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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

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KQED World: Saturday, May 30, 2015

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, May 30, 2015
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#11239] duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#34107] duration 28:00   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#3514] Tavis talks with professors and co-editors Sonia Sanchez, John H. Bracey, Jr. and James Smethurst about their impressive new volume, "SOS - Calling All Black People: A Black Arts Reader." The co-editors share on their volume of writings from the Black Arts Movement of the 1960s and '70s. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Homes on the Range: The New Pioneers Homes on The Range documents the twelve-year journey of a group of passionate citizens in the Sheridan, Wyoming community who established the first grassroots effort to create a nonprofit skilled nursing facility with the Green House philosophy in the United States. duration 59:00   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1839] Tentative: Technology now allows critically ill premature infants to survive, but at what cost? duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1149] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2336] *A documentary edition discussing diversity in the Foreign Service. < br>*A look at how the service is and isn't changing with a special profile on US Ambassador Liliana Ayalde. As a Hispanic woman who has broke through the barriers, Ayalde says "it's been a fascinating career. I've had challenges, often I'm the only woman in the room. " But she says she didn't take challenges as roadblocks and now Ayalde is paying it forward, helping other women and minorities who share her passion for international affairs.
    *Asst. Secretary Linda Thomas-Greenfield is determined to see a truly diversity service . She says "we have to do a better job in the department in mentoring and supporting and encouraging officers because I think we do have a retention issue."
    *Young women and minorities who are the future leadership of the Foreign Service. Their springboard to their careers was one of two scholarship programs (The Thomas R. Pickering Foreign Affairs Fellowship and The Charles B. Rangel International Affairs) that focus on increasing diversity in race, ethnicity, geography, gender and sexual orientation.
    *A look at other programs aimed to ensure a diverse Foreign Service.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:30 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3323H] duration 27:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:00 am
    Roosevelts: An Intimate History [#103] The Fire of Life (1910-1919) Theodore Roosevelt leads a Progressive crusade that splits his own party, undertakes a deadly expedition into the South American jungle, campaigns for American entry into World War I - and pays a terrible personal price. Franklin masters wartime Washington as Assistant Secretary of the Navy, while Eleanor finds personal salvation in war work. Her discovery of Franklin's romance with another woman transforms their marriage into a largely political partnership. TR's death at 60 is almost universally mourned, but provides Franklin with a golden opportunity. duration 1:56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1839] Tentative: Technology now allows critically ill premature infants to survive, but at what cost? duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:30 am
    Charlie Rose - The Week [#245H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 8:00 am
    Global 3000 [#722] Nepal: Daunting Challenges of Earthquake Aftermath Global Numbers: Disaster Aid - The number of natural disasters and disasters triggered by human activity has tripled since the 1970s. One of the first things people in a disaster area need is a roof over their heads. The United Nations Refugee Agency, the UNHCR, wants to have more than 50,000 tents readily available in future. Storage facilities for them have already been set up in Dubai, Copenhagen and Durban. Nepal: Difficulties in Supplying Relief to the Mountains - In the aftermath of the devastating earthquake in Nepal, getting aid to people in isolated mountain villages is of prime importance and has been especially difficult to get relief supplies to people in isolated mountain villages. To do so, all vehicles available are needed. Anyone wanting to rent a car in Kathmandu has to drive relief supplies to earthquake-hit regions in return. Our reporter Manuel O zcerkes makes the trek to bring tents and sleeping mats to Bansbari, a village in the Sindhupalchok district, for a local aid organization. Global Living Room: Belize - Ivette Cob lives with her husband and four sons in Sarteneja, a village with a population of 2,000 in northeastern Belize. The village has been in existence since the time of the Mayas. Armenia: Filming to Protect Nature - With nearly 100 different landscapes and more than 7,000 species, the South Caucasus is one of the world's biodiversity hot spots. But habitats are endangered. Forests are being illegally clear cut, and intensive farming and poaching are putting that biodiversity at risk. An environmentalist who is also a documentary filmmaker wanted to change that and teach children and teenagers in particular to protect the environment. They've shot their own nature films, which have already been shown at international festivals. Zambia: Teaching via Radio - In Zambia, children who live in rural areas with their families have scarcely any chance of getting an education. For most of them even the nearest school is much too far away. In addition, they lack the money for school uniforms and books. Chikuni Radio has been bringing schooling to these children for fifteen years. It now reaches 2,000 children a year in 18 remote villages. duration 26:00   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:30 am
    Focus On Europe [#3322] Alone Against Al Qaeda Coming up this week on Focus on Europe from Deutsche Welle and MHz Networks: Turkey: Citizens want bigger voice; Denmark: Alone against Al-Qaeda; Estonia: A ticking time bomb; Greece/Germany: German couple makes reparations to Greece. duration 26:10   STEREO TVG
  • 9:00 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5446] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:30 am
    KQED NEWSROOM [#229H] Water Usage Cuts, A Brief History of the California Lawn, Looking Out for Water Waste, Tom Torlakson Interview
    Water Usage Cuts
    Next week, state mandates take effect requiring water districts to cut usage -- in some areas by as much as 36 percent. Scott Shafer talks with Paul Rogers, managing editor for KQED Science and environment writer for the San Jose Mercury News, about how these cuts might alter the state's landscape.

    A Brief History of the California Lawn
    How did a state with millions of acres of desert end up with so many lawns? The answer, in part, has to do with nostalgia. But as KQED's Rachel Berger finds out, many Californians are now looking for something new.

    Looking Out for Water Waste
    Maurice Wynn is a water waste inspector for the Santa Clara Valley Water District, but don't call him a water cop. UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism student Daniel Steiner rides along with Wynn as he responds to complaints about leaks, overwatering and broken sprinklers.

    Tom Torlakson Interview
    This year California schools could get more than $7 billion in additional funding. Scott Shafer talks to Tom Torlakson, state superintendent of public instruction, about how the money might be spent.
    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 10:00 am
    BBC Newsnight [#17149H] duration 28:18   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2412H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3323H] duration 27:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Charlie Rose - The Week [#245H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    KQED NEWSROOM [#229H] Water Usage Cuts, A Brief History of the California Lawn, Looking Out for Water Waste, Tom Torlakson Interview
    Water Usage Cuts
    Next week, state mandates take effect requiring water districts to cut usage -- in some areas by as much as 36 percent. Scott Shafer talks with Paul Rogers, managing editor for KQED Science and environment writer for the San Jose Mercury News, about how these cuts might alter the state's landscape.

    A Brief History of the California Lawn
    How did a state with millions of acres of desert end up with so many lawns? The answer, in part, has to do with nostalgia. But as KQED's Rachel Berger finds out, many Californians are now looking for something new.

    Looking Out for Water Waste
    Maurice Wynn is a water waste inspector for the Santa Clara Valley Water District, but don't call him a water cop. UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism student Daniel Steiner rides along with Wynn as he responds to complaints about leaks, overwatering and broken sprinklers.

    Tom Torlakson Interview
    This year California schools could get more than $7 billion in additional funding. Scott Shafer talks to Tom Torlakson, state superintendent of public instruction, about how the money might be spent.
    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 12:30 pm
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1839] Tentative: Technology now allows critically ill premature infants to survive, but at what cost? duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 pm
    QUEST [#708H] Bikes, Bugs and Fashionistas Go behind the scenes with a North Carolina inventor building sun-powered "carcycles;" meet an Ohio engineer transforming flies into fishmeal; and visit a Nebraska textile engineer converting corn husks into fashion. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 1:30 pm
    Global 3000 [#722] Nepal: Daunting Challenges of Earthquake Aftermath Global Numbers: Disaster Aid - The number of natural disasters and disasters triggered by human activity has tripled since the 1970s. One of the first things people in a disaster area need is a roof over their heads. The United Nations Refugee Agency, the UNHCR, wants to have more than 50,000 tents readily available in future. Storage facilities for them have already been set up in Dubai, Copenhagen and Durban. Nepal: Difficulties in Supplying Relief to the Mountains - In the aftermath of the devastating earthquake in Nepal, getting aid to people in isolated mountain villages is of prime importance and has been especially difficult to get relief supplies to people in isolated mountain villages. To do so, all vehicles available are needed. Anyone wanting to rent a car in Kathmandu has to drive relief supplies to earthquake-hit regions in return. Our reporter Manuel O zcerkes makes the trek to bring tents and sleeping mats to Bansbari, a village in the Sindhupalchok district, for a local aid organization. Global Living Room: Belize - Ivette Cob lives with her husband and four sons in Sarteneja, a village with a population of 2,000 in northeastern Belize. The village has been in existence since the time of the Mayas. Armenia: Filming to Protect Nature - With nearly 100 different landscapes and more than 7,000 species, the South Caucasus is one of the world's biodiversity hot spots. But habitats are endangered. Forests are being illegally clear cut, and intensive farming and poaching are putting that biodiversity at risk. An environmentalist who is also a documentary filmmaker wanted to change that and teach children and teenagers in particular to protect the environment. They've shot their own nature films, which have already been shown at international festivals. Zambia: Teaching via Radio - In Zambia, children who live in rural areas with their families have scarcely any chance of getting an education. For most of them even the nearest school is much too far away. In addition, they lack the money for school uniforms and books. Chikuni Radio has been bringing schooling to these children for fifteen years. It now reaches 2,000 children a year in 18 remote villages. duration 26:00   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 pm
    Homefront, The View intimate portraits of America's military families, with unprecedented access to soldiers, sailors, Marines and airmen and women in the all-volunteer military. The revealing documentary tells stories of pride and patriotism, sacrifice and resilience. duration 1:56:46   SRND51 TVPG
  • 4:00 pm
    Easy Like Water In flood-prone Bangladesh, visionary architect Mohammed Rezwan seeks to turn the front lines of climate change into a community of learning. His innovative floating boat schools - outfitted with solar-powered Internet - bring education to children, especially girls, whose schools lie underwater for 3 to 4 months of the year. This program follows "Bangladesh's Noah" as struggles to overcome both adversity and the high-pressure competition for resources to turn his vision into reality. duration 56:42   STEREO TVG
  • 5:00 pm
    Enemy of the Reich: The Noor Inayat Khan Story In August of 1943, the last surviving clandestine radio operator in Paris desperately signaled London. Everything depended on her and the Gestapo was at the door. How did a Sorbonne educated musician and author of a book of fairy tales become a daring spy who died fighting the Nazis? With an American mother and Indian Muslim father, Noor Inayat Khan was an extremely unusual British agent, and her life spent growing up in a Sufi center of learning in Paris seemed an unlikely preparation for the dangerous work to come. Yet it was in this place of universal peace and contemplation that her remarkable courage was forged. When the Nazi's invaded France, she joined Britain's Women's Auxiliary Air Force, and was recruited as spy, going to Paris to support the French Underground. For four crucial months, Noor was the only surviving radio operator in Paris, calling in the air-drop of weapons and supplies, and coordinating the rescue of downed allied fliers. She was ultimately betrayed by a French collaborator, and interrogated for months by the Gestapo. She never gave up any information, not even her real name, and she organized two breakouts from Gestapo headquarters. For this and the damage she did to the Nazis war efforts, she was executed in Dachau. 2014 marks the 100th anniversary of her birth. duration 56:46   SRND51 TVPG-V (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour Weekend [#377H] duration 24:10   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5446] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:00 pm
    KQED NEWSROOM [#229H] Water Usage Cuts, A Brief History of the California Lawn, Looking Out for Water Waste, Tom Torlakson Interview
    Water Usage Cuts
    Next week, state mandates take effect requiring water districts to cut usage -- in some areas by as much as 36 percent. Scott Shafer talks with Paul Rogers, managing editor for KQED Science and environment writer for the San Jose Mercury News, about how these cuts might alter the state's landscape.

    A Brief History of the California Lawn
    How did a state with millions of acres of desert end up with so many lawns? The answer, in part, has to do with nostalgia. But as KQED's Rachel Berger finds out, many Californians are now looking for something new.

    Looking Out for Water Waste
    Maurice Wynn is a water waste inspector for the Santa Clara Valley Water District, but don't call him a water cop. UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism student Daniel Steiner rides along with Wynn as he responds to complaints about leaks, overwatering and broken sprinklers.

    Tom Torlakson Interview
    This year California schools could get more than $7 billion in additional funding. Scott Shafer talks to Tom Torlakson, state superintendent of public instruction, about how the money might be spent.
    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 7:30 pm
    QUEST [#708H] Bikes, Bugs and Fashionistas Go behind the scenes with a North Carolina inventor building sun-powered "carcycles;" meet an Ohio engineer transforming flies into fishmeal; and visit a Nebraska textile engineer converting corn husks into fashion. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1408H] Globe Trekker Food Hour: Deep South USA Bobby Chinn samples Cajun and Creole cuisine in New Orleans and the surrounding Bayou country; discovers the local fare in Vicksburg and Natchez, MS; visits Elvis Presley's birthplace for a chat with The King's childhood buddies in Tupelo; and learns how to cook the perfect barbecue pork in Memphis after a stop at Graceland. duration 57:58   STEREO TVPG
  • 9:00 pm
    Nature [#3108] My Bionic Pet The animals of the world may increasingly need our help with big issues like preserving their habitat or species conservation. But sometimes individual animals need our help as well. Left disabled without fins, flippers, beaks, or tails because of disease, accidents, or even human cruelty, these unfortunate creatures need what amounts to a miracle if they are to survive. Luckily for them, sometimes miracles do happen. Amazing prosthetics made possible by the latest engineering and technology are able to provide just what they need, and scientists are finding that innovations created in the process are benefitting both animals and humans. We will meet these inspiring animals and the remarkable individuals whose work has helped them live their lives again. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:00 pm
    Nova [#4122H] First Man on the Moon When Neil Armstrong set foot on the moon, he won instant fame. Yet this accomplished engineer and test pilot was so determined to stay out of the limelight that few know the personal story of how his rare combination of talent, luck and experience led to his successful command of Apollo 11. Nova presents an intimate portrait of an unassuming American hero through interviews with Armstrong's family and friends. duration 55:31   STEREO TVG
  • 11:00 pm
    America Reframed [#321] Endless Abilities In the spring of 2012, four best friends drove across the country in search of adaptive sports for individuals with physical disabilities, and lived to tell the story in a feature documentary film. From rehabilitation patients to Paralympic athletes, our cameras captured the reality of broken boundaries and common goals among all who are active. We went rock climbing with the blind, played soccer with quadriplegics, and swam with those with muscular dystrophy, to name a few. Through our journey, we learned that sports really are the great equalizer, unifying people of all abilities on a level playing field. duration 1:26:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:30 am
    Local USA [#106] Defying Disabilities Three stories question the limits of any disability: the loving marriage of two intellectually-challenged individuals in New York City; a volunteer program that introduces unlikely candidates to surfing on the North Shore of Hawaii; and a blind North Carolina hiker sets out to climb the Appalachian Trail. duration 27:30   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
Saturday, May 30, 2015

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TV Technical Issues

TV
    TV Technical Issues
    • KQET planned overnight outage, early Friday 3/13

      (DT25-1 through 25-3) Another station on Fremont Tower needs to perform more maintenance work overnight, requiring other TV stations to shut down their signals for the safety of the workers. KQET’s signal will turn off late Thurs/early Friday between midnight and 12:30am, and should return by 6am Friday morning. Many receivers will be able to […]

    • KQET planned overnight outage, early Wed 3/11

      (DT25-1 through 25-3) Another station on Fremont Tower needs to perform maintenance work overnight, requiring that other TV stations shut down their signals for the safety of the workers. KQET’s signal will turn off late Tues/early Wednesday between midnight and 12:30am, and should return by 5am Wednesday morning. Many receivers will be able to recover […]

    • Thurs 3/05, DT54-1 thru DT54-5: 2 planned, extremely brief Over the Air outages

      (DT54.1 through DT54.5) Our Over the Air signals from our KQEH transmitter on Monument Peak (the DT54s) will need to be switched from our Main antenna to our Auxillary antenna while climbers inspect the tower for possible maintenance needs. Once the inspection is done, we will switch back. The two switches will account for two […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Channels 9.1, 54.2 & 25.1 - Monterey (KQET)
XFINITY 9 and HD 709

All widescreen and HD programs

KQED Plus

KQED +
Channels 54, 54.1, 9.2 & 25.2 - Monterey
XFINITY 10 and HD 710

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life
Channel 54.3
XFINITY 189

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Channel 9.3
XFINITY 190

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Channel 54.5 & 25.3
XFINITY 191 & 621

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Channel 54.4
XFINITY 192

Quality children's programming parents love too