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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

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KQED World: Tuesday, August 30, 2016

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Tuesday, August 30, 2016
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#11642] * New Hire | Jesse Curtis Morton begins work as a counterterrorism researcher at George Washington University this fall. But his path to the position was highly unconventional: until 2012, Morton was Younus Abdullah Muhammad, a Muslim extremist who founded a radical Islamist website. His decision to go undercover and assist in counterterrorism efforts while in prison changed his trajectory profoundly.
    * Politics Monday | The traditional Labor Day launch of the presidential campaign is almost upon us. For political analysis, Gwen Ifill speaks with Amy Walter of the Cook Political Report and Stuart Rothenberg of the The Rothenberg & Gonzales Political Report.
    * NewsHour Bookshelf | "Another Brooklyn," by Jacqueline Woodson, is not a typical coming-of-age novel. It takes place in Brooklyn in the 1970s, a world where drugs, violence and crime are ubiquitous, white flight is on the rise and young girls rely on each other for support - instead of on parents. Jeffrey Brown meets with Woodson, who herself grew up in such a realm, in Brooklyn to discuss the book.
    * Chicago's Pain | Nykea Aldridge was walking her baby in a park on Chicago's South Side when she was killed in crossfire. The tragedy has sparked a conversation about rising gun violence in the city, where homicides exceed those in New York and Los Angeles combined. John Yang speaks with Chicago Life's Rev. Jedidiah Brown and Lori Lightfoot, president of the Chicago Police Board, for more on the crisis.
    * Epi Battle | After news broke that the price of EpiPen injectors has skyrocketed, the allergy medicine's maker, Mylan, announced its intention to offer a generic version of the product, to be sold at half the market price of the original. Gwen Ifill speaks with The New York Times' Andrew Pollack and Stephen Schondelmeyer of the University of Minnesota about whether public outcry influenced the decision.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#35172] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#3881] Tavis talks with athlete Rahsaan Bahati about his unlikely path to becoming a world-class cyclist, and singer and musician Lianne La Havas performs from her Grammy-nominated album Blood. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    JFK & LBJ: A Time for Greatness (A "Secrets of the Dead" Special) President LBJ is chiefly remembered for the Vietnam War. But 50 years ago, he engineered two of the most important laws Congress ever passed, the 1964 Civil Rights Act and the 1965 Voting Rights Act. This special examines how LBJ transformed America. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Global 3000 [#835] Brain Training for Babies duration 26:00   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:30 am
    Focus On Europe [#3435] Ongoing Plight of Refugees In response to the influx of hundreds of thousands of refugees to Europe, in August of 2015 Chancellor Angela Merkel declared: "We can do it!" So how do things look now, 12 months later? duration 26:10   STEREO TVG
  • 4:00 am
    Newsroom Tokyo [#294] duration 45:00   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:45 am
    Direct Talk [#57] DIRECT TALK is an in-depth interview program featuring business executives or persons in the news who share their insights, information and analysis. duration 12:00   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    Jimmy Carter: American Experience [#2306] This film traces the ascent of an ambitious country boy from a peanut farm in Plains, Georgia, to the Oval Office; it examines the failings of Jimmy Carter's political leadership in the context of the turbulent 1970s; and explores the role religion played in his career. Carter ran for president as an outsider. He rode into power on the post-Watergate disaffection with Washington politics. But his inexperience resulted in an ineffectual and fractured administration. Inflation, recession, and a humbling hostage crisis blew his presidency dramatically off course. The crowning achievement of his one-term in office, the Camp David Accords, which established a framework for peace in the Middle East, was the inspiration for his life after the White House. In the years since, Carter has recast himself as a giant of moral leadership. He has struggled to bring peace to war-torn countries; fought for the eradication of life-threatening diseases; and dedicated himself to housing America's poorest citizens. The film features interviews with many close to the Carter administration including his wife Rosalynn, son Chip, Press Secretary Jody Powell and Vice President Walter Mondale. duration 1:56:46   STEREO TVPG-L (Secondary audio: none)
  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
    Ball of Confusion: The 1968 Election Has there ever been a year like 1968? Assassinations, racial unrest, nationwide riots, and an endless war in Vietnam put the nation on edge and produced a historic three-way presidential election where all the candidates were deeply flawed. Backed into a corner by rising casualties in Vietnam and with no easy exit strategy, President Johnson stunned the nation in March 1968 when he announced he would not seek a second full term in the White House. As his efforts to secure a compromise peace proved futile, LBJ's popularity plummeted further. Even darker hours came when Martin Luther King, Jr. and Robert F. Kennedy were cut down by assassins' bullets. Race riots and anti-war protests erupted in hundreds of cities across the country and the world. The hostilities and bitterness spilled over onto the floor of the Democratic National Convention in Chicago where massive demonstrations and an unforgiving police response nearly tore the party apart. The American voters faced an unwelcome but unavoidable dilemma: Could they right America's course, especially with an unsatisfying set of choices in the November election for the White House? Republican Richard Nixon, Democrat Hubert Humphrey, and Independent George Wallace were at the eye of the storm, and in some ways contributed to the intensity of the tempest. The world watched as a fractured electorate narrowly and without evident enthusiasm chose Nixon. In BALL OF CONFUSION, the story of 1968 and the presidential election are told through interviews with Larry J. Sabato, Ted Koppel, Skip Humphrey, Walter Mondale, Mark Updegrove, Fred Malek, George Wallace Jr., and Peggy Wallace, among others. duration 56:22   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:00 am
    JFK & LBJ: A Time for Greatness (A "Secrets of the Dead" Special) President LBJ is chiefly remembered for the Vietnam War. But 50 years ago, he engineered two of the most important laws Congress ever passed, the 1964 Civil Rights Act and the 1965 Voting Rights Act. This special examines how LBJ transformed America. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:00 am
    Tavis Smiley [#3882] Tavis talks with actor, comedian and writer Jerrod Carmichael about his sitcom The Carmichael Show. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#3881] Tavis talks with athlete Rahsaan Bahati about his unlikely path to becoming a world-class cyclist, and singer and musician Lianne La Havas performs from her Grammy-nominated album Blood. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:00 am
    Global 3000 [#835] Brain Training for Babies duration 26:00   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:30 am
    Focus On Europe [#3435] Ongoing Plight of Refugees In response to the influx of hundreds of thousands of refugees to Europe, in August of 2015 Chancellor Angela Merkel declared: "We can do it!" So how do things look now, 12 months later? duration 26:10   STEREO TVG
  • 11:00 am
    Jimmy Carter: American Experience [#2306] This film traces the ascent of an ambitious country boy from a peanut farm in Plains, Georgia, to the Oval Office; it examines the failings of Jimmy Carter's political leadership in the context of the turbulent 1970s; and explores the role religion played in his career. Carter ran for president as an outsider. He rode into power on the post-Watergate disaffection with Washington politics. But his inexperience resulted in an ineffectual and fractured administration. Inflation, recession, and a humbling hostage crisis blew his presidency dramatically off course. The crowning achievement of his one-term in office, the Camp David Accords, which established a framework for peace in the Middle East, was the inspiration for his life after the White House. In the years since, Carter has recast himself as a giant of moral leadership. He has struggled to bring peace to war-torn countries; fought for the eradication of life-threatening diseases; and dedicated himself to housing America's poorest citizens. The film features interviews with many close to the Carter administration including his wife Rosalynn, son Chip, Press Secretary Jody Powell and Vice President Walter Mondale. duration 1:56:46   STEREO TVPG-L (Secondary audio: none)
  • AFTERNOON
  • 1:00 pm
    Ball of Confusion: The 1968 Election Has there ever been a year like 1968? Assassinations, racial unrest, nationwide riots, and an endless war in Vietnam put the nation on edge and produced a historic three-way presidential election where all the candidates were deeply flawed. Backed into a corner by rising casualties in Vietnam and with no easy exit strategy, President Johnson stunned the nation in March 1968 when he announced he would not seek a second full term in the White House. As his efforts to secure a compromise peace proved futile, LBJ's popularity plummeted further. Even darker hours came when Martin Luther King, Jr. and Robert F. Kennedy were cut down by assassins' bullets. Race riots and anti-war protests erupted in hundreds of cities across the country and the world. The hostilities and bitterness spilled over onto the floor of the Democratic National Convention in Chicago where massive demonstrations and an unforgiving police response nearly tore the party apart. The American voters faced an unwelcome but unavoidable dilemma: Could they right America's course, especially with an unsatisfying set of choices in the November election for the White House? Republican Richard Nixon, Democrat Hubert Humphrey, and Independent George Wallace were at the eye of the storm, and in some ways contributed to the intensity of the tempest. The world watched as a fractured electorate narrowly and without evident enthusiasm chose Nixon. In BALL OF CONFUSION, the story of 1968 and the presidential election are told through interviews with Larry J. Sabato, Ted Koppel, Skip Humphrey, Walter Mondale, Mark Updegrove, Fred Malek, George Wallace Jr., and Peggy Wallace, among others. duration 56:22   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 pm
    Newsline [#7108] duration 28:03   STEREO TVRE
  • 2:30 pm
    DW News [#13173] duration 28:10   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 pm
    Tavis Smiley [#3882] Tavis talks with actor, comedian and writer Jerrod Carmichael about his sitcom The Carmichael Show. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:30 pm
    Nightly Business Report [#35173] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#11643] * iTax | After uncovering an illegal deal, the European Union ruled that Apple pay over $14.5 billion in back taxes to Ireland. The EU's antitrust regulator found that the country and the tech giant had made an agreement that allowed Apple to pay less than 1% in corporate tax for over a decade. Apple plans to appeal the decision. Gwen Ifill speaks with the European Commission's Margrethe Vestager.
    * No End In Sight | Documenting atrocities committed by the Islamic State can seem impossible. A new report from the Associated Press, however, catalogs 72 mass graves around Syria and Iraq - including one city that held 1700 bodies. Gwen Ifill speaks with the AP's Lori Hinnant about the locations of these burial sites, what happened to the victims entombed within them and whether anyone is being held responsible.
    * Teaching The Teachers | Teaching is extremely difficult in urban school districts. In Chicago, for example, the city is confronting one of the worst budget crises in years, and keeping good teachers is a persistent struggle. But an intensive training program nearby is using innovative techniques that anticipate the challenges teachers will face in such demanding, diverse classrooms. Education Week's Lisa Stark reports.
    * Vote 2016 | Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton have very different ground strategies when it comes to key swing states. While Clinton has put countless resources into creating campaign offices and on-the-ground personnel support, Donald Trump has defied convention, putting very little into these endeavors. Hari Sreenivasan speaks with Lisa Desjardins, who co-authored a report on the subject with Daniel Bush. * Destination Iceland | As war, terrorism and uncertainty pervade the globe, travelers are flocking to Iceland -- regarded as one of the safest nations on the planet. Fishing used to be the country's most profitable industry, but in recent years, tourism has claimed the top spot. Still, the buzz and the economic benefits it delivers are accompanied by challenges. Malcolm Brabant reports Iceland's tourism 'growing pains.'
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 pm
    Nightly Business Report [#35173] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:30 pm
    Democracy Now! [#6027] duration 59:00   TVRE
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Newsline [#7108] duration 28:03   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#4197H] duration 1:00  
  • 7:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#11643] * iTax | After uncovering an illegal deal, the European Union ruled that Apple pay over $14.5 billion in back taxes to Ireland. The EU's antitrust regulator found that the country and the tech giant had made an agreement that allowed Apple to pay less than 1% in corporate tax for over a decade. Apple plans to appeal the decision. Gwen Ifill speaks with the European Commission's Margrethe Vestager.
    * No End In Sight | Documenting atrocities committed by the Islamic State can seem impossible. A new report from the Associated Press, however, catalogs 72 mass graves around Syria and Iraq - including one city that held 1700 bodies. Gwen Ifill speaks with the AP's Lori Hinnant about the locations of these burial sites, what happened to the victims entombed within them and whether anyone is being held responsible.
    * Teaching The Teachers | Teaching is extremely difficult in urban school districts. In Chicago, for example, the city is confronting one of the worst budget crises in years, and keeping good teachers is a persistent struggle. But an intensive training program nearby is using innovative techniques that anticipate the challenges teachers will face in such demanding, diverse classrooms. Education Week's Lisa Stark reports.
    * Vote 2016 | Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton have very different ground strategies when it comes to key swing states. While Clinton has put countless resources into creating campaign offices and on-the-ground personnel support, Donald Trump has defied convention, putting very little into these endeavors. Hari Sreenivasan speaks with Lisa Desjardins, who co-authored a report on the subject with Daniel Bush. * Destination Iceland | As war, terrorism and uncertainty pervade the globe, travelers are flocking to Iceland -- regarded as one of the safest nations on the planet. Fishing used to be the country's most profitable industry, but in recent years, tourism has claimed the top spot. Still, the buzz and the economic benefits it delivers are accompanied by challenges. Malcolm Brabant reports Iceland's tourism 'growing pains.'
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:57 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#4197H] duration 1:00  
  • 8:00 pm
    Charlie Rose [#22182] (original broadcast date: 8/30/16)
    a rebroadcast of Charlie's conversation with Rem Koolhaas, the architect behind the CCTV building in China and Casa da Musica in Portugal.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 8:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#4197H] duration 1:00  
  • 9:00 pm
    Tavis Smiley [#3883] Tavis talks with legendary television producer Norman Lear about the definitive chronicle documentary of his life, work, and achievements, Norman Lear: Just Another Version of You. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:28 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#4197H] duration 1:00  
  • 9:30 pm
    Roadtrip Nation [#1201H] Whirlwind of Awesomeness The keys to the Green RV go to three new road-trippers, all interested in design, who kick-start their cross-country journey of self-discovery with a visit to the art-tech spectacle of Two Bit Circus, where founders Brent Bushnell and Eric Gradman share their story of dabbling across domains and finding inspiration at the intersection of their interests. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#4197H] duration 1:00  
  • 10:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#11643] * iTax | After uncovering an illegal deal, the European Union ruled that Apple pay over $14.5 billion in back taxes to Ireland. The EU's antitrust regulator found that the country and the tech giant had made an agreement that allowed Apple to pay less than 1% in corporate tax for over a decade. Apple plans to appeal the decision. Gwen Ifill speaks with the European Commission's Margrethe Vestager.
    * No End In Sight | Documenting atrocities committed by the Islamic State can seem impossible. A new report from the Associated Press, however, catalogs 72 mass graves around Syria and Iraq - including one city that held 1700 bodies. Gwen Ifill speaks with the AP's Lori Hinnant about the locations of these burial sites, what happened to the victims entombed within them and whether anyone is being held responsible.
    * Teaching The Teachers | Teaching is extremely difficult in urban school districts. In Chicago, for example, the city is confronting one of the worst budget crises in years, and keeping good teachers is a persistent struggle. But an intensive training program nearby is using innovative techniques that anticipate the challenges teachers will face in such demanding, diverse classrooms. Education Week's Lisa Stark reports.
    * Vote 2016 | Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton have very different ground strategies when it comes to key swing states. While Clinton has put countless resources into creating campaign offices and on-the-ground personnel support, Donald Trump has defied convention, putting very little into these endeavors. Hari Sreenivasan speaks with Lisa Desjardins, who co-authored a report on the subject with Daniel Bush. * Destination Iceland | As war, terrorism and uncertainty pervade the globe, travelers are flocking to Iceland -- regarded as one of the safest nations on the planet. Fishing used to be the country's most profitable industry, but in recent years, tourism has claimed the top spot. Still, the buzz and the economic benefits it delivers are accompanied by challenges. Malcolm Brabant reports Iceland's tourism 'growing pains.'
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:57 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#4197H] duration 1:00  
  • 11:00 pm
    Democracy Now! [#6027] duration 59:00   TVRE
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#11643] * iTax | After uncovering an illegal deal, the European Union ruled that Apple pay over $14.5 billion in back taxes to Ireland. The EU's antitrust regulator found that the country and the tech giant had made an agreement that allowed Apple to pay less than 1% in corporate tax for over a decade. Apple plans to appeal the decision. Gwen Ifill speaks with the European Commission's Margrethe Vestager.
    * No End In Sight | Documenting atrocities committed by the Islamic State can seem impossible. A new report from the Associated Press, however, catalogs 72 mass graves around Syria and Iraq - including one city that held 1700 bodies. Gwen Ifill speaks with the AP's Lori Hinnant about the locations of these burial sites, what happened to the victims entombed within them and whether anyone is being held responsible.
    * Teaching The Teachers | Teaching is extremely difficult in urban school districts. In Chicago, for example, the city is confronting one of the worst budget crises in years, and keeping good teachers is a persistent struggle. But an intensive training program nearby is using innovative techniques that anticipate the challenges teachers will face in such demanding, diverse classrooms. Education Week's Lisa Stark reports.
    * Vote 2016 | Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton have very different ground strategies when it comes to key swing states. While Clinton has put countless resources into creating campaign offices and on-the-ground personnel support, Donald Trump has defied convention, putting very little into these endeavors. Hari Sreenivasan speaks with Lisa Desjardins, who co-authored a report on the subject with Daniel Bush. * Destination Iceland | As war, terrorism and uncertainty pervade the globe, travelers are flocking to Iceland -- regarded as one of the safest nations on the planet. Fishing used to be the country's most profitable industry, but in recent years, tourism has claimed the top spot. Still, the buzz and the economic benefits it delivers are accompanied by challenges. Malcolm Brabant reports Iceland's tourism 'growing pains.'
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
Tuesday, August 30, 2016

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TV Technical Issues

TV
    TV Technical Issues
    • Mon 8/01: DT9 Over the Air PSIP outage (apx 8:30am-2:30pm)

      RESOLVED: PSIP was restored at apx 2:30pm Monday. Our signal should be ID’g as 9-1, 9-2 & 9-3 again. – – – – – (DT9-1, 9-2 & 9-3) BACKGROUND: the PSIP information line in our Over the Air signal stopped again this morning. So while we were still transmitting programming on our three channels, they […]

    • Mon 6/27: DT9 PSIP issue for Over the Air viewers

      RESOLVED: PSIP was restored at apx 2:50pm Monday. Our signal should be ID’g as 9.1, 9.2 & 9.3 again. – – – – – (DT9.1, 9.2 & 9.3) Our Over the Air (OTA) signal for DT9 is still transmitting. However, we are aware that the PSIP information line in our OTA signal has stopped. Engineers […]

    • Mon 6/13: RESOLVED – KQED Plus (KQEH) Transmitter Off the Air (DT54.1 through 54.5)

      UPDATE: The signal was restored apx 5pm Monday. Most TVs will have recovered the signal on their own, but some viewers may need to do a rescan in order to re-acquire the signal. – – – – – – – – – – – – Our KQEH transmitter in the San Jose area has suffered […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9, KQET

KQED 9 / KQET

Channels 9.1, 54.2, 25.1
XFINITY 9 and HD 709
Wave 9 and HD 164
DirecTV, Dish Network, AT&T U-verse: Channel # may vary, labeled as KQED, or as KQET in the 831 area code

All HD programs

KQED Plus, KQET

KQED Plus / KQET

Channels 54.1, 9.2, 25.2
XFINITY 10 and HD 710
Wave 10
DirecTV, Dish Network, AT&T U-verse: IF this channel provided to customer, channel # may vary, labeled as KQEH

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life

Channel 54.3
XFINITY 189
Wave 157

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World

Channel 9.3
XFINITY 190
Wave 156

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me

Channel 54.5 & 25.3
XFINITY 191 & 621
Wave 154

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids

Channel 54.4
XFINITY 192
Wave 155

Quality children's programming parents love too