historians and slave descendents to discover the full story of this dramatic historical event. They want to learn what happened on the Meermin, how the slaves were able to overpower their captors, and why the ship ended up wrecked on a wild, windswept beach 200 miles east of Cape Town. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG-V (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 pm
    Slavery By Another Name This documentary challenges one of America's most cherished assumptions: the belief that slavery in this country ended with Abraham Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation of 1863. It tells a harrowing story of how in the South, even as chattel slavery came to an end, new forms of involuntary servitude, including convict leasing, debt slavery and peonage, took its place with shocking force - brutalizing and ultimately circumscribing the lives of hundreds of thousands of African Americans well into the 20th century. It was a system in which men, often guilty of no crime at all, were arrested, compelled to work without pay, repeatedly bought and sold and coerced to do the bidding of masters.
    The program spans eight decades, from 1865 to 1945, revealing the interlocking forces in both the South and the North that enabled this "neoslavery" to begin and persist. Using archival photographs and dramatic re-enactments, filmed on location in Alabama and Georgia, it tells the forgotten stories of both victims and perpetrators of neoslavery and includes interviews with their descendants living today. The program also features interviews with Douglas Blackmon, author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning book "Slavery by Another Name" and with leading scholars of this period.
    duration 1:26:46   STEREO TVPG-VL (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:30 pm
    America Reframed [#118] Brother Outsider: The Life of Bayard Rustin During his 60-year career as an activist, organizer and "troublemaker, " Bayard Rustin formulated many of the strategies that propelled the American civil rights movement. His passionate belief in Gandhi' s philosophy of nonviolence drew Martin Luther King Jr. and other leaders to him in the 1940's and 50's; his practice of those beliefs drew the attention of the FBI and police. But his open homosexuality forced him to remain in the background, marking him again and again as a "brother outsider." Brother Outsider combines rare archival footage - some of it never before broadcast in the U.S. - with provocative interviews to illuminate the life and work of a forgotten prophet of social change. duration 1:50:44   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3109] TOPICS: Sequester Showdown; War Crimes in Syria? PANELISTS: Pat Buchanan, Author and Columnist; Eleanor Clift, Newsweek; Paul Glastris, The Washington Monthly; Susan Ferrechio, The Washington Examiner. duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Washington Week [#5234H] * The latest showdown over deficit reduction has the White House and Congress trading blame for the lack of a deal rather than working together to reach a compromise. If a budget deal is not reached, 85 billion dollars in automatic spending cuts are set to kick in March 1. What are the chances for a deal before the deadline? We'll get answers and analysis on the politics of sequestration from John Harwood of CNBC and The New York Times.
    * An American cyber security company revealed this week that China has orchestrated worldwide computer hacking attacks on US businesses, news organizations and government agencies. The Chinese government denies the allegations, but there is growing concern the next phase of these high-tech attacks could involve "cyber espionage" of US power systems, air traffic, and other infrastructure. David Sanger of The New York Times reports on what the US is doing to protect the US economy and national security from these cyber intrusions.
    * "Washington Week" is part of PBS' "After Newtown" initiative, a series of documentaries, news reports and public affairs programs providing thought-provoking context to the national conversation about gun violence in America. PBS has brought together its science, documentary and public affairs programs to provide in-depth reporting on the myriad issues related to gun violence, including gun laws, mental health support and availability, and school safety. This week Molly Ball of The Atlantic and Sari Horwitz of The Washington Post will report on the renewed push for tougher gun laws at the state and federal level in the wake of the Newtown school shooting and the deepening divide over gun rights.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 pm
    THIS WEEK in Northern California [#2418H] February 22, 2013 Guest Host: Jami Floyd.
    BAY AREA GUN VIOLENCE - An epidemic of mass shootings, including the brutal killings of 20 children and six adults from Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut, has shaken the nation. But some urban communities live with the relentless reality of gun violence every day. Here in Northern California, in places like Oakland, San Jose, Richmond, Vallejo and Fresno, a recent violent crime surge has made residents anxious. We devote our full program this week to the topic of gun violence in our communities.
    Guests: Mina Kim, KQED California Report; Eva Paterson, President & Founder of Equal Justice Society; Allison Briscoe-Smith, Director, Center for the Vulnerable Child, Children's Hospital Oakland.
    SOLDIERS AGAINST VIOLENCE EVERYWHERE - In the past 5 years, there were more than 550 homicides in Oakland, most by gun fire. According to data compiled by the Urban Strategies Council, 143 Oakland residents age 17 and under were shot in 2011 - 6 of them fatally. A group residents is pleading to be heard by the police, policymakers, and their own community. They call themselves "SAVE," an acronym for "Soldiers Against Violence Everywhere."
    NEWSMAKER INTERVIEW: WILLIAM BRATTON - An interview with Oakland's controversial new police consultant as he prepares to tackle violence on the streets of one of the country's hardest hit communities.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:30 pm
    QUEST [#301H] Chasing Beetles, Finding Darwin It's been 150 years since Charles Darwin published On the Origin of Species. Yet his ideas remain as central to scientific exploration as ever. QUEST follows researchers who are still unlocking the mysteries of evolution, like entomologist David Kavanaugh, who predicted that a new beetle species would be found on the Trinity Alps. Find out if his prediction came true. duration 26:04   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1123] Madrid City Guide Adela visits exciting Madrid, taking in the artwork at the Prado, "El Rastro," the city's famous flea market, Spanish Civil War landmarks and samples the fabulous cuisine. She also takes excursions to nearby El Escorial, the Roman aqueducts of Segovia and the charming hillside town of Toledo. duration 56:22   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 9:00 pm
    Nature [#2802H] A Murder of Crows Crows do not have the best of reputations. They are generally dismissed as spooky - Hitchcock used them quite successfully to frighten moviegoers, or as a general nuisance - scarecrows were, after all, invented to scare crows away from crops. But their image is about to take a real turn. New research has shown they are among the most intelligent animals in the world, able to use tools as only elephants and chimpanzees do, able to recognize each other's voices and 250 distinct calls. They are very social, mate for life and raise their young for up to five years. And they are able to recognize individual humans and pick them out of a crowd up to two years later. Crow experts from around the world sing their praises and present us with captivating new footage of crows as we have never seen them before. duration 55:46   SRND51 TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 10:00 pm
    Nova [#4008H] Mind of a Rampage Killer What makes a person walk into a theater or a church or a classroom full of students and open fire? What combination of circumstances compels a human being to commit the most inhuman of crimes? Can science in any way help us understand these horrific events and provide clues as to how to prevent them in the future?
    As the nation tries to understand the tragic events at Newtown, Miles O'Brien separates fact from fiction, investigating new theories that the most destructive rampage killers are driven most of all, not by the urge to kill, but the wish to die. Could suicide and the desire to go out in a media-fueled blaze of glory be the main motivation? How much can science tell us about a brain at risk for violence? Most importantly, can we recognize dangerous minds in time - and stop the next Newtown?
    duration 54:16   STEREO TVPG-V
  • 11:00 pm
    The Path to Violence Ever since the wake-up call that was Columbine, schools and law enforcement have developed multiple strategies to prevent attacks. Indeed, the horror of Newtown needs to be seen in a context that's not defined by defeat. Remarkably, more than 120 school assaults have been thwarted in the past ten years. But, while security hardware and physical barriers can play a deterrent role, it's been psychologists working hand in hand with law enforcement officers who have come up with the most helpful tools to prevent violent attacks. This documentary tells the story of a powerfully effective Secret Service program - the Safe School Initiative - that's helped schools detect problem behavior in advance.
    Yet, despite the progress made, recent attacks reveal a gaping hole in our safety net. Shooters like Adam Lanza, Jared Loughner and James Holmes all executed their attacks after they'd left their respective schools. In such cases, parents may be the first and only line of defense parents who are terrified of their own children and who receive inadequate help from the mental health and legal systems.
    Can the hard-won gains made by social psychologists and law enforcement be extended to encompass the parents and families of some of the nation's most violent individuals? Further, is the country ready to have a national conversation about the balance between school safety and civil liberties that any such interventions - including gun control - require?
    duration 52:36   STEREO TV14
  • 12:00 am
    Shakespeare Uncovered [#105H] Hamlet with David Tennant An acclaimed Hamlet himself in the RSC's recent hit production (and another recent Great Performances production), David Tennant meets with fellow Hamlets, including superstar Jude Law, comparing notes on the titanic challenge of playing the most iconic of all roles. He also tries, alongside Simon Russell Beale and Ben Whishaw, to master the meaning of the play and the reason why it is considered the greatest of Shakespeare's works. duration 55:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
Saturday, February 23, 2013

Navigate By Date

Calendar is loading...
Become a KQED sponsor

TV Technical Issues

TV
    TV Technical Issues
    • KQED all channels, planned overnight maintenance: early Fri 12/19 midnight-6am

      (this includes all DT9, DT54 and DT25 channels, along with all paid services) We will be doing upgrade and maintenance work in our Master Control area during the overnight hours of late Thurs/early Fri 12/19. Work will begin shortly after midnight early Friday, which may last until 6am, though we hope to finish earlier. This […]

    • KQED Plus OTA ? Optimistically planned maintenance: Fri 12/05 mid-morning

      (DT54.1 thru 54.5) Assuming that the weather and road conditions permit, we plan to do a bit of maintenance on our KQEH transmitter the morning of Friday 12/05… hopefully 10am-11am-ish, but could be a bit later. Most of the work should not affect the outgoing signal, but there will need to be a cable swap […]

    • Mon 11/03/14: Work on KQED Plus tower (DT54)

      Another station needs to do maintenance on its equipment on the tower on Monument Peak, requiring that we switch our DT54 Over the Air signal from the main antenna to the auxiliary when the work starts, then back to the main antenna at the conclusion. These switches should cause momentary outages only, and most receivers […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Channels 9.1, 54.2 & 25.1 - Monterey (KQET)
XFINITY 9 and HD 709

All widescreen and HD programs

KQED Plus

KQED +
Channels 54, 54.1, 9.2 & 25.2 - Monterey
XFINITY 10 and HD 2710

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life
Channel 54.3
XFINITY 189

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Channel 9.3
XFINITY 190

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Channel 54.5 & 25.3
XFINITY 191 & 621

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Channel 54.4
XFINITY 192

Quality children's programming parents love too