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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

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KQED World: Wednesday, July 1, 2015

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Wednesday, July 1, 2015
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#11261] WORKING OVERTIME - On Monday night, President Obama announced his intention to raise the threshold for earning overtime pay for salaried workers to $50,440 from $23,660. Many businesses, however, have said the president's idea will backfire. Judy Woodruff talks to Labor Secretary Thomas Perez about the plan and the opposition.
    GREEK DRAMA - As of this evening, Greece is in default for the more than $1.7 billion owed the IMF. Malcolm Brabant explores how the country reached this point, and what default - and a potential exit from the Eurozone - will mean for Greece.
    IRAN NUKES - The deadline for a nuclear deal with Iran has been extended from midnight tonight, to midnight July 7. President Obama repeatedly has said he will only sign on to a deal that allows for transparent inspections of Iran's nuclear capabilities. Jeffrey Brown talks to Indira Lakshmanan of Bloomberg News about whether the extension will allow an agreement to be reached in time.
    DEADLY CORRUPTION - Angola is a country of extreme wealth, thanks to oil and diamonds. Yet, it has the highest child-mortality rate in the world. Rampant corruption accounts for a large part of this contradiction. Nicholas Kristof, an op-ed columnist for the New York Times, explores the country's disheartening situation..
    TREATING STROKES - Strokes are the fifth leading cause of death in the United States. The typical treatment for a stroke is to give patients a drug called TPA, which dissolves the clot. However, the American Heart Association is also recommending that doctors use a stent to remove the clot. Judy Woodruff talks to William Powers, the chief of neurology at North Carolina Chapel Hill, about the new recommendation, and its potential to save lives.
    JAMES TAYLOR - James Taylor recently released "Before This World," his first album of all-new material in 13 years. So far, it has been a chart-topping success. Arts and culture correspondent Jeffrey Brown talks to Taylor about being vulnerable, and finding gratitude in his life and career.
    NO PARENTS ALLOWED - America has a problem with youth sports, says author Daniel Pink, and that problem is the parents. In our NewsHour Essays series, Pink shares his solution.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#34129] duration 28:00   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#3536] Tavis talks with USC Professor David Cruz and UC Berkeley Professor Melissa Murray about the recent landmark Supreme Court rulings, and singer Dara Tucker performs a song from her album, "The Sun Season." duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Appalachians [#102] The story of Appalachia is about the struggle over land. In the 1830's, the growing nation set its sights on land that was still owned by the Indians. President Andrew Jackson, himself a son of Appalachia, ordered the removal of the Cherokee from their mountain homes and marched them to settle in what is now Oklahoma.
    Slavery and other social and economic differences were widening the gap between the American north and south. There were fewer slaves in the hilly Appalachian region than in plantations farther south, but the mountains would become a fierce Civil War battleground. Members of the same family fought for the Union and for the Confederacy. It was a time of violence and chaos, leaving scars on mountain life for years to come.
    After the Civil War, industrialization came to Appalachia. Railroads were built, forests were cut, and outside owners bought up the land. During the boom, a conflict between two timbering families, the Hatfields and the McCoys, was called a `blood feud' and turned into legend. Outsiders created the stereotype of a stupid, violent hillbilly, an image that was seriously damaging to the people of Appalachia.
    But timbering and coal mining brought jobs to the region. Through the early part of the 20th century, men left their farms for a regular wage, but they found their lives controlled by the coal companies. The United Mine Workers tried to organize, but it was resisted by the owners, often with violence. Resentments grew, and exploded in a series of devastating strikes known as the `great coal wars'.
    Through their struggles, the people of Appalachia held on to their love of land and family. Music continued to have great meaning for them, and they often adapted old, traditional ballads into songs that told the story of their lives in America.
    duration 56:42   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 am
    Newsline [#6068] duration 28:03   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#3537] Tavis talks with one of Hip-Hop's most prolific voices, Michael Render, a.k.a. Killer Mike. In part one of a two-part conversation, the prolific rapper discusses Hip-Hop music's ability to be used as a tool of protest, empowerment, and social change. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2416] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1201] Low-Cost Advantage Investors are abandoning traditional, actively managed mutual funds in favor of "passive" index funds, particularly exchanged traded funds, or ETFs. Wall Street has taken note and is offering a wide variety of ETFs to attract investment money. ETF experts Matthew Hougan, CEO of ETF.com, a leading ETF research firm, and Matthew Peron, Head of Global Equity at giant wealth management firm Northern Trust, explain when it is better to invest in ETFs versus traditional mutual funds and how to tell the difference between good and bad ETFs so viewers can make the best investment decisions. duration 27:36   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    America Reframed [#326] Before You Know It With humor and candor, thisprogram celebrates the bold and brave lives of active gay senior citizens who have witnessed unbelievable change in their lifetimes: from the Stonewall Riots and gay liberation to the HIV/AIDS pandemic and gay marriage rights. The film introduces us to Dennis, a gentle-hearted widower in his 70s who explores his sexual identity and fondness for dressing in women's clothing under the name "Dee," and becomes a resident at Rainbow Vista, a gay retirement community outside of Portland, Oregon. In Harlem, New York, we meet Ty, an impassioned activist for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) rights, who hears nothing but wedding bells once gay marriage legislation passes in New York; and, Robert, known as "The Mouth," who was born and reared in Houston, Texas. The son of a Southern Baptist preacher, Robert always knew he was a "sissy." But in Galveston, Texas, he is a feisty bar owner who presses on when his neighborhood institution is threatened.
    Born before the modern gay rights movement, Dennis, Ty and Robert have become pioneers in an unprecedented "out" generation of elders. They are also among the estimated 2.4 million LGBT Americans over the age of 55. While some gay Americans adhered to the cultural norms of earlier times, others became activists and made it their mission to live out, loud and proud. Each has faced discrimination, neglect and exclusion. This film reminds us that while LGBT elders face a specific set of issues, aging and its challenges are universal.
    duration 2:56:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
    Consider The Conversation 2: Stories About Cure, Relief, and Comfort American medicine's success has created a new problem. That is, the vast majority of patients can now expect to die in a place and in a way that most wouldn't choose if only asked. Talking about dying, which is as natural as birth, is now taboo. And, the reality is patients and families are suffering needlessly. It is a problem we never intended to create and one that must be solved, but how? 21 months in the making and entirely funded by private donations, Consider the Conversation 2: Stories about Cure, Relief, and Comfort explores the effect of American medicine's success on the patient/doctor relationship and sheds light on the important role communication plays in helping both patient and doctor navigate the murky waters of severe chronic disease. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:00 am
    Appalachians [#102] The story of Appalachia is about the struggle over land. In the 1830's, the growing nation set its sights on land that was still owned by the Indians. President Andrew Jackson, himself a son of Appalachia, ordered the removal of the Cherokee from their mountain homes and marched them to settle in what is now Oklahoma.
    Slavery and other social and economic differences were widening the gap between the American north and south. There were fewer slaves in the hilly Appalachian region than in plantations farther south, but the mountains would become a fierce Civil War battleground. Members of the same family fought for the Union and for the Confederacy. It was a time of violence and chaos, leaving scars on mountain life for years to come.
    After the Civil War, industrialization came to Appalachia. Railroads were built, forests were cut, and outside owners bought up the land. During the boom, a conflict between two timbering families, the Hatfields and the McCoys, was called a `blood feud' and turned into legend. Outsiders created the stereotype of a stupid, violent hillbilly, an image that was seriously damaging to the people of Appalachia.
    But timbering and coal mining brought jobs to the region. Through the early part of the 20th century, men left their farms for a regular wage, but they found their lives controlled by the coal companies. The United Mine Workers tried to organize, but it was resisted by the owners, often with violence. Resentments grew, and exploded in a series of devastating strikes known as the `great coal wars'.
    Through their struggles, the people of Appalachia held on to their love of land and family. Music continued to have great meaning for them, and they often adapted old, traditional ballads into songs that told the story of their lives in America.
    duration 56:42   STEREO TVG
  • 9:00 am
    Tavis Smiley [#3537] Tavis talks with one of Hip-Hop's most prolific voices, Michael Render, a.k.a. Killer Mike. In part one of a two-part conversation, the prolific rapper discusses Hip-Hop music's ability to be used as a tool of protest, empowerment, and social change. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#3536] Tavis talks with USC Professor David Cruz and UC Berkeley Professor Melissa Murray about the recent landmark Supreme Court rulings, and singer Dara Tucker performs a song from her album, "The Sun Season." duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:00 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2416] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1201] Low-Cost Advantage Investors are abandoning traditional, actively managed mutual funds in favor of "passive" index funds, particularly exchanged traded funds, or ETFs. Wall Street has taken note and is offering a wide variety of ETFs to attract investment money. ETF experts Matthew Hougan, CEO of ETF.com, a leading ETF research firm, and Matthew Peron, Head of Global Equity at giant wealth management firm Northern Trust, explain when it is better to invest in ETFs versus traditional mutual funds and how to tell the difference between good and bad ETFs so viewers can make the best investment decisions. duration 27:36   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 11:00 am
    America Reframed [#326] Before You Know It With humor and candor, thisprogram celebrates the bold and brave lives of active gay senior citizens who have witnessed unbelievable change in their lifetimes: from the Stonewall Riots and gay liberation to the HIV/AIDS pandemic and gay marriage rights. The film introduces us to Dennis, a gentle-hearted widower in his 70s who explores his sexual identity and fondness for dressing in women's clothing under the name "Dee," and becomes a resident at Rainbow Vista, a gay retirement community outside of Portland, Oregon. In Harlem, New York, we meet Ty, an impassioned activist for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) rights, who hears nothing but wedding bells once gay marriage legislation passes in New York; and, Robert, known as "The Mouth," who was born and reared in Houston, Texas. The son of a Southern Baptist preacher, Robert always knew he was a "sissy." But in Galveston, Texas, he is a feisty bar owner who presses on when his neighborhood institution is threatened.
    Born before the modern gay rights movement, Dennis, Ty and Robert have become pioneers in an unprecedented "out" generation of elders. They are also among the estimated 2.4 million LGBT Americans over the age of 55. While some gay Americans adhered to the cultural norms of earlier times, others became activists and made it their mission to live out, loud and proud. Each has faced discrimination, neglect and exclusion. This film reminds us that while LGBT elders face a specific set of issues, aging and its challenges are universal.
    duration 2:56:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • AFTERNOON
  • 1:00 pm
    Consider The Conversation 2: Stories About Cure, Relief, and Comfort American medicine's success has created a new problem. That is, the vast majority of patients can now expect to die in a place and in a way that most wouldn't choose if only asked. Talking about dying, which is as natural as birth, is now taboo. And, the reality is patients and families are suffering needlessly. It is a problem we never intended to create and one that must be solved, but how? 21 months in the making and entirely funded by private donations, Consider the Conversation 2: Stories about Cure, Relief, and Comfort explores the effect of American medicine's success on the patient/doctor relationship and sheds light on the important role communication plays in helping both patient and doctor navigate the murky waters of severe chronic disease. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 pm
    Newsline [#6068] duration 28:03   STEREO TVRE
  • 2:30 pm
    DW News [#11130] duration 28:00   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 pm
    Tavis Smiley [#3537] Tavis talks with one of Hip-Hop's most prolific voices, Michael Render, a.k.a. Killer Mike. In part one of a two-part conversation, the prolific rapper discusses Hip-Hop music's ability to be used as a tool of protest, empowerment, and social change. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:30 pm
    Nightly Business Report [#34130] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#11301] TERROR IN EGYPT - In Egypt, five simultaneous attacks by ISIS on military checkpoints have killed at least 20 Egyptian soldiers and injured 30 others. A resulting battle between militants and the army is ongoing. Judy Woodruff speaks to Yara Bayoumy of Reuters about the primary attack, and how long the current fighting may last.
    GREEK DRAMA - The scene in Greece has become one of desperation and chaos after the country defaulted on a loan to the IMF yesterday. Special correspondent Malcolm Brabant is in Athens, and he brings word of how people are coping now that money is limited, and Greece is considering leaving the EU.
    OBAMACARE - Since its passing in 2010, the Affordable Care Act has helped roughly 15 million new Americans get health insurance. Yet the act has not been without its share of controversy. It has been challenged twice in the Supreme Court, and is still widely criticized by Republican lawmakers. Judy Woodruff speaks to Secretary of Health and Human Services Sylvia Burwell about what she feels the program's greatest successes have been, and what she thinks could still be improved.
    JUDGING THE COURT - From legalizing gay marriage to supporting the Affordable Care Act, the Supreme Court has just finished up one of its most momentous terms in recent history. Jeffrey Brown speaks to Marcia Coyle of The National Law Journal, Joan Biskupic of Reuters and Amy Howe of SCOTUSblog.com on why this session featured more liberal rulings than many expected, and what big cases may be heard next year.
    SHAPING YOUNG MINDS - Research on the brain and how we think and act is influencing the way some teachers teach. Special correspondent John Tulenko of Learning Matters goes into a classroom where the instructor uses different methods to engage different parts of the brain than if students were simply listening to a lecture.
    DAWN AND DISCOVERY - In 2007, NASA launched Dawn, a probe nearly 65 feet long, to explore Ceres and Vesta, two large asteroids in the belt between Mars and Jupiter. In January, Dawn arrived at Ceres and began sending back information. Judy Woodruff talks to Jenny Marder, who visited NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory to explore Dawn's mission, about what the probe has found.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 pm
    Nightly Business Report [#34130] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:30 pm
    Democracy Now! [#4243] duration 59:00   STEREO TVRE
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Newsline [#6068] duration 28:03   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3893H] duration 1:00  
  • 7:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#11301] TERROR IN EGYPT - In Egypt, five simultaneous attacks by ISIS on military checkpoints have killed at least 20 Egyptian soldiers and injured 30 others. A resulting battle between militants and the army is ongoing. Judy Woodruff speaks to Yara Bayoumy of Reuters about the primary attack, and how long the current fighting may last.
    GREEK DRAMA - The scene in Greece has become one of desperation and chaos after the country defaulted on a loan to the IMF yesterday. Special correspondent Malcolm Brabant is in Athens, and he brings word of how people are coping now that money is limited, and Greece is considering leaving the EU.
    OBAMACARE - Since its passing in 2010, the Affordable Care Act has helped roughly 15 million new Americans get health insurance. Yet the act has not been without its share of controversy. It has been challenged twice in the Supreme Court, and is still widely criticized by Republican lawmakers. Judy Woodruff speaks to Secretary of Health and Human Services Sylvia Burwell about what she feels the program's greatest successes have been, and what she thinks could still be improved.
    JUDGING THE COURT - From legalizing gay marriage to supporting the Affordable Care Act, the Supreme Court has just finished up one of its most momentous terms in recent history. Jeffrey Brown speaks to Marcia Coyle of The National Law Journal, Joan Biskupic of Reuters and Amy Howe of SCOTUSblog.com on why this session featured more liberal rulings than many expected, and what big cases may be heard next year.
    SHAPING YOUNG MINDS - Research on the brain and how we think and act is influencing the way some teachers teach. Special correspondent John Tulenko of Learning Matters goes into a classroom where the instructor uses different methods to engage different parts of the brain than if students were simply listening to a lecture.
    DAWN AND DISCOVERY - In 2007, NASA launched Dawn, a probe nearly 65 feet long, to explore Ceres and Vesta, two large asteroids in the belt between Mars and Jupiter. In January, Dawn arrived at Ceres and began sending back information. Judy Woodruff talks to Jenny Marder, who visited NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory to explore Dawn's mission, about what the probe has found.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:57 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3893H] duration 1:00  
  • 8:00 pm
    Charlie Rose [#21138] (original broadcast: 7/1/15)
    *The Greek debt crisis with Peter Coy, economics editor of Bloomberg Businessweek, and Eric Schatzker, anchor and editor-at-large at Bloomberg television
    *Nisid Hajari, author of "Midnight's Furies: The Deadly Legacy of India's Partition" *Sylvia Burwell, secretary of health and human services, interviewed by Al Hunt
    duration 56:47   STEREO TVRE
  • 8:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3893H] duration 1:00  
  • 9:00 pm
    Tavis Smiley [#3538] Tavis talks with rapper Michael Render, a.k.a. Killer Mike about Hip-Hop culture and race in America in the conclusion of a special two-night conversation. Part two of our conversation with the influential rap artist about how Hip-Hop music can be used as a tool for political and social change. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:28 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3893H] duration 1:00  
  • 9:30 pm
    Roadtrip Nation [#1003H] The Power of Serendipity Outside of San Francisco, the team arrives at the Jelly Belly factory to meet with Elise Benstein, a food scientist who develops new Jelly Belly flavors. Elise encourages the Roadtrippers to be open to unplanned opportunity; after all, she never would have thought her job would consist of making Root Beer-flavored candy, but she loves it. From California, the crew winds east to Arizona, where they meet with Deon Clark, a nuclear engineer. Deon joined the navy as a teenager to escape the drugs and violence of his neighborhood, and stresses the importance of rejecting peer pressure. Moving onto New Mexico, the team meets two-time Pulitzer-Prize-winning journalist Paul Salopek, whose non-linear life experiences teach the Roadtrippers to embrace serendipity. duration 26:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 9:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3893H] duration 1:00  
  • 10:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#11301] TERROR IN EGYPT - In Egypt, five simultaneous attacks by ISIS on military checkpoints have killed at least 20 Egyptian soldiers and injured 30 others. A resulting battle between militants and the army is ongoing. Judy Woodruff speaks to Yara Bayoumy of Reuters about the primary attack, and how long the current fighting may last.
    GREEK DRAMA - The scene in Greece has become one of desperation and chaos after the country defaulted on a loan to the IMF yesterday. Special correspondent Malcolm Brabant is in Athens, and he brings word of how people are coping now that money is limited, and Greece is considering leaving the EU.
    OBAMACARE - Since its passing in 2010, the Affordable Care Act has helped roughly 15 million new Americans get health insurance. Yet the act has not been without its share of controversy. It has been challenged twice in the Supreme Court, and is still widely criticized by Republican lawmakers. Judy Woodruff speaks to Secretary of Health and Human Services Sylvia Burwell about what she feels the program's greatest successes have been, and what she thinks could still be improved.
    JUDGING THE COURT - From legalizing gay marriage to supporting the Affordable Care Act, the Supreme Court has just finished up one of its most momentous terms in recent history. Jeffrey Brown speaks to Marcia Coyle of The National Law Journal, Joan Biskupic of Reuters and Amy Howe of SCOTUSblog.com on why this session featured more liberal rulings than many expected, and what big cases may be heard next year.
    SHAPING YOUNG MINDS - Research on the brain and how we think and act is influencing the way some teachers teach. Special correspondent John Tulenko of Learning Matters goes into a classroom where the instructor uses different methods to engage different parts of the brain than if students were simply listening to a lecture.
    DAWN AND DISCOVERY - In 2007, NASA launched Dawn, a probe nearly 65 feet long, to explore Ceres and Vesta, two large asteroids in the belt between Mars and Jupiter. In January, Dawn arrived at Ceres and began sending back information. Judy Woodruff talks to Jenny Marder, who visited NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory to explore Dawn's mission, about what the probe has found.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:57 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3893H] duration 1:00  
  • 11:00 pm
    Democracy Now! [#4243] duration 59:00   STEREO TVRE
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#11301] TERROR IN EGYPT - In Egypt, five simultaneous attacks by ISIS on military checkpoints have killed at least 20 Egyptian soldiers and injured 30 others. A resulting battle between militants and the army is ongoing. Judy Woodruff speaks to Yara Bayoumy of Reuters about the primary attack, and how long the current fighting may last.
    GREEK DRAMA - The scene in Greece has become one of desperation and chaos after the country defaulted on a loan to the IMF yesterday. Special correspondent Malcolm Brabant is in Athens, and he brings word of how people are coping now that money is limited, and Greece is considering leaving the EU.
    OBAMACARE - Since its passing in 2010, the Affordable Care Act has helped roughly 15 million new Americans get health insurance. Yet the act has not been without its share of controversy. It has been challenged twice in the Supreme Court, and is still widely criticized by Republican lawmakers. Judy Woodruff speaks to Secretary of Health and Human Services Sylvia Burwell about what she feels the program's greatest successes have been, and what she thinks could still be improved.
    JUDGING THE COURT - From legalizing gay marriage to supporting the Affordable Care Act, the Supreme Court has just finished up one of its most momentous terms in recent history. Jeffrey Brown speaks to Marcia Coyle of The National Law Journal, Joan Biskupic of Reuters and Amy Howe of SCOTUSblog.com on why this session featured more liberal rulings than many expected, and what big cases may be heard next year.
    SHAPING YOUNG MINDS - Research on the brain and how we think and act is influencing the way some teachers teach. Special correspondent John Tulenko of Learning Matters goes into a classroom where the instructor uses different methods to engage different parts of the brain than if students were simply listening to a lecture.
    DAWN AND DISCOVERY - In 2007, NASA launched Dawn, a probe nearly 65 feet long, to explore Ceres and Vesta, two large asteroids in the belt between Mars and Jupiter. In January, Dawn arrived at Ceres and began sending back information. Judy Woodruff talks to Jenny Marder, who visited NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory to explore Dawn's mission, about what the probe has found.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
Wednesday, July 1, 2015

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TV Technical Issues

TV
    TV Technical Issues
    • KQED DT9s OTA: very brief outages Thurs 6/11/15

      (DT9.1, 9.2 and 9.3) There will be 3 very brief outages (apx. 10 seconds each) of KQED’s Over The Air (OTA) DT9 signal Thurs 6/15, between 10am and 3pm. This is to accommodate preventative maintenance and inspections at Sutro Tower. Most TVs will recover easily each time the signal is restored, but a few viewers […]

    • KQET planned overnight outage, early Friday 3/13

      (DT25-1 through 25-3) Another station on Fremont Tower needs to perform more maintenance work overnight, requiring other TV stations to shut down their signals for the safety of the workers. KQET’s signal will turn off late Thurs/early Friday between midnight and 12:30am, and should return by 6am Friday morning. Many receivers will be able to […]

    • KQET planned overnight outage, early Wed 3/11

      (DT25-1 through 25-3) Another station on Fremont Tower needs to perform maintenance work overnight, requiring that other TV stations shut down their signals for the safety of the workers. KQET’s signal will turn off late Tues/early Wednesday between midnight and 12:30am, and should return by 5am Wednesday morning. Many receivers will be able to recover […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Channels 9.1, 54.2 & 25.1 - Monterey (KQET)
XFINITY 9 and HD 709

All widescreen and HD programs

KQED Plus

KQED +
Channels 54, 54.1, 9.2 & 25.2 - Monterey
XFINITY 10 and HD 710

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life
Channel 54.3
XFINITY 189

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Channel 9.3
XFINITY 190

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Channel 54.5 & 25.3
XFINITY 191 & 621

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Channel 54.4
XFINITY 192

Quality children's programming parents love too