Donate

TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Saturday, September 29, 2012

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, September 29, 2012
  • 12:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#31325Z] Regulators want to make mutual fund money markets safer. NBR's Washington Bureau Chief Darren Gersh has more on what the government is trying to do. The third quarter comes to a close and the fourth could be even better for investors. NBR's Suzanne Pratt takes a look. Stillwater Mining's CEO speaks with NBR's Tom Hudson about global demand and why platinum is cheaper than gold. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 12:30 am
    BBC Newsnight [#17272Z] duration 28:18   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10465H] Economy * Mines in the Strait * China * Shields and Brooks * American Graduate- De'Qonton Davis duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 2:00 am
    Charlie Rose [#18200H] (original broadcast date: 9/28/12)
    * former President Bill Clinton on the Clinton Global Initiative
    * former Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, Tony Blair
    * Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:00 am
    Tavis Smiley [#2700] Tavis talks with actress Elizabeth Banks about her turn as film producer of her latest project, the feature film Pitch Perfect. duration 26:46   STEREO
  • 3:30 am
    Nightly Business Report [#31325Z] Regulators want to make mutual fund money markets safer. NBR's Washington Bureau Chief Darren Gersh has more on what the government is trying to do. The third quarter comes to a close and the fourth could be even better for investors. NBR's Suzanne Pratt takes a look. Stillwater Mining's CEO speaks with NBR's Tom Hudson about global demand and why platinum is cheaper than gold. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10465H] Economy * Mines in the Strait * China * Shields and Brooks * American Graduate- De'Qonton Davis duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:00 am
    Democracy Now! [#2045] duration 59:00   STEREO TVRE
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    Global 3000 [#438] Modern Slavery In Singapore Many domestic workers in Singapore suffer exploitation, abuse and even rape at the hands of their wealthy employers. Most of the women arrive here via agencies that recruit in the slums of Indonesia and the Philippines. They hope to earn enough money to help support their families back at home. But once they arrive in Singapore, they are at the mercy of their employers. Often, their passports are taken away from them. There are more than 200,000 such domestic servants in Singapore, and for many of them their workplace is little more than a prison. They're expected to be available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, and never get a day off, let alone a holiday. duration 26:10   STEREO
  • 6:30 am
    European Journal [#3038] The Fall of One of Europe's Paragon Economies In the past, Slovenia fulfilled all European stability criteria and was the first state from former communist Eastern Europe to adopt the euro. But now Slovenia is facing the prospect of default. In recent weeks, Slovenia has been under discussion as the next candidate for the European bailout scheme. The country's government, which is headed by a five-party coalition, has been unable to agree on austerity measures. As the crisis has demonstrated, Slovenia is particularly vulnerable because much of the economy - including major financial institutions - remains in state hands. Slovenia is now struggling with the after-effects of a collapsed real estate boom and the massive debt accumulated by its largest banks. duration 26:10   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1604H] THE UN & MUSLIM PROTESTS - As violent protests spread across the Muslim world over a film insulting the Prophet Muhammad, President Obama, at the UN, condemned the film and also issued a strong call for religious tolerance and freedom of speech. Meanwhile, some delegates want a UN resolution outlawing any defamation of religion. Host Bob Abernethy and Managing Editor Kim Lawton talk with Haris Tarin, Director of the Washington office of the Muslim Public Affairs Council.
    NONVIOLENT PEACEFORCE - In the Southern Philippines, an organization of unarmed civilian peacekeepers is monitoring and trying to preserve the fragile cease fire between the Philippine Army and Muslim rebels. Fred de Sam Lazaro reports from Mindanao that the peaceforce, co-founded by an American from Minnesota and which now also operates in other conflict areas, is trusted by both sides and seems to be effective.
    BELIEF AND PRACTICE: SUKKOT - Rabbi James Michaels of the Hebrew Homes of Greater Washington explains the meaning and practices of this holiday when Jews build temporary shelters to remember the 40 years their ancestors lived in the desert after their escape from Egypt.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#138H] United States of ALEC * This week, an unprecedented in-depth report on the most influential corporate-funded political force most of us have never heard of - ALEC, the American Legislative Exchange Council. A national consortium of state politicians and powerful corporations, ALEC presents itself as a "nonpartisan public-private partnership". But behind that mantra lies a vast network of corporate lobbying and political action aimed to increase corporate profits at public expense. Using interviews, documents, and personal accounts, the episode explores ALEC's self-serving machine at work, acting in a way one Wisconsin politician describes as "a corporate dating service for lonely legislators and corporate special interests."
    In state houses around the country, hundreds of pieces of boilerplate ALEC legislation are proposed or enacted that would, among other things, dilute collective bargaining rights, make it harder for some Americans to vote, and limit corporate liability for harm caused to consumers - each accomplished without the public ever knowing who's behind it. "All of us here are very familiar with ALEC and the influence that ALEC has with many of the [legislative] members," said Arizona State Senator Steve Farley. "Corporations have the right to present their arguments, but they don't have the right to do it secretly."
    "United States of ALEC" is a collaboration between Okapi Productions (the filmmakers Tom Casciato and Kathleen Hughes) and the Schumann Media Center, headed by Bill Moyers, which supports independent journalism and public watchdogs such as the Center for Media and Democracy, whose investigators are featured in the report.
    * Also appearing on the broadcast is Kathleen Hall Jamieson, the director of the University of Pennsylvania's Annenberg Public Policy Center and founder of FactCheck.org, who talks about deception and truth in the 2012 campaign.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:30 am
    Inside Washington [#2424] duration 26:46   TVG
  • 9:00 am
    Washington Week [#5213H] Gwen and the WW team travel to the heartland of Missouri this week for an Election 2012 broadcast from St. Louis.
    A number of new polls show President Barack Obama has opened up a significant lead over Republican nominee Mitt Romney in the battleground states of Ohio, Florida, and Pennsylvania. According to a New York Times/CBS News/Quinnipiac University poll, Mr. Obama holds a 10 point advantage over Mr. Romney in the must-win state of Ohio. Similarly, the president holds a 9 point lead over his Republican challenger in Florida and a 12 point lead in Pennsylvania.
    Early voting starts next week in Ohio so it's no surprise both candidates stumped for votes in the Buckeye State this week. For Mr. Romney, Ohio is pivotal to his presidential prospects. No Republican has ever won the White House without winning Ohio.
    Joining Gwen Ifill in St. Louis with analysis of the 2012 presidential race: Charles Babington of the Associated Press. Nia-Malika Henderson of The Washington Post, Jim Tankersley of National Journal, and Jeff Zeleny of The New York Times.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:30 am
    Heat and Harvest: Impact of Climate Change On California September 28, 2012 From the vast fields of fruits and nuts in the Central Valley to the waterways of the Sacramento Delta - and many growing centers in between - climate change is beginning to take its toll on California agriculture. According to a recent report commissioned by the state EPA and Energy Commission, yields in key crops are expected to drop significantly over the coming decades as climate change alters key growing conditions.
    The list of crops most directly affected under business as usual conditions, assuming a 2 degree warming by 2050, reads like a walk through a supermarket produce section: yields of citrus crops in the San Joaquin Valley are expected to drop about 18% by 2050; grapes about 6%; cherries and other orchard crops about 9%. But this is not just a look into the state's future. California's farms, often called the nation's breadbasket, are already feeling the effects of the trifecta of converging forces prompted by climate change: shorter cold seasons, longer seasons of extreme heat, and dwindling water supplies.
    This multi-platform collaboration of the Center for Investigative Reporting and KQED's science and environment reporting teams examines how climate change is already playing out in one of California's largest industries. Three documentary reports are woven into one comprehensive program.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 10:00 am
    QUEST [#608H] Agricultural Pests, Sylvia Earle As winters have become warmer, California is becoming more hospitable to destructive insect pests. QUEST investigates how climate change is impacting the state's massive farming industry. Plus, meet two ocean scientists: Stephen Palumbi, who reflects on his career studying tropical corals; and renowned deep sea explorer Sylvia Earle. duration 26:21   STEREO TVG
  • 10:30 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2129H] GIRLS WITH GUNS: Second Amendment advocates tweet pictures of their young daughters with guns in their hands. This after Republican Vice President nominee Paul Ryan was spotted purchasing hunting equipment for his 10-year-old daughter. Is this going too far?
    SCIENCE AND DISCRIMINATION: Female undergraduate science students learn their professors find them less competent than their male counterparts, even when their qualifications are equal.
    BPA IS FOUND TO BE UNSAFE: Studies have found that Bisphenol A, a by-product of plastic production, is unsafe for humans, especially women who are trying to get pregnant.
    Panelists: Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC); Progressive Commentator Patricia Sosa; Public Notice Executive Director Gretchen Hamel.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3040] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Need To Know [#255H] * NTK's Mona Iskander travels to Virginia, a vital swing state in the 2012 election, to examine how the state's Republican-controlled general assembly's efforts to curb access to abortion providers could affect the presidential contest.
    * Anchor Jeff Greenfield interviews Elaine Kamarck of the Harvard Kennedy School of Government.
    * In this week's essay, Greenfield offers an analysis of how the abortion debate has had an impact on previous presidential elections.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#138H] United States of ALEC * This week, an unprecedented in-depth report on the most influential corporate-funded political force most of us have never heard of - ALEC, the American Legislative Exchange Council. A national consortium of state politicians and powerful corporations, ALEC presents itself as a "nonpartisan public-private partnership". But behind that mantra lies a vast network of corporate lobbying and political action aimed to increase corporate profits at public expense. Using interviews, documents, and personal accounts, the episode explores ALEC's self-serving machine at work, acting in a way one Wisconsin politician describes as "a corporate dating service for lonely legislators and corporate special interests."
    In state houses around the country, hundreds of pieces of boilerplate ALEC legislation are proposed or enacted that would, among other things, dilute collective bargaining rights, make it harder for some Americans to vote, and limit corporate liability for harm caused to consumers - each accomplished without the public ever knowing who's behind it. "All of us here are very familiar with ALEC and the influence that ALEC has with many of the [legislative] members," said Arizona State Senator Steve Farley. "Corporations have the right to present their arguments, but they don't have the right to do it secretly."
    "United States of ALEC" is a collaboration between Okapi Productions (the filmmakers Tom Casciato and Kathleen Hughes) and the Schumann Media Center, headed by Bill Moyers, which supports independent journalism and public watchdogs such as the Center for Media and Democracy, whose investigators are featured in the report.
    * Also appearing on the broadcast is Kathleen Hall Jamieson, the director of the University of Pennsylvania's Annenberg Public Policy Center and founder of FactCheck.org, who talks about deception and truth in the 2012 campaign.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 1:00 pm
    This American Land [#209] Arctic White Geese, Veterans in the Great Outdoors, Tracking a Coral Killer Arctic White Geese: Snow geese and Ross's geese make an almost unimaginable 3,000-mile migration each year. So it's no wonder they enjoy spending a month or so in eastern Oregon, "bulking up" on tender grasses and nutritious bugs. The folks from Oregon Field Guide have captured the beauty of thousands of these birds on their stopover to the Arctic. Dedicated "citizen scientists" spend time during the birds' respite to study them. Some say the sky is so filled with geese that it often looks like a snowstorm!
    Veterans in the Great Outdoors: Some military veterans returning from combat have physical scars. Others have mental stresses that can also impact their families. We join the Sierra Club's Stacy Bare, a U.S. Army veteran, on an adventure down the Colorado River, where veterans deepen their connections with the land, and one another. The camaraderie and the healing power of nature come through in this beautiful and rugged setting.
    Tracking a Coral Killer: It's a detective story that has unfolded in the waters off Key West, Florida. What's been killing the Elkhorn coral? Biologist Kathryn Sutherland has identified human sewage as the source of the coral-killing pathogen that causes white pox disease. Elkhorn coral was listed for protection as an endangered species in 2006, largely due to white pox disease. Sutherland works with water treatment facilities in south Florida to try to make sure water is cleared of this pathogen before it goes back into the Atlantic.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 1:30 pm
    QUEST [#608H] Agricultural Pests, Sylvia Earle As winters have become warmer, California is becoming more hospitable to destructive insect pests. QUEST investigates how climate change is impacting the state's massive farming industry. Plus, meet two ocean scientists: Stephen Palumbi, who reflects on his career studying tropical corals; and renowned deep sea explorer Sylvia Earle. duration 26:21   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    Miller Center Forums [#1506] Marcus Brauchli and Chris Cillizza - The Long Battle Ahead: The 2012 Presidential Election and How The Washington Post W Marcus Brauchli, Washington Post executive editor, oversees print and digital news operations. Previously, he had served as managing editor of The Wall Street Journal, overseeing its print and online news operations, both in the US and internationally. Chris Cillizza writes "The Fix," a politics blog for The Washington Post. He also covers the White House for the newspaper and web site. Cillizza has appeared as a guest on NBC, CBS, ABC, MSNBC, Fox News Channel, and CNN. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 pm
    POV [#2405H] Biblioburro, The Donkey Library "Biblioburro" is the story of a librarian - and a library - like no other. A decade ago, Colombian teacher Luis Soriano was inspired to spend his weekends bringing a modest collection of precious books, via two hard-working donkeys, to the children of a poor and violence-ridden province. As Soriano braves armed bands, drug traffickers, snakes and heat, his library on hooves carries an inspirational message about education and a better future for Colombia. His efforts have attracted worldwide attention - and imitators - but his story has never been better told than in this film. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 4:00 pm
    My Future Baby 7.3 million Americans are struggling with fertility issues right now. In November 2009, the World Health Organization classified infertility as a disease. For those thinking about starting a family, the actual physiology behind what makes it possible to have a baby is often a mystery. And yet this knowledge can be the difference between the family of one's dreams, and a difficult if not impossible pregnancy. In My Future Baby, a non-fiction television special, the viewer is taken into the Santa Monica Fertility center where world renowned fertility expert, Dr. John Jain, along with the top experts in the field of reproductive medicine, explains the latest breakthroughs in fertility options and procedures. On camera, the viewer will meet women and couples currently undergoing fertility treatment in hopes of getting pregnant or preserving their fertility for the future. Advanced scientific procedures in modern fertility, and their likelihood of success based on age and other health factors are explained candidly. With stunning 4D animations of inside the human body, and micro-lens close-ups from the medical procedures themselves, My Future Baby illuminates fertility as it has never been seen before. duration 56:40   STEREO TVPG
  • 5:00 pm
    Global Voices [#119] Greener Grass: Cuba, Baseball and the United States Since 1866, Cubans have lovingly played baseball, a game that represented independence and modernity. Both Cuba and the U.S. embraced the game, but in distinct ways. Set against the backdrop of the choppy history of U.S.-Cuban relations, this program documents how both countries have used baseball as a political tool and how the sport has operated as both bridge and barrier between the two lands. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    McLaughlin Group [#3040] duration 27:30   TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Washington Week [#5213H] Gwen and the WW team travel to the heartland of Missouri this week for an Election 2012 broadcast from St. Louis.
    A number of new polls show President Barack Obama has opened up a significant lead over Republican nominee Mitt Romney in the battleground states of Ohio, Florida, and Pennsylvania. According to a New York Times/CBS News/Quinnipiac University poll, Mr. Obama holds a 10 point advantage over Mr. Romney in the must-win state of Ohio. Similarly, the president holds a 9 point lead over his Republican challenger in Florida and a 12 point lead in Pennsylvania.
    Early voting starts next week in Ohio so it's no surprise both candidates stumped for votes in the Buckeye State this week. For Mr. Romney, Ohio is pivotal to his presidential prospects. No Republican has ever won the White House without winning Ohio.
    Joining Gwen Ifill in St. Louis with analysis of the 2012 presidential race: Charles Babington of the Associated Press. Nia-Malika Henderson of The Washington Post, Jim Tankersley of National Journal, and Jeff Zeleny of The New York Times.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 pm
    Heat and Harvest: Impact of Climate Change On California September 28, 2012 From the vast fields of fruits and nuts in the Central Valley to the waterways of the Sacramento Delta - and many growing centers in between - climate change is beginning to take its toll on California agriculture. According to a recent report commissioned by the state EPA and Energy Commission, yields in key crops are expected to drop significantly over the coming decades as climate change alters key growing conditions.
    The list of crops most directly affected under business as usual conditions, assuming a 2 degree warming by 2050, reads like a walk through a supermarket produce section: yields of citrus crops in the San Joaquin Valley are expected to drop about 18% by 2050; grapes about 6%; cherries and other orchard crops about 9%. But this is not just a look into the state's future. California's farms, often called the nation's breadbasket, are already feeling the effects of the trifecta of converging forces prompted by climate change: shorter cold seasons, longer seasons of extreme heat, and dwindling water supplies.
    This multi-platform collaboration of the Center for Investigative Reporting and KQED's science and environment reporting teams examines how climate change is already playing out in one of California's largest industries. Three documentary reports are woven into one comprehensive program.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 7:30 pm
    QUEST [#608H] Agricultural Pests, Sylvia Earle As winters have become warmer, California is becoming more hospitable to destructive insect pests. QUEST investigates how climate change is impacting the state's massive farming industry. Plus, meet two ocean scientists: Stephen Palumbi, who reflects on his career studying tropical corals; and renowned deep sea explorer Sylvia Earle. duration 26:21   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1122] Panama & Colombia Megan takes a trip through Colombia and Panama, two countries that are refreshingly untouched by mass tourism. In Panama City, Megan tries different Panama hats, which she learns are really from Ecuador but were misnamed as far back as the1850s when Americans were building the railroad during the Gold Rush. She visits the Panama Canal, the crucial byway that generates $1 billion a year for the Panamanian economy. In Colombia, Megan finds herself witness to a point-blank shooting. Undeterred, she decides to learn more about the country's crime-ridden history. She stops by Bogota's police museum to see an exhibition of the infamous drug dealer Pablo Escobar, and then visits the Caribbean coast and the beautiful historic city of Cartagena, where she learns about the city's Spanish colonial past and listens to some of Colombia's most popular rhythms, Vallenato. duration 56:27   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 9:00 pm
    Nature [#2902H] The Animal House Animals build homes for reasons very similar to our own, but they've been doing it for much longer. From a small depression in the sand to an elaborate, multi-chambered tunnel - animal structures can be simple or architectural marvels. In each case, the goal is the same - protection from predators and a nearby source of food. These structures, whether a nest, a burrow or a mound, are also the site of great dramas and extraordinary behaviors. From master builders like termites and beavers, to master decorators like the bowerbird, which places colorful flowers at the entrance to its nest, "The Animal House" will be a global look at the "homelife of wildlife." duration 56:16   SRND51 TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 10:00 pm
    Nova [#3804H] Making Stuff Cleaner Most modern materials are dangerous to the environment, but what about cleaning up our world? Batteries grown from viruses, tires made from orange peel oil, plastics made of sugar, and solar cells that cook up hydrogen-these are just a few glimpses of a new generation of clean materials that could power devices of the future. In Making Stuff Cleaner, David Pogue explores the rapidly developing science and business of clean energy and examines alternative ways to generate it, store it, and distribute it. Is hydrogen the way to go? One scientist is even using America's abundance of chicken feathers to create a cheap way to make hydrogen cars safer. What about lithium batteries? Does this solve an energy problem or create a new dependency - in this case, on South America for a different kind of limited resource than oil? Can scientists instead develop a process in which batteries run on molten salts found in cheap abundance in the US or on genetically engineered viruses? Pogue investigates the latest developments in biobased fuels and in harnessing solar energy for our cars, homes, and industry in a fascinating hour full of the "stuff" of a sustainable future. duration 56:16   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 11:00 pm
    Nova [#3805H] Making Stuff Smarter What can nature teach us about building smarter materials? Can we create materials that sense and respond? "When describing 'smart materials,' one analogy scientists give is the evolution from the first Terminator robot, a machine made of metal and circuitry, to the shape-shifting 'liquid guy' in Terminator 2," said Making Stuff producer Chris Schmidt. Smarter looks into the growing number of materials that almost seem alive - able to react, change and even learn. An Army tanker truck that heals its own bullet wounds. An airplane wing that changes shape as it flies. For inspirations and ideas, scientists are turning to nature and biology and producing some innovative new developments in materials science. Knowledge and inspiration drawn from nature are showing scientists new ways to give our materials amazing new abilities. By understanding how geckos climb even smooth walls, scientists have created a gecko adhesive that let's robots do the same. Studying the properties of skin has led to the development of self-healing protective foam. And Pogue literally goes swimming with sharks to understand a different kind of skin that is intriguing scientists. Scientists are modeling a material after sharkskin to develop an antibacterial film that, when sprayed in hospitals, could eliminate MRSA and other anti-biotic resistant bacteria. Pogue concludes "Smarter" with a visit to a scientist who has created a material that may make Harry potter's invisibility cloak a reality! duration 56:16   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 12:00 am
    Richard Bangs' Adventures with Purpose "New Zealand: Quest for Kaitiakitanga" Richard travels to the southernmost reaches of civilization to uncover New Zealand's pristine natural beauty, alluring culture and enigmatic mythology. He traverses the most physically and climatically diverse landmass in Polynesia in the pursuit of an age-old Maori tradition. Bangs seeks answers to questions rooted in indigenous wisdom, hoping to unearth the meaning and origins of "kaitiakitanga," the responsibility of human beings to protect the natural world. Today's Kiwis believe the knowledge of the ancients may hold a key to the planet's survival.
    Bangs begins his 1000-mile trek in Mt. Aspiring National Park, where he navigates north to the Franz Joseph Glacier and then to the east coast town of Kaikoura. From there, he crosses the Cook Strait to the North Island and the capital city of Wellington. He next visits the Taupo region, heads to Hokianga Harbor, and finally makes his way to Cape Reinga on the upper tip of New Zealand, where he encounters the great tangled "spirit tree" of Maori myth.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
Saturday, September 29, 2012

Navigate By Date

Calendar is loading...
Become a KQED sponsor

TV Technical Issues

TV
    TV Technical Issues
    • KQET Off Air Sun 8/03 morning

      (DT25.1, 25.2, 25.3) KQET DT25 was off the air for a portion of Sunday morning, due to the transmitter taking a power hit. The signal has been restored. Most receivers should have re-acquired our signal once it returned, but a few Over the Air viewers may need to do a rescan in order to restore […]

    • KQED DT9s Over the Air: beginning Wed 7/09

      (DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3) The PSIP Info part of our Over the Air (OTA) signal for KQED DT9.1, 9.2, 9.3 dropped out of our overall signal early Wednesday 7/09. Once PSIP was restored most OTA receivers moved our signal back to the correct channel locations. However, for some viewers, it appears as if they have lost […]

    • KQED FM 88.1 translator off air Tues 6/03

      The Martinez translator for KQED-FM will be off the air all day Tuesday June 3rd. We are rebuilding the 25 year old site with all new antennas and cabling. This should only affect people listening on 88.1MHz in the Martinez/Benicia area.

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Comcast 9 and 709
Digital 9.1, 54.2 or 25.1

All widescreen and HD programs

KQED Plus

Channel 54
Comcast 10 and 710
Digital 9.2, 54.1 or 25.2

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life
Comcast 189
Digital 54.3

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Comcast 190
Digital 9.3

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Comcast 191 & 621
Digital 54.5 or 25.3

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Comcast 192
Digital 54.4

Quality children's programming parents love too