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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

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KQED World: Saturday, April 25, 2015

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, April 25, 2015
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#11214] RULES OF WAR - The debate over using drones for counterterror missions has intensified after it was confirmed yesterday that two al-Qaida hostages, an American and an Italian, were accidently killed by U.S. drones inside Pakistan. Judy Woodruff speaks to Greg Miller, the Washington Post's intelligence reporter.
    100 YEARS LATER - This week marks the 100th anniversary of the 1915 Armenian killings, an atrocity that occurred in the final days of the Ottoman Empire. President Obama announced this week that he will stop short of calling the massacre a genocide, despite calls from Armenian-Americans and human rights groups to do so. Judy Woodruff hears two views in this debate from Soner Cagaptay, director of the Turkish Research Program at The Washington Institute for Near East Policy, and Hrach Gregorian, an adjunct professor at American University and president of the Institute of World Affairs.
    POWER MAP - The recent Ebola epidemic has led to new research aimed at predicting disease outbreaks throughout the world. Data collected from that research can now be harnessed to target other diseases, such as malaria, and to pinpoint environmental problems. Special correspondent Spencer Michels reports.
    WINDOW TO THE UNIVERSE - NASA's Hubble Space Telescope is celebrating its 25th anniversary this week. Judy Woodruff discusses the telescope's journey through space to map the stars with science correspondent Miles O'Brien.
    NEWSHOUR BOOKSHELF - In his new book, "Missoula: Rape and the Justice System in a College Town," author Jon Krakauer takes on the pervasive issue of sexual assault on college campuses, and the struggle to bring perpetrators to justice. Jeffrey Brown recently sat down with Krakauer to discuss the book at Busboys and Poets, a bookstore and restaurant chain in and around Washington, D.C.
    SHIELDS AND BROOKS - Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and the New York Times' David Brooks analyze the week's top stories.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#34082] duration 28:00   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#3489] Tavis talks with author and NYU instructor Michael Gould-Wartofsky about his new text The Occupiers: The Making of the 99 Percent Movement. Tavis also talks with ROC-United Co-Founder Saru Jayaraman. The Co-Founder of Restaurant Opportunities Centers United and Director of UC Berkeley's Food Labor Research Center discusses the recent nationwide "Fight for $15" demonstrations, which was the largest protest by low-wage earners in American history. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Pacific Heartbeat [#403] Road to the Globe In 2010, the home of Shakespeare - The Globe Theatre in London, England - issued a proclamation outlining the world's biggest Shakespearean festival: 36 countries, 36 Shakespearean plays, 36 languages. New Zealand actor Rawiri Paratene answered the call and was given the honor to open the festival. Spanning the twelve-week period before Opening Night, this program follows Rawiri as he forms his own company, Ngakau Toa, consisting of New Zealand's best Maori actors, and their journey as they prepare to take their Maori adaption of William Shakespeare's Troilus and Cressida to The Globe. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1834] * Evangelicals and LGBT Acceptance - What challenges does growing social acceptance of same-sex marriage and other LGBT issues pose for evangelicals? On April 28, the US Supreme Court hears oral arguments in a case that could legalize same-sex marriage across the country, and religious groups have filed briefs on both sides. R&E visits Nashville, Tennessee to report on the extent to which evangelicals are reexamining their views about sexuality, marriage, and LGBT acceptance. Kim Lawton talks to singer-songwriter Jennifer Knapp; Russell Moore, president of the Southern Baptist Convention's Ethics &Religious Liberty Commission; Matthew Vines, author of "God and the Gay Christian"; and more.
    * America's Incarcerated - Today the US has more people in prison than any other country in the world - more than 2 million Americans. A disproportionate number of them are African Americans. Tim O'Brien asks criminal justice reformer Bryan Stevenson, executive director of the Equal Justice Initiative in Montgomery, Alabama, about the social and economic costs of extreme punishments, lengthy sentences, and "a history of racial inequality and injustice that has left us vulnerable to presuming guilt and dangerousness when minority people interact with the criminal justice system."
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1144] Maximizing Medicare An estimated 95% of seniors pay too much for Medicare. This week's WT features healthcare expert Katy Votava, president of Goodcare.com and author of Making the Most of Medicare, who explains what you need to know to maximize those benefits and avoid overpaying. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2407] *A new documentary Gender Equality in Islam
    *Islam has some 1.6 billion followers around the world, making it the world's second-largest religion after Christianity. That said, a new crop of female Islamic scholars says there is nothing in the Koran that treats women unequally.
    *Instead, they argue, through the years, Muslim women have been marginalized by cultural practices and patriarchal interpretations. These reformers say Quranic verses have been wrongly interpreted to favor men. And now is the time to observe its true meaning and treat Muslim women the same as Muslim men.
    * Dr. Azizah Al-Hibri, a law professor and Islamic scholar started a non- profit organization called Karamah - a name that comes from the Qur'anic verse which reads: "We have given dignity to the Children of Adam."
    *Karamah's goal is to advance the gender-equitable principles of Islam to Muslim women in the U.S. and around the world and to support the rights of Muslim women through education programs, scholarships, and a network of Muslim jurists and leaders.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:30 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3318H] duration 27:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:00 am
    American Masters [#2403] James Levine: America's Maestro To celebrate his 40th anniversary at the Metropolitan Opera in 2011, conductor James Levine's life and current work were the subject of this documentary, which captures the essence of his unparalleled musicianship and his singular teaching and performance style, while looking back at creative milestones since his Met debut in 1971 at the age of 28.
    Over the course of a year, filmmaker Susan Froemke followed Levine. Included in the film are intimate scenes between the maestro and longtime collaborator Placido Domingo as they rehearse Verdi's Simon Boccanegra; intense rehearsals with the Met Orchestra as they prepare for their first performance of Beethoven's 5th Symphony at Carnegie Hall; and Levine's poignant coaching sessions with aspiring young singers preparing to launch their careers. The film provides a revealing portrait of one of classical music's giants, exploring how Levine transformed the Met's orchestra into one of the great ensembles, elicited legendary performances from leading singers, and nurtured new generations of artists.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    American Masters [#2802] Jascha Heifetz: God's Fiddler Discover the mysterious violin virtuoso through Itzhak Perlman, students, archival performances and home movies. His story embodies the paradox of artistic genius: how a mortal man lives with immortal gifts, honored at a lifelong price. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1834] * Evangelicals and LGBT Acceptance - What challenges does growing social acceptance of same-sex marriage and other LGBT issues pose for evangelicals? On April 28, the US Supreme Court hears oral arguments in a case that could legalize same-sex marriage across the country, and religious groups have filed briefs on both sides. R&E visits Nashville, Tennessee to report on the extent to which evangelicals are reexamining their views about sexuality, marriage, and LGBT acceptance. Kim Lawton talks to singer-songwriter Jennifer Knapp; Russell Moore, president of the Southern Baptist Convention's Ethics &Religious Liberty Commission; Matthew Vines, author of "God and the Gay Christian"; and more.
    * America's Incarcerated - Today the US has more people in prison than any other country in the world - more than 2 million Americans. A disproportionate number of them are African Americans. Tim O'Brien asks criminal justice reformer Bryan Stevenson, executive director of the Equal Justice Initiative in Montgomery, Alabama, about the social and economic costs of extreme punishments, lengthy sentences, and "a history of racial inequality and injustice that has left us vulnerable to presuming guilt and dangerousness when minority people interact with the criminal justice system."
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:30 am
    Charlie Rose - The Week [#240H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 8:00 am
    Global 3000 [#717] Castoff Clothing Into Designer Wear Tunisia: Jellyfish Scourge in the Mediterranean - The number of jellyfish in the Mediterranean Sea is increasing at an alarming rate. Conditions for the creatures are best at the height of summer. One of the factors contributing to their spread is climate change. Local fishermen and women, as well as the tourism industry on the North African coast are feeling the effects. In Tunisia, researchers, the government and those in the fishing industry are desperately looking for a solution. The species causing the most problems are those not native to the Mediterranean Sea. Many tourists are turned off by the prospect of encountering jellyfish on the beach. An EU project comprising Mediterranean countries is working together with Tunisia to finding a long-term solution. Vietnam: In Nguyen van Quy's Living Room - Nguyen van Quy lives in Hanoi, where he composes instrumental music. He says Beethoven is his idol because he learnt nearly everything from him. The great German composer inspired him to write his own sonatas. Bolivia: Dreaming of the Sea - Bolivia lost its coastline more than 130 years ago in the so-called War of the Pacific against Chile. Many Bolivian people have never recovered from the loss; the matter is still considered a national trauma. The country still has a navy, which is preparing for the day Bolivia regains access to the sea. Like most Bolivians, many sailors in the navy have never even seen the sea. They train on Lake Titicaca, 3800 meters above sea level. Mozambique: Transforming Second-Hand Clothes into Designer Wear - Second-hand clothing comprises about half of the textiles imported to Mozambique. Few people in the country can afford to buy new clothes. Twin sisters Nelly and Nelsa Guambe have turned that trend into a successful business model. It's the first of its kind in the country. They re-custom clothes from all over the world, particularly from Europe. The designers describe the style as "modern vintage." The pair used to make their own clothes because they couldn't afford to buy any. duration 26:00   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:30 am
    Focus On Europe [#3317] Mediterranean: Mass Grave for Refugees Italy: Mediterranean becomes mass grave for refugees - A growing number of refugees are drowning as they seek to cross the Mediterranean. Several boats have capsized in the past two weeks alone, and hundreds of people have died. The UN has called it the largest loss of life ever in the sea. Until the end of last year, an Italian mission involving ships from the country's navy rushed to rescue refugees at sea, often close to the Libyan coast. Now that job has been left to a joint EU operation known as Triton, which only patrols a 30-mile zone off Italy's coast. Last year, an estimated 200, 000 people crossed the Mediterranean to reach Europe. Thousands of them died in the attempt. Cyprus: Could cheese unite the island? Halloumi cheese isn't just an age-old specialty of Cyprus, it is also one of the island's major exports. To keep it that way, the Cypriot government has asked the EU to grant halloumi "protected designation of origin" status. The island's Turkish north was initially against the idea. But now, for the first time in 40 years, Greek and Turkish Cypriots are cooperating - all in the name of cheese. In 1974, Turkish troops occupied the north, taking a third of the island. Since then, Cyprus has been divided into the Greek-dominated south and the Turkish-dominated north. Ukraine: German supporters fight alongside Pro-Russian militia - In eastern Ukraine, Germans are fighting alongside pro-Russian rebels. Most of these fighters are repatriated ethnic Germans from Russia. Many have even served in Germany's military, the Bundeswehr. Now they could lose their German citizenship. Many young Germans involved in the conflict are currently bragging online, posting pictures and videos of themselves wearing uniforms and carrying heavy weapons. 2, 500 kilometers from home, they're fighting the Ukrainian army alongside Russian-supported militias. Pro-Russian rebels are seeking autonomy from Ukraine for the Donetsk and Luhansk regions. Switzerland: Heli-skiing tourism - ecological attack? Every year, around 15,000 helicopter flights transport skiers to the most remote glaciers and slopes in the Swiss Alps. Half of the landing zones are in or near nature preserves. Environmentalists are now fighting back against what they view as an ecological attack. For years, environmental organizations have been trying to protect wildlife from the deafening noise of helicopters. But they've been unsuccessful in winning a ban on what's called heli-ski tourism, or even a reduction in the number of flights. The helicopters land at 40 sites on alpine summits. Heli-skiing for the super-rich is a lucrative business. Britain: Traffic vigilante - Traffic in Britain's capital is not for the faint-hearted. Millions struggle through rush hour every day, and many drivers pay little attention to traffic laws. But they didn't expect to encounter Dave Sherry. Sherry is a bus driver, but in his free time he mounts his bike, puts on a helmet camera and heads back into London's river of traffic. He films violations in the city and publishes his videos on the Internet. 70 offenders have already been brought to court because of his evidence. The police say they're thankful for the help of the self-appointed traffic vigilante. duration 26:10   STEREO TVG
  • 9:00 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5441] * President Obama apologized for the US counterterrorism operation that targeted a suspected al Qaeda compound in Pakistan but inadvertently killed two innocent hostages being held by the group. Mark Mazzetti of The New York Times reports on the US drone strikes that killed the American and Italian citizens who were being held captive.
    * Juana Summers of NPR reports on the historic confirmation of Loretta Lynch as the first female, African-American Attorney General following a five-month partisan battle over an unrelated bill.
    * Jeff Zeleny of CNN takes a closer look at the new attacks against Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton that call into question foreign donations made to the Clinton Foundation.
    * Hannah Allam of McClatchy Newspapers has the latest on the US Navy operations off the coast of Yemen that are monitoring Iranian ships that may be carrying weapons for Houthi rebels. She explains how the Obama administration is mindful that any reaction to Iran's involvement in Yemen might have an impact on talks regarding the Iranian nuclear program.
    * Plus, hear The New York Times' Peter Baker explain why President Abraham Lincoln is the one president all future presidents want to emulate.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:30 am
    KQED NEWSROOM [#225H] Bay Area Public Transportation
    Bay Area Public Transportation
    Getting around the Bay Area can be difficult. Traffic is a mess and public transportation isn't always easy. KQED NEWSROOM's Scott Shafer and Thuy Vu talk to the leaders of BART, Caltrain, Muni and VTA about what is and isn't working with the Bay Area's biggest transit systems.

    Guests:
    • Grace Crunican, general manager of BART
    • Ed Reiskin, director of transportation of San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency
    • Jim Hartnett, general manager of San Mateo County Transit District
    • Michael Hursh, chief operating officer of Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority
    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 10:00 am
    BBC Newsnight [#17114H] duration 28:18   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2407] *A new documentary Gender Equality in Islam
    *Islam has some 1.6 billion followers around the world, making it the world's second-largest religion after Christianity. That said, a new crop of female Islamic scholars says there is nothing in the Koran that treats women unequally.
    *Instead, they argue, through the years, Muslim women have been marginalized by cultural practices and patriarchal interpretations. These reformers say Quranic verses have been wrongly interpreted to favor men. And now is the time to observe its true meaning and treat Muslim women the same as Muslim men.
    * Dr. Azizah Al-Hibri, a law professor and Islamic scholar started a non- profit organization called Karamah - a name that comes from the Qur'anic verse which reads: "We have given dignity to the Children of Adam."
    *Karamah's goal is to advance the gender-equitable principles of Islam to Muslim women in the U.S. and around the world and to support the rights of Muslim women through education programs, scholarships, and a network of Muslim jurists and leaders.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 11:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3318H] duration 27:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Charlie Rose - The Week [#240H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    KQED NEWSROOM [#225H] Bay Area Public Transportation
    Bay Area Public Transportation
    Getting around the Bay Area can be difficult. Traffic is a mess and public transportation isn't always easy. KQED NEWSROOM's Scott Shafer and Thuy Vu talk to the leaders of BART, Caltrain, Muni and VTA about what is and isn't working with the Bay Area's biggest transit systems.

    Guests:
    • Grace Crunican, general manager of BART
    • Ed Reiskin, director of transportation of San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency
    • Jim Hartnett, general manager of San Mateo County Transit District
    • Michael Hursh, chief operating officer of Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority
    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 12:30 pm
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1834] * Evangelicals and LGBT Acceptance - What challenges does growing social acceptance of same-sex marriage and other LGBT issues pose for evangelicals? On April 28, the US Supreme Court hears oral arguments in a case that could legalize same-sex marriage across the country, and religious groups have filed briefs on both sides. R&E visits Nashville, Tennessee to report on the extent to which evangelicals are reexamining their views about sexuality, marriage, and LGBT acceptance. Kim Lawton talks to singer-songwriter Jennifer Knapp; Russell Moore, president of the Southern Baptist Convention's Ethics &Religious Liberty Commission; Matthew Vines, author of "God and the Gay Christian"; and more.
    * America's Incarcerated - Today the US has more people in prison than any other country in the world - more than 2 million Americans. A disproportionate number of them are African Americans. Tim O'Brien asks criminal justice reformer Bryan Stevenson, executive director of the Equal Justice Initiative in Montgomery, Alabama, about the social and economic costs of extreme punishments, lengthy sentences, and "a history of racial inequality and injustice that has left us vulnerable to presuming guilt and dangerousness when minority people interact with the criminal justice system."
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 pm
    QUEST [#204H] Earth Day Special: Where We've Been, Where We're Headed Explore the birth of the Bay Area's environmental movement a generation ago, then see what gains have been made and what challenges remain. duration 26:47   STEREO TVG
  • 1:30 pm
    Global 3000 [#717] Castoff Clothing Into Designer Wear Tunisia: Jellyfish Scourge in the Mediterranean - The number of jellyfish in the Mediterranean Sea is increasing at an alarming rate. Conditions for the creatures are best at the height of summer. One of the factors contributing to their spread is climate change. Local fishermen and women, as well as the tourism industry on the North African coast are feeling the effects. In Tunisia, researchers, the government and those in the fishing industry are desperately looking for a solution. The species causing the most problems are those not native to the Mediterranean Sea. Many tourists are turned off by the prospect of encountering jellyfish on the beach. An EU project comprising Mediterranean countries is working together with Tunisia to finding a long-term solution. Vietnam: In Nguyen van Quy's Living Room - Nguyen van Quy lives in Hanoi, where he composes instrumental music. He says Beethoven is his idol because he learnt nearly everything from him. The great German composer inspired him to write his own sonatas. Bolivia: Dreaming of the Sea - Bolivia lost its coastline more than 130 years ago in the so-called War of the Pacific against Chile. Many Bolivian people have never recovered from the loss; the matter is still considered a national trauma. The country still has a navy, which is preparing for the day Bolivia regains access to the sea. Like most Bolivians, many sailors in the navy have never even seen the sea. They train on Lake Titicaca, 3800 meters above sea level. Mozambique: Transforming Second-Hand Clothes into Designer Wear - Second-hand clothing comprises about half of the textiles imported to Mozambique. Few people in the country can afford to buy new clothes. Twin sisters Nelly and Nelsa Guambe have turned that trend into a successful business model. It's the first of its kind in the country. They re-custom clothes from all over the world, particularly from Europe. The designers describe the style as "modern vintage." The pair used to make their own clothes because they couldn't afford to buy any. duration 26:00   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 pm
    Bitter Seeds Biotechnology is changing the way farming is done all over the world. Advocates believe the New Green Revolution is the only way to provide sufficient food for the world's growing population while opponents raise environmental concerns and fear that GMOs drive small scale farmers off the land. This documentary explores the controversy - from a village in India that uses genetically modified seeds to US government that promote them.
    Bitter Seeds is the final film in Micha X. Peled's Globalization Trilogy, following Store Wars: When Wal-Mart Comes to Town (2001-2003) and China Blue (2007-2012). The films won 18 international awards, aired on KQED and over 30 other TV channels, and screened in more than 100 film festivals. They also connected viewers to NGO action campaigns and encouraged Western consumers to understand their impact on the rest of the world.
    duration 56:41   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 pm
    Rebels with a Cause Narrated by Oscar-winning actress Frances McDormand, this program spotlights a group of dedicated conservationists who fought to preserve open space, protect agriculture and wildlife, and establish public parks near San Francisco. Beginning in the 1950s, ordinary citizens from all walks of life, concerned by the intentions of residential land developers and the environmental cost of "progress," began banding together to save a vast stretch of Northern California coastline. Their passionate activism at both the local and federal level helped create Point Reyes National Seashore and the Golden Gate National Recreation Area. These precedent-setting efforts also raised Californians' awareness of their power to promote change, fostered a national movement to preserve open spaces, and shaped the environmental movement of today. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 4:00 pm
    Digging Into The Future: Armenia During this archeological adventure, travel writer Joseph Rosendo crisscrosses Armenia to ancient sites where some of the world's oldest artifacts have been discovered. Every site offers viewers insights into how the Armenians of the distant and near past lived - and what is discovered about the past serves the present. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 5:00 pm
    The Armenian Genocide The complete story of the first Genocide of the 20th century - when over a million Armenians died at the hands of the Ottoman Turks during World War I (April 24, 1915). Featuring interviews with leading experts in the field such as Pulitzer Prize-winning author Samantha Power and New York Times best-selling author Peter Balakian, and historical footage of the events. Narrated by Julianna Margulies and includes historical narrations by Ed Harris, Natalie Portman, Laura Linney and Orlando Bloom, among others. duration 56:25   STEREO TVPG-V
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour Weekend [#367H] On Saturday, NewsHour Weekend explores the water crisis in Israel, where over the past few years, the country's water shortage has become a surplus. Through a combination of conservation, reuse and desalination, Israel now has more water than it needs. And that could translate into political progress for the country in the Middle East, one of the most water-stressed regions in the world. NewsHour's Martin Fletcher reports from Israel. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5441] * President Obama apologized for the US counterterrorism operation that targeted a suspected al Qaeda compound in Pakistan but inadvertently killed two innocent hostages being held by the group. Mark Mazzetti of The New York Times reports on the US drone strikes that killed the American and Italian citizens who were being held captive.
    * Juana Summers of NPR reports on the historic confirmation of Loretta Lynch as the first female, African-American Attorney General following a five-month partisan battle over an unrelated bill.
    * Jeff Zeleny of CNN takes a closer look at the new attacks against Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton that call into question foreign donations made to the Clinton Foundation.
    * Hannah Allam of McClatchy Newspapers has the latest on the US Navy operations off the coast of Yemen that are monitoring Iranian ships that may be carrying weapons for Houthi rebels. She explains how the Obama administration is mindful that any reaction to Iran's involvement in Yemen might have an impact on talks regarding the Iranian nuclear program.
    * Plus, hear The New York Times' Peter Baker explain why President Abraham Lincoln is the one president all future presidents want to emulate.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:00 pm
    KQED NEWSROOM [#225H] Bay Area Public Transportation
    Bay Area Public Transportation
    Getting around the Bay Area can be difficult. Traffic is a mess and public transportation isn't always easy. KQED NEWSROOM's Scott Shafer and Thuy Vu talk to the leaders of BART, Caltrain, Muni and VTA about what is and isn't working with the Bay Area's biggest transit systems.

    Guests:
    • Grace Crunican, general manager of BART
    • Ed Reiskin, director of transportation of San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency
    • Jim Hartnett, general manager of San Mateo County Transit District
    • Michael Hursh, chief operating officer of Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority
    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 7:30 pm
    QUEST [#204H] Earth Day Special: Where We've Been, Where We're Headed Explore the birth of the Bay Area's environmental movement a generation ago, then see what gains have been made and what challenges remain. duration 26:47   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1403H] Tough Trains: Vietnam Zay discovers the checkered and often-dangerous history of the Vietnamese railway. His perilous journey takes him to Hanoi, Hue, the DMZ and Ho Chi Minh City where he meets a general who led the final attack on the Presidential Palace during the Vietnam War. duration 57:54   STEREO TVPG
  • 9:00 pm
    Nature [#3210] Animal Homes: Animal Cities For some animals, living in the midst of huge colonies of their own kind is the most secure and rewarding housing arrangement. Icelandic puffins form nesting colonies of more than a million, providing shared information about food sources and reducing the odds of attacks on individual birds. But colonies are useful for predators, too. Social spiders in Ecuador work together to capture prey 20 times the size an individual might subdue on its own. For others, communal living provides multi-generational care-giving options or the opportunity to build enormous cities like the acre-wide multi-million-citizen colonies built by leaf cutter ants in Costa Rica, or Australia's Great Barrier Reef, built entirely by tiny corals. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:00 pm
    Nova [#4208H] Invisible Universe Revealed 25 years ago, NASA launched one of the most ambitious experiments in the history of astronomy: the Hubble Space Telescope. In honor of Hubble's landmark anniversary, Nova tells the remarkable story of the telescope that forever changed our understanding of the cosmos and our place in it.
    From its inception through its early days, when a one-millimeter engineering blunder turned the telescope into an object of ridicule, to the five heroic astronaut missions that returned Hubble to the cutting edge of science, Nova hears from the scientists and engineers on the front line who tell the amazing Hubble story as never before. This single telescope has helped astronomers pinpoint the age of the universe, revealed the birthplace of stars and planets, advanced our understanding of dark energy and cosmic expansion, and uncovered black holes lurking at the heart of galaxies. For more than a generation, Hubble's stunning images have brought the beauty of the heavens to millions, revealing a cosmos richer and more wondrous than we ever imagined. Join Nova for the story of this magnificent machine and its astonishing discoveries.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 11:00 pm
    America Reframed [#316] Hanna Ranch A portrait of cattleman Kirk Hanna and his personal struggle to protect a once prominent way of life in Colorado. Born into a life on the family ranch, Hanna became a leader in the environmental ranching movement that set out to protect the West from the relentless encroachment of development and misuse. duration 1:29:50   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:30 am
    Chattahoochee Unplugged An Olympic-class whitewater run through the middle of a busy downtown. Sounds like a impossible dream but it's happening in Columbus, Georgia, and its Alabama neighbor, Phenix City. More than 20 years ago canoe enthusiast and outdoor store owner, Neal Wickham, dreamed of running rapids in his own backyard on the Chattahoochee River. But there was a problem - those rapids lay submerged beneath the waters held back by two aging rock and masonry dams. The dams were built more than a century ago after the Civil War. They powered Columbus's booming textile business. Eventually that business moved elsewhere leaving behind a blighted riverfront, empty mills and disused dams in danger of failing. But it takes more than a few sticks of dynamite to get rid of a dam. This documentary, filmed over the course of two years, explores how local businessman, John Turner and the civic organization, Uptown Columbus had to raise millions of dollars. They enlisted the services of Olympic whitewater designer, Rick McLaughlin, the US Army Corps of Engineers and many other experts. The best environmental science converged with state-of-the-art engineering and construction to realize a much grander dream: to return a critical 2. 5 mile stretch of the Chattahoochee, one of the largest rivers in the Southeast, to its natural state. At the same time it's creating a thrill ride for kayakers and rafters who can enjoy the world's the longest urban whitewater run through the heart of downtown Columbus and neighboring Phenix City, Alabama. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
Saturday, April 25, 2015

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TV Technical Issues

TV
    TV Technical Issues
    • KQET planned overnight outage, early Friday 3/13

      (DT25-1 through 25-3) Another station on Fremont Tower needs to perform more maintenance work overnight, requiring other TV stations to shut down their signals for the safety of the workers. KQET’s signal will turn off late Thurs/early Friday between midnight and 12:30am, and should return by 6am Friday morning. Many receivers will be able to […]

    • KQET planned overnight outage, early Wed 3/11

      (DT25-1 through 25-3) Another station on Fremont Tower needs to perform maintenance work overnight, requiring that other TV stations shut down their signals for the safety of the workers. KQET’s signal will turn off late Tues/early Wednesday between midnight and 12:30am, and should return by 5am Wednesday morning. Many receivers will be able to recover […]

    • Thurs 3/05, DT54-1 thru DT54-5: 2 planned, extremely brief Over the Air outages

      (DT54.1 through DT54.5) Our Over the Air signals from our KQEH transmitter on Monument Peak (the DT54s) will need to be switched from our Main antenna to our Auxillary antenna while climbers inspect the tower for possible maintenance needs. Once the inspection is done, we will switch back. The two switches will account for two […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

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KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Channel 54.4
XFINITY 192

Quality children's programming parents love too