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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Tuesday, March 3, 2015

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Tuesday, March 3, 2015
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#11175] SPEECH CONTROVERSY - Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu addressed the American Israel Public Affairs Committee today to ease tensions over the political controversy surrounding his speech to Congress tomorrow. Gwen Ifill talks to Jeremy Ben-Ami, founder and president of J Street, and David Harris, executive director of the American Jewish Committee.
    BATTLELINES - Today, the high court heard a case about whether an independent commission in Arizona has the right to take the jurisdiction of congressional redistricting away from political parties. Jeffrey Brown discusses the case with Marcia Coyle of the National Law Journal.
    OBAMACARE CHALLENGE - On Wednesday, the Supreme Court will hear a case on whether the law prevents the federal government from subsidizing health plans in the 34 states that rely on the federal health insurance exchange. In collaboration with Kaiser Health News, special correspondent Sarah Varney reports from North Carolina on how the decision could affect health care coverage.
    POLITICS MONDAY - From Netanyahu's speech to the Supreme Court, this week in politics is looking unpredictable. To make sense of today's most important political topics, Gwen Ifill is joined by Amy Walter of the Cook Political Report and Nia-Malika Henderson of The Washington Post.
    "THE WHITES" - A new novel, titled "The Whites", tells the story of a detective's obsession with a terrible crime left unsolved. Jeffrey sits down with the book's author, Richard Price.
    NEWSHOUR SHARES - For our NewsHour Shares feature, a group of young percussionists became stars after uploading their rehearsal of "Kashmir," one of Led Zeppelin's biggest hits. It was impressive enough for Jimmy Page, the band's lead guitarist, to post it on Facebook, saying it was "too good not to share."
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#34043] duration 28:00   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#3450] Tavis talks with actress Felicity Huffman about her starring role in the new ABC drama, "American Crime." duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    In Search of Shakespeare [#103] The Duty of Poets In the third episode, Wood uncovers Shakespeare's rise to fame and fortune in Elizabethan London. Romeo and Juliet and A Midsummer Night's Dream fuel this rise, but tragedy strikes as his son Hamnet dies at the age of 11. Plunged into a mid-life crisis, he falls in love with a teenage nobleman, has a passionate affair with a mysterious married woman and is charged with assault. Meanwhile, his theatre company builds the Globe and becomes caught up in the rebellion against Queen Elizabeth. In the midst of it all, Shakespeare creates some of the greatest characters in world literature. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 3:00 am
    Newsline [#5242] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#3451] Tavis talks with President-elect of the American Bar Association Paulette Brown. She discusses the issue of implicit bias in the legal system. Tavis also talks with Rock & Roll Hall-of-Famer John Oates about his career and his CD/DVD set, Another Good Road. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 am
    Global 3000 [#709] Cuba & Us: Best Class Enemies Relations between sworn enemies Cuba and the US continue to thaw. Saudi Arabia arms itself to fight the group calling itself Islamic State and has tightened control of its borders. The Ohja family shows us their home in Kathmandu, Nepal. We'll also visit the Mata Atlantica forest in Brazil - famed for its wildlife diversity and preserved thanks to the efforts of the communities which live there. duration 26:00   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:30 am
    Focus On Europe [#3309] Jewish Communities In Crisis Denmark: Jewish Community Gripped by Uncertainty - Copenhagen's Jewish community is reeling after the recent attacks that killed a Jewish security guard at a synagogue and a film director. Many Jews are considering leaving the Country. But the chairman of the Jewish community is urging members to stay put. In 1622, Denmark became the first Scandinavian country to welcome Jewish people fleeing persecution in Spain and Portugal. Anti-Semitism has traditionally not been a problem in Denmark as it has elsewhere, with the population largely rallying around the Jewish minority during the Second World War. In 1943, 8000 Danish Jews were smuggled across the Baltic Sea to Sweden so as to save them from deportation by the German occupiers. France: Place Gabriel Peri - DW Series: Famous European Squares. Robert Menard is mayor of Beziers in the South of France. Endorsed by the far-right National Front even though he is not a member, he has wasted no time cleaning up the town. This includes a ban on satellite dishes and drying laundry on balconies. The far-right mayor is encountering resistance from various migrant associations. But he had a clear majority when he was elected a year ago, and can count on broad support for his hardline law-and-order campaign. Switzerland: Tourist Industry Tricks - Switzerland's tourist industry is hard hit by the rise of the Swiss franc against the euro. Many resorts are seeing German and Dutch guests cancelling their reservations. They're now hoping to lure them back with a range of special offers. After the Swiss Central Bank abandoned the cap on the currency's value against the euro, many ski resorts have started slashing prices to remain attractive - much to the outrage of some locals. They feel that the fact the offers don't apply to Swiss holidaymakers amounts to discrimination. But tourists from the euro-zone are delighted and snapping up the special offers. Russia: The Sofa King - Once dubbed "the sofa king of post-communist Russia," Max Ibragimov's business enterprises have made him a multimillionaire. He makes luxury furniture mainly for the Russian market. Russian president Vladimir Putin is a loyal customer and a friend. Ibragimov's first major commission was for a bed for former president Boris Yeltsin. He's since made the fittings for Putin's private airplane, while another high-profile commission was the reconstruction of the organ in the Kaliningrad cathedral. He's now a fully-fledged member of Russia's super- rich elite and a powerful man in the Russian exclave on the Baltic Sea. duration 26:10   STEREO TVG
  • 5:00 am
    American Masters [#2606] Alice Walker: Beauty In Truth Most famous for her seminal novel "The Color Purple," writer / activist Alice Walker celebrates her 70th birthday. Born February 9, 1944, into a family of sharecroppers in rural Georgia, her life unfolded during the violent racism and seismic social changes of mid-20th century America. Her mother, poverty and participation in the Civil Rights Movement were the formative influences on her consciousness, becoming the inherent themes in her writing. The first African-American woman to win a Pulitzer Prize for Literature, Walker continues to shine a light on global human rights issues. Her dramatic life is told with poetry and lyricism, and includes interviews with Steven Spielberg, Danny Glover, Quincy Jones, Howard Zinn, Gloria Steinem, Sapphire, and Walker herself. 90 minutes. duration 1:26:46   STEREO TVPG-L (Secondary audio: none)
  • MORNING
  • 6:30 am
    Lost Years of Zora Neale Hurston Writer, folklorist and anthropologist Zora Neale Hurston, a celebrated (and sometimes controversial) figure of the Harlem Renaissance, first rose to prominence with Mules and Men (1935) and cemented her reputation soon after with her 1937 masterwork, Their Eyes Were Watching God. However, few know about the woman behind this widely read and highly acclaimed novel - particularly the last 10 years of her life.
    This program delves into the writer's life, work and philosophies, concentrating on her very productive but often overlooked, final decade. Interviews with Hurston experts and colleagues, letters from Hurston, and archival photographs piece together this fascinating chapter in the life of an American literary icon.
    duration 26:48   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:00 am
    Local USA [#107] Beehive Spirits Utah is not exactly the first place you think of when talking about alcohol and liquor. But since the early days of prohibition, The Beehive State has a unique foray into distilling spirits. We retrace Utah's fight for and against alcohol with a look at the characters keeping it alive today. duration 27:25   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:30 am
    Film School Shorts [#201] Together Alone WILL (CalArts) On 9/11, a young girl wishes she could go back in time. Winner of a Student Academy Award. Directed by Eusong Lee.
    UNDER (Columbia University) A recovering drug addict and her fiance journey to a remote country cabin so she can get clean. Winner of a Student Academy Award. Written and directed by Mark Raso.
    duration 28:39   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:00 am
    In Search of Shakespeare [#103] The Duty of Poets In the third episode, Wood uncovers Shakespeare's rise to fame and fortune in Elizabethan London. Romeo and Juliet and A Midsummer Night's Dream fuel this rise, but tragedy strikes as his son Hamnet dies at the age of 11. Plunged into a mid-life crisis, he falls in love with a teenage nobleman, has a passionate affair with a mysterious married woman and is charged with assault. Meanwhile, his theatre company builds the Globe and becomes caught up in the rebellion against Queen Elizabeth. In the midst of it all, Shakespeare creates some of the greatest characters in world literature. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 9:00 am
    Tavis Smiley [#3451] Tavis talks with President-elect of the American Bar Association Paulette Brown. She discusses the issue of implicit bias in the legal system. Tavis also talks with Rock & Roll Hall-of-Famer John Oates about his career and his CD/DVD set, Another Good Road. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#3450] Tavis talks with actress Felicity Huffman about her starring role in the new ABC drama, "American Crime." duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:00 am
    Global 3000 [#709] Cuba & Us: Best Class Enemies Relations between sworn enemies Cuba and the US continue to thaw. Saudi Arabia arms itself to fight the group calling itself Islamic State and has tightened control of its borders. The Ohja family shows us their home in Kathmandu, Nepal. We'll also visit the Mata Atlantica forest in Brazil - famed for its wildlife diversity and preserved thanks to the efforts of the communities which live there. duration 26:00   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:30 am
    Focus On Europe [#3309] Jewish Communities In Crisis Denmark: Jewish Community Gripped by Uncertainty - Copenhagen's Jewish community is reeling after the recent attacks that killed a Jewish security guard at a synagogue and a film director. Many Jews are considering leaving the Country. But the chairman of the Jewish community is urging members to stay put. In 1622, Denmark became the first Scandinavian country to welcome Jewish people fleeing persecution in Spain and Portugal. Anti-Semitism has traditionally not been a problem in Denmark as it has elsewhere, with the population largely rallying around the Jewish minority during the Second World War. In 1943, 8000 Danish Jews were smuggled across the Baltic Sea to Sweden so as to save them from deportation by the German occupiers. France: Place Gabriel Peri - DW Series: Famous European Squares. Robert Menard is mayor of Beziers in the South of France. Endorsed by the far-right National Front even though he is not a member, he has wasted no time cleaning up the town. This includes a ban on satellite dishes and drying laundry on balconies. The far-right mayor is encountering resistance from various migrant associations. But he had a clear majority when he was elected a year ago, and can count on broad support for his hardline law-and-order campaign. Switzerland: Tourist Industry Tricks - Switzerland's tourist industry is hard hit by the rise of the Swiss franc against the euro. Many resorts are seeing German and Dutch guests cancelling their reservations. They're now hoping to lure them back with a range of special offers. After the Swiss Central Bank abandoned the cap on the currency's value against the euro, many ski resorts have started slashing prices to remain attractive - much to the outrage of some locals. They feel that the fact the offers don't apply to Swiss holidaymakers amounts to discrimination. But tourists from the euro-zone are delighted and snapping up the special offers. Russia: The Sofa King - Once dubbed "the sofa king of post-communist Russia," Max Ibragimov's business enterprises have made him a multimillionaire. He makes luxury furniture mainly for the Russian market. Russian president Vladimir Putin is a loyal customer and a friend. Ibragimov's first major commission was for a bed for former president Boris Yeltsin. He's since made the fittings for Putin's private airplane, while another high-profile commission was the reconstruction of the organ in the Kaliningrad cathedral. He's now a fully-fledged member of Russia's super- rich elite and a powerful man in the Russian exclave on the Baltic Sea. duration 26:10   STEREO TVG
  • 11:00 am
    American Masters [#2606] Alice Walker: Beauty In Truth Most famous for her seminal novel "The Color Purple," writer / activist Alice Walker celebrates her 70th birthday. Born February 9, 1944, into a family of sharecroppers in rural Georgia, her life unfolded during the violent racism and seismic social changes of mid-20th century America. Her mother, poverty and participation in the Civil Rights Movement were the formative influences on her consciousness, becoming the inherent themes in her writing. The first African-American woman to win a Pulitzer Prize for Literature, Walker continues to shine a light on global human rights issues. Her dramatic life is told with poetry and lyricism, and includes interviews with Steven Spielberg, Danny Glover, Quincy Jones, Howard Zinn, Gloria Steinem, Sapphire, and Walker herself. 90 minutes. duration 1:26:46   STEREO TVPG-L (Secondary audio: none)
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:30 pm
    Lost Years of Zora Neale Hurston Writer, folklorist and anthropologist Zora Neale Hurston, a celebrated (and sometimes controversial) figure of the Harlem Renaissance, first rose to prominence with Mules and Men (1935) and cemented her reputation soon after with her 1937 masterwork, Their Eyes Were Watching God. However, few know about the woman behind this widely read and highly acclaimed novel - particularly the last 10 years of her life.
    This program delves into the writer's life, work and philosophies, concentrating on her very productive but often overlooked, final decade. Interviews with Hurston experts and colleagues, letters from Hurston, and archival photographs piece together this fascinating chapter in the life of an American literary icon.
    duration 26:48   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 pm
    Local USA [#107] Beehive Spirits Utah is not exactly the first place you think of when talking about alcohol and liquor. But since the early days of prohibition, The Beehive State has a unique foray into distilling spirits. We retrace Utah's fight for and against alcohol with a look at the characters keeping it alive today. duration 27:25   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 pm
    Film School Shorts [#201] Together Alone WILL (CalArts) On 9/11, a young girl wishes she could go back in time. Winner of a Student Academy Award. Directed by Eusong Lee.
    UNDER (Columbia University) A recovering drug addict and her fiance journey to a remote country cabin so she can get clean. Winner of a Student Academy Award. Written and directed by Mark Raso.
    duration 28:39   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 pm
    Newsline [#5242] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 2:30 pm
    Journal [#11044] duration 28:10   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 pm
    Tavis Smiley [#3451] Tavis talks with President-elect of the American Bar Association Paulette Brown. She discusses the issue of implicit bias in the legal system. Tavis also talks with Rock & Roll Hall-of-Famer John Oates about his career and his CD/DVD set, Another Good Road. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:30 pm
    Nightly Business Report [#34044] duration 28:00   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#11176] SPEECH CONTROVERSY - In his address to Congress today, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu warned the U.S. against striking any nuclear deal with Iran. For a full analysis of the prime minister's speech, Gwen Ifill is joined by Stephen Hadley, former national security advisor to President George W. Bush and chairman of the board of directors at the U.S. Institute for Peace, and Vali Nasr, a former State Department official and current dean of the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies.
    FUNDING DEAL - Congress has sent President Obama a bill to fund the Department of Homeland Security through the end of the budget year, without overturning the president's immigration policies. Judy Woodruff debriefs with PBS NewsHour political editor Lisa Desjardins.
    FERGUSON FALLOUT - The U.S. Department of Justice will release a report this week based on the findings of their months-long investigation into the police department involved in the fatal shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri. Law enforcement officials familiar with the report say it will allege a pattern of racial bias and civil rights abuses by the Ferguson police department. Gwen Ifill discusses the findings with Paul Butler, a professor of criminal law, race relations law and critical theory at Georgetown University, and Justin Hansford, an assistant professor at the Center for Interdisciplinary Study of Law and Advocacy at St. Louis University Law School.
    CAMPUS ASSAULT - A new documentary, "The Hunting Ground," follows the stories of victims of sexual violence at colleges and universities across the country. Jeffrey Brown has the story.
    BREAKTHROUGHS - PBS NewsHour offers a second look at special correspondent Cat Wise's report on a Seattle non-profit trying to combat routine diseases in developing countries. This story originally aired as part of our series "Breakthroughs," reporting on inventions and innovations at home and abroad.
    PEACE CORPs - The White House announced a new initiative today to increase the educational opportunities for girls around the world. Jeffrey Brown speaks to Peace Corps director Carrie Hessler-Radelet about the initiative.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 pm
    Nightly Business Report [#34044] duration 28:00   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:30 pm
    Democracy Now! [#4157] duration 59:00   STEREO TVRE
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Newsline [#5242] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3807H] duration 1:00  
  • 7:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#11176] SPEECH CONTROVERSY - In his address to Congress today, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu warned the U.S. against striking any nuclear deal with Iran. For a full analysis of the prime minister's speech, Gwen Ifill is joined by Stephen Hadley, former national security advisor to President George W. Bush and chairman of the board of directors at the U.S. Institute for Peace, and Vali Nasr, a former State Department official and current dean of the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies.
    FUNDING DEAL - Congress has sent President Obama a bill to fund the Department of Homeland Security through the end of the budget year, without overturning the president's immigration policies. Judy Woodruff debriefs with PBS NewsHour political editor Lisa Desjardins.
    FERGUSON FALLOUT - The U.S. Department of Justice will release a report this week based on the findings of their months-long investigation into the police department involved in the fatal shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri. Law enforcement officials familiar with the report say it will allege a pattern of racial bias and civil rights abuses by the Ferguson police department. Gwen Ifill discusses the findings with Paul Butler, a professor of criminal law, race relations law and critical theory at Georgetown University, and Justin Hansford, an assistant professor at the Center for Interdisciplinary Study of Law and Advocacy at St. Louis University Law School.
    CAMPUS ASSAULT - A new documentary, "The Hunting Ground," follows the stories of victims of sexual violence at colleges and universities across the country. Jeffrey Brown has the story.
    BREAKTHROUGHS - PBS NewsHour offers a second look at special correspondent Cat Wise's report on a Seattle non-profit trying to combat routine diseases in developing countries. This story originally aired as part of our series "Breakthroughs," reporting on inventions and innovations at home and abroad.
    PEACE CORPs - The White House announced a new initiative today to increase the educational opportunities for girls around the world. Jeffrey Brown speaks to Peace Corps director Carrie Hessler-Radelet about the initiative.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:57 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3807H] duration 1:00  
  • 8:00 pm
    Charlie Rose [#21052] (original broadcast: 3/3/15)
    *Tom Friedman analyzes the impact of Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu's speech to Congress
    *Deputy National Security Advisor for Strategic Communication, Ben Rhodes, interviewed by guest host Jeff Goldberg
    *Tamara Cofman Wittes, director of the Brookings Institution Center for Middle East Policy, and Ray Takeyh, senior fellow for Middle Eastern Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations, interviewed by guest host Jeff Goldberg
    duration 56:47   STEREO TVRE
  • 8:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3807H] duration 1:00  
  • 9:00 pm
    Tavis Smiley [#3452] Tavis talks with actress Rosamund Pike about her Oscar nominated role in Gone Girl, and Grammy Award winning rapper Lupe Fiasco about his new album, "Tetsuo & Youth." duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:28 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3807H] duration 1:00  
  • 9:30 pm
    Roadtrip Nation [#705H] Team "Tabula Rasa" winds up their Roadtrip with a series of final interviews. In Asheville, North Carolina, Kitty Love, tattoo artist, talks about the unusual path that led her to become an Arts activist and community organizer. On their way to Philadelphia, they have a conversation with The Knux, hip-hop artists, performing at the All Points West Music & Arts Festival in New Jersey. Their final interview is with Daniela Romero, ESL Coordinator at the Nationalities Service Center. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3807H] duration 1:00  
  • 10:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#11176] SPEECH CONTROVERSY - In his address to Congress today, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu warned the U.S. against striking any nuclear deal with Iran. For a full analysis of the prime minister's speech, Gwen Ifill is joined by Stephen Hadley, former national security advisor to President George W. Bush and chairman of the board of directors at the U.S. Institute for Peace, and Vali Nasr, a former State Department official and current dean of the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies.
    FUNDING DEAL - Congress has sent President Obama a bill to fund the Department of Homeland Security through the end of the budget year, without overturning the president's immigration policies. Judy Woodruff debriefs with PBS NewsHour political editor Lisa Desjardins.
    FERGUSON FALLOUT - The U.S. Department of Justice will release a report this week based on the findings of their months-long investigation into the police department involved in the fatal shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri. Law enforcement officials familiar with the report say it will allege a pattern of racial bias and civil rights abuses by the Ferguson police department. Gwen Ifill discusses the findings with Paul Butler, a professor of criminal law, race relations law and critical theory at Georgetown University, and Justin Hansford, an assistant professor at the Center for Interdisciplinary Study of Law and Advocacy at St. Louis University Law School.
    CAMPUS ASSAULT - A new documentary, "The Hunting Ground," follows the stories of victims of sexual violence at colleges and universities across the country. Jeffrey Brown has the story.
    BREAKTHROUGHS - PBS NewsHour offers a second look at special correspondent Cat Wise's report on a Seattle non-profit trying to combat routine diseases in developing countries. This story originally aired as part of our series "Breakthroughs," reporting on inventions and innovations at home and abroad.
    PEACE CORPs - The White House announced a new initiative today to increase the educational opportunities for girls around the world. Jeffrey Brown speaks to Peace Corps director Carrie Hessler-Radelet about the initiative.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:57 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3807H] duration 1:00  
  • 11:00 pm
    Democracy Now! [#4157] duration 59:00   STEREO TVRE
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#11176] SPEECH CONTROVERSY - In his address to Congress today, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu warned the U.S. against striking any nuclear deal with Iran. For a full analysis of the prime minister's speech, Gwen Ifill is joined by Stephen Hadley, former national security advisor to President George W. Bush and chairman of the board of directors at the U.S. Institute for Peace, and Vali Nasr, a former State Department official and current dean of the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies.
    FUNDING DEAL - Congress has sent President Obama a bill to fund the Department of Homeland Security through the end of the budget year, without overturning the president's immigration policies. Judy Woodruff debriefs with PBS NewsHour political editor Lisa Desjardins.
    FERGUSON FALLOUT - The U.S. Department of Justice will release a report this week based on the findings of their months-long investigation into the police department involved in the fatal shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri. Law enforcement officials familiar with the report say it will allege a pattern of racial bias and civil rights abuses by the Ferguson police department. Gwen Ifill discusses the findings with Paul Butler, a professor of criminal law, race relations law and critical theory at Georgetown University, and Justin Hansford, an assistant professor at the Center for Interdisciplinary Study of Law and Advocacy at St. Louis University Law School.
    CAMPUS ASSAULT - A new documentary, "The Hunting Ground," follows the stories of victims of sexual violence at colleges and universities across the country. Jeffrey Brown has the story.
    BREAKTHROUGHS - PBS NewsHour offers a second look at special correspondent Cat Wise's report on a Seattle non-profit trying to combat routine diseases in developing countries. This story originally aired as part of our series "Breakthroughs," reporting on inventions and innovations at home and abroad.
    PEACE CORPs - The White House announced a new initiative today to increase the educational opportunities for girls around the world. Jeffrey Brown speaks to Peace Corps director Carrie Hessler-Radelet about the initiative.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
Tuesday, March 3, 2015

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TV Technical Issues

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    TV Technical Issues
    • Thurs 3/05, DT54-1 thru DT54-5: 2 planned, extremely brief Over the Air outages

      (DT54.1 through DT54.5) Our Over the Air signals from our KQEH transmitter on Monument Peak (the DT54s) will need to be switched from our Main antenna to our Auxillary antenna while climbers inspect the tower for possible maintenance needs. Once the inspection is done, we will switch back. The two switches will account for two […]

    • KQED Plus on 710 currently dark on Comcast/Xfinity

      We are aware that Comcast/Xfinity is currently not transmitting KQED Plus in HD on channel 710. KQED Plus is airing in SD on channel 10. Comcast is also aware of the issue, and working on fixing it. Thank you for your patience.

    • 3 channels currently dark via Comcast/Xfinity

      We are aware that Comcast/Xfinity is currently not transmitting KQED Plus on channel 10, KQED V-Me on channel 191, or KQED Kids on channel 192. Comcast is also aware of the issue, and working on fixing it. Thank you for your patience.

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Channels 9.1, 54.2 & 25.1 - Monterey (KQET)
XFINITY 9 and HD 709

All widescreen and HD programs

KQED Plus

KQED +
Channels 54, 54.1, 9.2 & 25.2 - Monterey
XFINITY 10 and HD 710

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life
Channel 54.3
XFINITY 189

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Channel 9.3
XFINITY 190

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Channel 54.5 & 25.3
XFINITY 191 & 621

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Channel 54.4
XFINITY 192

Quality children's programming parents love too