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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Sunday, September 21, 2014

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Sunday, September 21, 2014
  • 12:00 am
    America Reframed [#218] Deputized In the aftermath of a senseless hate crime, an all-American town finds itself desperately seeking answers: What really killed Marcelo Lucero? In a deceptively peaceful Long Island town just before midnight on November 8, 2008, 37-year-old Ecuadorian immigrant Marcelo Lucero is assaulted by a group of teenaged boys cruising the streets "beaner-hopping," a term used to describe the decade-long ritual of attacking Latinos for sport. The adolescent ?game? comes to an end with the fatal stabbing of Lucero, exposing a thinly veiled systemic intolerance for immigrants. Seventeen-year-old Jeffery Conroy, a popular high school athlete, is sentenced to 25-years for a hate crime, while the other teens get 5 to 8-years behind bars. duration 1:00:17   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Voces On PBS [#101H] Tales of Masked Men This documentary explores "Lucha Libre" (Mexican wrestling) and its role in Latino communities in the United States and Mexico. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 2:00 am
    Teaching Channel Presents [#306] Teaching Ela to the Core We'll drill down into the Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts and see teachers succeed, and stumble, as they work to incorporate material that not all students are ready to handle. duration 59:00   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Moyers & Company [#337H] Climate Change: The Next Generation Kelsey Juliana comes by her activism naturally - her parents met in the 1990's while fighting the logging industry's destruction of old growth forests and she attended her first protest when she was two months old. Now a teenager, and just out of high school, she's co-plaintiff in a major lawsuit that could force the state of Oregon to take a more aggressive stance against the carbon emissions warming the earth and destroying the environment. And she's walking across the US as part of the Great March for Climate Action, due to arrive in Washington, DC, on November 1.
    As world leaders converge for the UN's global summit on climate and thousands gather in New York for the People's Climate March, Kelsey Juliana talks with Bill Moyers this week. "You don't have to call yourself an activist to act," she says. "I think that's so important that people my age really get [ that] into their heads. As a younger person, I have everything to gain from taking action and everything to lose from not. It's important that youth are the ones who are standing up because of the fact that we do have so much to lose."
    She tells Moyers, "Something that is valid and important to recognize is that climate change [can be] a selfish issue. It is totally okay to look at this from purely my own life. We don't need to only look at ecology. We can look at it as, 'Why do I care about climate change? Because I want to be able to do things. Because I want to ensure my children will be able to do things.'"
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 am
    Asia This Week [#425] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2328] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:30 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3239H] duration 27:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:00 am
    Scully/The World Show [#1719] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 5:30 am
    European Journal [#3238] Pope Francis Kicks Mafia Out Turkey: A New Home - Tens of thousands of Yazidis are fleeing Iraq due to attacks by Islamic State militants. Many are heading for Turkey, to return to villages their ethno-religious community was once forced to leave and which, until recently, lay abandoned. Large numbers of Yazidis are flocking to the village of Kiwex in southeastern Turkey. With the assistance of Germany's Yazidi community, it is hoped up to 1,000 people should be able to find new homes here. The village's former residents were once driven out by the Turkish military, and many now live in Germany. Their old houses are now falling apart, but most of the current refugees are just happy to have a roof over their heads. Otherwise they'll have to return to the refugee camps on the border with Syria and Iraq. Bulgaria: Finding Refuge in a Monastery - Bulgaria is one of the poorest countries in the EU. For over 400 days, residents of Sofia took to the streets to force the government to resign. And they succeeded; new elections will take place on October 5. There's hope this will rein in the rampant corruption and political chaos. Almost half of Bulgarians live in poverty or close to it. The St. Trinity Monastery in Novi Han has become a place of refuge for the poorest of the poor. Father Ivan, who's known across the country, runs the St. Nicholas Orphanage here. The monastery receives limited assistance from the state. People in Novi Han were suspicious of the project, as many of the children come from Roma families. But neither the threat of being shut down nor a lack of donations is keeping Father Ivan from helping the children in his care. France: Bucking the Crisis - President Francois Holland of France recently reshuffled his cabinet due to ongoing disputes within the government about the country's economic direction. The French are unhappy with their leader, unemployment is high and the grande nation's image has taken a beating. Some say that the 35-hour work week, retirement at 62 and high taxes mean that France can no longer compete internationally. Now people are calling on medium-sized businesses to stimulate the economy. In the French Basque country, an Irishman is showing them how. He says the French need to have more faith in the attractiveness of their own products. For his part, he's saved the last factory that produces traditional French berets from bankruptcy. Italy: The Church and the Mafia - Pope Francis has declared war on the Italian mafia. In June he excommunicated several members of the mafia during a church service. The mafia still enjoy control over the villages of Calabria. Precious few priests are daring to follow in the footsteps of the tough stance taken by the Pope. Among them is Giuseppe Demasi, who is determined to break the silence on the mafia's crimes. Every year he organizes summer camps for youngsters from across the country, where they learn about the brutality of the 'Ndrangheta. Denmark: A Different Kind of Dating Service - Increasingly, people are resorting to the Internet when looking for love. In Denmark there's now an online dating site specifically for singles who want to start a family. Love&Kids was founded by Emmanuel Limal, a French actor based in Copenhagen. He was looking for a woman to settle down and start a family with. Over 2,500 people registered with the site just after it went online. Limal was inspired to create Love&Kids after realizing that expressing a desire to have children was taboo on most Internet dating sites. duration 26:10   STEREO TVG
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    America Reframed [#218] Deputized In the aftermath of a senseless hate crime, an all-American town finds itself desperately seeking answers: What really killed Marcelo Lucero? In a deceptively peaceful Long Island town just before midnight on November 8, 2008, 37-year-old Ecuadorian immigrant Marcelo Lucero is assaulted by a group of teenaged boys cruising the streets "beaner-hopping," a term used to describe the decade-long ritual of attacking Latinos for sport. The adolescent ?game? comes to an end with the fatal stabbing of Lucero, exposing a thinly veiled systemic intolerance for immigrants. Seventeen-year-old Jeffery Conroy, a popular high school athlete, is sentenced to 25-years for a hate crime, while the other teens get 5 to 8-years behind bars. duration 1:00:17   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:00 am
    European Journal [#3238] Pope Francis Kicks Mafia Out Turkey: A New Home - Tens of thousands of Yazidis are fleeing Iraq due to attacks by Islamic State militants. Many are heading for Turkey, to return to villages their ethno-religious community was once forced to leave and which, until recently, lay abandoned. Large numbers of Yazidis are flocking to the village of Kiwex in southeastern Turkey. With the assistance of Germany's Yazidi community, it is hoped up to 1,000 people should be able to find new homes here. The village's former residents were once driven out by the Turkish military, and many now live in Germany. Their old houses are now falling apart, but most of the current refugees are just happy to have a roof over their heads. Otherwise they'll have to return to the refugee camps on the border with Syria and Iraq. Bulgaria: Finding Refuge in a Monastery - Bulgaria is one of the poorest countries in the EU. For over 400 days, residents of Sofia took to the streets to force the government to resign. And they succeeded; new elections will take place on October 5. There's hope this will rein in the rampant corruption and political chaos. Almost half of Bulgarians live in poverty or close to it. The St. Trinity Monastery in Novi Han has become a place of refuge for the poorest of the poor. Father Ivan, who's known across the country, runs the St. Nicholas Orphanage here. The monastery receives limited assistance from the state. People in Novi Han were suspicious of the project, as many of the children come from Roma families. But neither the threat of being shut down nor a lack of donations is keeping Father Ivan from helping the children in his care. France: Bucking the Crisis - President Francois Holland of France recently reshuffled his cabinet due to ongoing disputes within the government about the country's economic direction. The French are unhappy with their leader, unemployment is high and the grande nation's image has taken a beating. Some say that the 35-hour work week, retirement at 62 and high taxes mean that France can no longer compete internationally. Now people are calling on medium-sized businesses to stimulate the economy. In the French Basque country, an Irishman is showing them how. He says the French need to have more faith in the attractiveness of their own products. For his part, he's saved the last factory that produces traditional French berets from bankruptcy. Italy: The Church and the Mafia - Pope Francis has declared war on the Italian mafia. In June he excommunicated several members of the mafia during a church service. The mafia still enjoy control over the villages of Calabria. Precious few priests are daring to follow in the footsteps of the tough stance taken by the Pope. Among them is Giuseppe Demasi, who is determined to break the silence on the mafia's crimes. Every year he organizes summer camps for youngsters from across the country, where they learn about the brutality of the 'Ndrangheta. Denmark: A Different Kind of Dating Service - Increasingly, people are resorting to the Internet when looking for love. In Denmark there's now an online dating site specifically for singles who want to start a family. Love&Kids was founded by Emmanuel Limal, a French actor based in Copenhagen. He was looking for a woman to settle down and start a family with. Over 2,500 people registered with the site just after it went online. Limal was inspired to create Love&Kids after realizing that expressing a desire to have children was taboo on most Internet dating sites. duration 26:10   STEREO TVG
  • 7:30 am
    Hunger in the Valley of Plenty California's San Joaquin Valley is one of the most productive farm regions on the planet. Yet the people who work and live near those farms can't always access that bounty. duration 27:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 8:00 am
    Life on the Line: Coming of Age Between Nations This documentary follows a year in the life of 11 year-old Kimberly Torrez to see what it's like living between two worlds. She lives steps from the border in Nogales, Mexico and crosses over each day to attend school in Arizona. Her American father is unemployed, ill with Hepatitis C, and in need of a liver transplant, while her Mexican mother is barred from the US. The family is on the edge, but Kimberly is holding it together and soaring at a school that is used to teaching "transfronterizos" (people who cross the border daily). duration 26:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:30 am
    QUEST [#505H] Mt. Umunhum/Asteroid Hunters/Fox For more 50 years, the summit of Mt. Umunhum, looming over San Jose, has been off limits because of military and environmental contamination issues. QUEST treks 3,486 feet to the peak to find out what the public can expect when it reopens. Plus, see how scientists are tracking thousands of objects orbiting near Earth, and discover the tree-climbing North American Gray Fox at the Lindsay Wildlife Museum. duration 26:20   STEREO TVG
  • 9:00 am
    Start Up [#203] Rotelle Me More: Alley Cats/Zaza's Gary and the crew travel to Minneapolis, MN to meet with Roger, one of the owners of Alley Cats, a bike shop that sells, repairs and restores bicycles. Then they swing by Iowa City, IA to talk to Julie who created ZaZa's, a Italian specialty market that makes fresh homemade pasta. duration 26:41   STEREO TVG
  • 9:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1113H] Alternative Investments Worried about the stock and bond markets? Are alternative investments the solution? On this week's Consuelo Mack WealthTrack, Lipper's Robert Jenkins and Altegris Advisors' Lara Magnusen discuss alternatives' risks and rewards. Guests: Robert Jenkins, Global Head of Research, Lipper; Lara Magnusen, Director of Investment Products, Altegris Advisors. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 10:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3239H] duration 27:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    Hunger in the Valley of Plenty California's San Joaquin Valley is one of the most productive farm regions on the planet. Yet the people who work and live near those farms can't always access that bounty. duration 27:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 11:00 am
    Life on the Line: Coming of Age Between Nations This documentary follows a year in the life of 11 year-old Kimberly Torrez to see what it's like living between two worlds. She lives steps from the border in Nogales, Mexico and crosses over each day to attend school in Arizona. Her American father is unemployed, ill with Hepatitis C, and in need of a liver transplant, while her Mexican mother is barred from the US. The family is on the edge, but Kimberly is holding it together and soaring at a school that is used to teaching "transfronterizos" (people who cross the border daily). duration 26:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 11:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#337H] Climate Change: The Next Generation Kelsey Juliana comes by her activism naturally - her parents met in the 1990's while fighting the logging industry's destruction of old growth forests and she attended her first protest when she was two months old. Now a teenager, and just out of high school, she's co-plaintiff in a major lawsuit that could force the state of Oregon to take a more aggressive stance against the carbon emissions warming the earth and destroying the environment. And she's walking across the US as part of the Great March for Climate Action, due to arrive in Washington, DC, on November 1.
    As world leaders converge for the UN's global summit on climate and thousands gather in New York for the People's Climate March, Kelsey Juliana talks with Bill Moyers this week. "You don't have to call yourself an activist to act," she says. "I think that's so important that people my age really get [ that] into their heads. As a younger person, I have everything to gain from taking action and everything to lose from not. It's important that youth are the ones who are standing up because of the fact that we do have so much to lose."
    She tells Moyers, "Something that is valid and important to recognize is that climate change [can be] a selfish issue. It is totally okay to look at this from purely my own life. We don't need to only look at ecology. We can look at it as, 'Why do I care about climate change? Because I want to be able to do things. Because I want to ensure my children will be able to do things.'"
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1803] Tentatively scheduled: We talk with an anthropologist who is using forensic skills to reunite families with the bodies of immigrant relatives who died crossing the border. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:30 pm
    QUEST [#505H] Mt. Umunhum/Asteroid Hunters/Fox For more 50 years, the summit of Mt. Umunhum, looming over San Jose, has been off limits because of military and environmental contamination issues. QUEST treks 3,486 feet to the peak to find out what the public can expect when it reopens. Plus, see how scientists are tracking thousands of objects orbiting near Earth, and discover the tree-climbing North American Gray Fox at the Lindsay Wildlife Museum. duration 26:20   STEREO TVG
  • 1:00 pm
    Quest for the Lost Maya This National Geographic special explores archaeological evidence of a previously unknown Mayan society based in the Yucatan Peninsula of southern Mexico. It surveys their dramatic rise to prominence in the "pre-classic era" of the Maya from 800-700 BCE as well as new evidence of the collapse of their civilization in the 800-900s CE. duration 56:46   SRND51 TVPG
  • 2:00 pm
    Brazil with Michael Palin [#102H] Into Amazonia Palin travels on several rivers through the very heart of Amazonia. Meeting the Yanomami tribe, he talks to their spokesperson about the threats to their way of life. He visits the magnificent Manaus Opera House and samples some exotic Amazonian foods in Belem at the mouth of the Amazon. Traveling southward to the upper reaches of the Xingu River, Palin is welcomed to the Wauja tribe, one of the most colorful of all the Brazilian indigenous peoples. This leg of his journey ends in the capital, Brasilia, where he meets with rock star and political activist Dinho Ouro Preto. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 3:00 pm
    Brazil with Michael Palin [#103H] The Road to Rio On the road to Rio, Palin visits the source of Brazil's great mineral wealth - the state of Minas Gerais and its giant mines. Here, he meets some ordinary Brazilians dedicated to preserving the natural beauty of the state. Then he's off to Rio de Janeiro, host of the next Olympics and World Cup. Rio has always been a party town, but it's also blighted by drugs and gang violence. Palin learns how the authorities are hoping to bring the favelas back into the city. He also learns how to celebrate a goal like a Brazilian radio commentator and books a room in one of the city's famous "love hotels"! duration 55:18   STEREO TV14
  • 4:00 pm
    Brazil with Michael Palin [#104H] The Deep South On the final leg of his journey, Palin starts in the picture-perfect town of Parati, where he meets with Prince Joao de Braganca, heir to the defunct throne of Brazil. In Embraer and Sao Paolo, Palin meets some of Brazil's successful politicians, heads of business and TV soap stars, who all have mixed opinions on Brazil's future. After experiencing the beauty and serenity of the vast wetlands of the Pantanal, Palin ends his journey at the magnificent Iguazu falls, where he concludes that Brazil has much to offer the world as it takes its place as a potential new superpower. duration 54:32   STEREO TVPG
  • 5:00 pm
    QUEST [#505H] Mt. Umunhum/Asteroid Hunters/Fox For more 50 years, the summit of Mt. Umunhum, looming over San Jose, has been off limits because of military and environmental contamination issues. QUEST treks 3,486 feet to the peak to find out what the public can expect when it reopens. Plus, see how scientists are tracking thousands of objects orbiting near Earth, and discover the tree-climbing North American Gray Fox at the Lindsay Wildlife Museum. duration 26:20   STEREO TVG
  • 5:30 pm
    Moyers & Company [#337H] Climate Change: The Next Generation Kelsey Juliana comes by her activism naturally - her parents met in the 1990's while fighting the logging industry's destruction of old growth forests and she attended her first protest when she was two months old. Now a teenager, and just out of high school, she's co-plaintiff in a major lawsuit that could force the state of Oregon to take a more aggressive stance against the carbon emissions warming the earth and destroying the environment. And she's walking across the US as part of the Great March for Climate Action, due to arrive in Washington, DC, on November 1.
    As world leaders converge for the UN's global summit on climate and thousands gather in New York for the People's Climate March, Kelsey Juliana talks with Bill Moyers this week. "You don't have to call yourself an activist to act," she says. "I think that's so important that people my age really get [ that] into their heads. As a younger person, I have everything to gain from taking action and everything to lose from not. It's important that youth are the ones who are standing up because of the fact that we do have so much to lose."
    She tells Moyers, "Something that is valid and important to recognize is that climate change [can be] a selfish issue. It is totally okay to look at this from purely my own life. We don't need to only look at ecology. We can look at it as, 'Why do I care about climate change? Because I want to be able to do things. Because I want to ensure my children will be able to do things.'"
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour Weekend [#306H] Included: NewsHour Weekend reports from Hungary to examine the plight of the Gypsy, or Roma, people amid a slew of housing evictions by the local government - the latest chapter in a long history of strained relations between the two groups. While local officials maintain the government is working to slowly improve conditions for the ethnic minority, the Roma, on the other hand, say they've been abandoned by it. NewsHour Weekend's Stephen Fee reports from the city of Miskolc where the majority of Roma citizens live in poverty. That, and the weekend's news, online and on-air. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Life on the Line: Coming of Age Between Nations This documentary follows a year in the life of 11 year-old Kimberly Torrez to see what it's like living between two worlds. She lives steps from the border in Nogales, Mexico and crosses over each day to attend school in Arizona. Her American father is unemployed, ill with Hepatitis C, and in need of a liver transplant, while her Mexican mother is barred from the US. The family is on the edge, but Kimberly is holding it together and soaring at a school that is used to teaching "transfronterizos" (people who cross the border daily). duration 26:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:00 pm
    Global Voices [#717] Oil & Water Shot over 6 years, this documentary is the true story of 2 boys coming of age in the middle of one of the world's worst toxic disasters. Hugo fights for the survival of his Amazonian tribe, while David attempts to revolutionize the oil industry.
    When Hugo Lucitante was 10 years old, the Cofan tribe of Ecuador made a desperate decision. Fearing extinction, they sent Hugo to be educated in the US, in hopes that he would return to lead them into a better future. A decade later, Hugo returns to the Ecuadorian Amazon to meet his destiny, armed only with a high school diploma.
    David Poritz was just a 6th grader when he learned of the oil disaster in Hugo's homeland. With the blessing of his mother, David started a humanitarian aid project that led him away from his home in Amherst, Massachusetts to spend much of his youth in the Amazon.
    The two teenagers meet by chance during a shared canoe ride, and then again to tour Hugo's ancestral lands where 18 billion gallons of oil waste was dumped, leading to unexplainable rashes, childhood deformities, and ballooning cancer rates.
    While still a college student, David launches the world's first international company to certify oil as "fair-trade," meaning that it is drilled in a safer way. David's approach could be a game changer for the oil industry. Meanwhile, Hugo struggles with culture shock, the demands of learning to be a Cofan tribal leader, and also becoming a husband. Financial pressures cause him to shoulder two minimum wage jobs, even as oil prospectors push deeper into the rainforest.
    Will Hugo become the leader his tribe so desperately needs? Will David clean up one of the world's dirtiest industries? This film follows the twists and turning points in their lives to bring a powerful conclusion to the story.
    duration 56:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:00 pm
    Independent Lens [#1502] The Graduates This mini-series is a journey into the heart of American education. More than a survey of contemporary policy challenges, it is an intimate and honest exploration of how students, their families and teachers are faring in a stressed public education system, during a politically complex climate, and during an unforgiving global economy. This is a story about how Latino students are faring in our nation's public education system, but it is also a story about the American future. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG-L (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:00 pm
    180 Days: A Year Inside An American High School [#101] This program is framed by volatile national and local politics aimed at reforming this most fundamental of public institutions, but the lives at the center of 180 Days, most especially those of the five students whose stories take the viewer from the day 1 to day 180, seem at once deeply impacted by and yet profoundly separate from the "Race to the Top." duration 1:56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 11:00 pm
    Global Voices [#717] Oil & Water Shot over 6 years, this documentary is the true story of 2 boys coming of age in the middle of one of the world's worst toxic disasters. Hugo fights for the survival of his Amazonian tribe, while David attempts to revolutionize the oil industry.
    When Hugo Lucitante was 10 years old, the Cofan tribe of Ecuador made a desperate decision. Fearing extinction, they sent Hugo to be educated in the US, in hopes that he would return to lead them into a better future. A decade later, Hugo returns to the Ecuadorian Amazon to meet his destiny, armed only with a high school diploma.
    David Poritz was just a 6th grader when he learned of the oil disaster in Hugo's homeland. With the blessing of his mother, David started a humanitarian aid project that led him away from his home in Amherst, Massachusetts to spend much of his youth in the Amazon.
    The two teenagers meet by chance during a shared canoe ride, and then again to tour Hugo's ancestral lands where 18 billion gallons of oil waste was dumped, leading to unexplainable rashes, childhood deformities, and ballooning cancer rates.
    While still a college student, David launches the world's first international company to certify oil as "fair-trade," meaning that it is drilled in a safer way. David's approach could be a game changer for the oil industry. Meanwhile, Hugo struggles with culture shock, the demands of learning to be a Cofan tribal leader, and also becoming a husband. Financial pressures cause him to shoulder two minimum wage jobs, even as oil prospectors push deeper into the rainforest.
    Will Hugo become the leader his tribe so desperately needs? Will David clean up one of the world's dirtiest industries? This film follows the twists and turning points in their lives to bring a powerful conclusion to the story.
    duration 56:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:00 am
    Independent Lens [#1502] The Graduates This mini-series is a journey into the heart of American education. More than a survey of contemporary policy challenges, it is an intimate and honest exploration of how students, their families and teachers are faring in a stressed public education system, during a politically complex climate, and during an unforgiving global economy. This is a story about how Latino students are faring in our nation's public education system, but it is also a story about the American future. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG-L (Secondary audio: none)
Sunday, September 21, 2014

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TV Technical Issues

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    TV Technical Issues
    • KQET (DT25) Over the Air: Wed 8/27

      We are aware of the break-up issues for our DT25 Over the Air signal in the Monterey/Salinas area. This will also affect viewers of any cable or satellite signal provider using that transmitter as their source. Engineers are working on the problem.

    • Week of 8/25: Sutro Tower work (including KQED 9 Over the Air)

      (Affects several San Francisco TV & Radio stations, including KQED 9.1, 9.2 & 9.3) During the week of August 25, Monday through Friday, between 9am and 4pm, several TV and radio stations will be switching to their Auxiliary antennas. This is being done so that the tower crew can perform routine maintenance on the regular […]

    • KQET Off Air Sun 8/03 morning

      (DT25.1, 25.2, 25.3) KQET DT25 was off the air for a portion of Sunday morning, due to the transmitter taking a power hit. The signal has been restored. Most receivers should have re-acquired our signal once it returned, but a few Over the Air viewers may need to do a rescan in order to restore […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

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KQED 9
Comcast 9 and 709
Digital 9.1, 54.2 or 25.1

All widescreen and HD programs

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Channel 54
Comcast 10 and 710
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KQED Life
Comcast 189
Digital 54.3

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KQED World
Comcast 190
Digital 9.3

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Comcast 191 & 621
Digital 54.5 or 25.3

24-hour national Spanish-language network

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KQED Kids
Comcast 192
Digital 54.4

Quality children's programming parents love too