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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Friday, February 28, 2014

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Friday, February 28, 2014
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Organic Soybean Shortage American farmers can't -- or won't - grow enough organic soybeans to serve as animal feed. The show discusses how, to ease the shortage, organic meat and egg producers are turning instead to India or China.
  • 1:00 am
  • 2:00 am
    Radio Specials America Abroad Women's Rights After the Arab Spring -- In the three years since the start of the Arab Spring, women have seen little or no improvement when it comes to fundamental rights. Many have actually seen rights taken away, as secular dictators give way to strict fundamentalists. The program visits Egypt where under the newly adopted constitution, women are supposed to have equality in "all civil, political, economic, social, and cultural rights." The program also hears from Turkey where women are feeling the effects of newly empowered religious conservative parties, as well as from women in Kuwait about their day-to-day lives.
  • 3:00 am
    Morning Edition A Phone for the Ultra-Private If you worry a lot about N.S.A. wiretapping or corporate data mining, the makers of the Blackphone want you. It's a smart phone so secure it encrypts your calls and texts. The show talks about the phone for the ultra-private.
  • 5:00 am
  • MORNING
  • 6:33 am
    The Do List Host Cy Musiker and San Francisco Chronicle Executive Datebook editor David Wiegand look ahead at the hottest tickets and most spectacular shows this coming week in Northern California.
  • 8:00 am
  • 8:33 am
    The Do List The Do List This week we're listening to an angel, jazz in San Jose, and we're stretching our understanding of yoga.
  • 9:00 am
    Forum SFPD Officers Federally Indicted for Theft, Drug Dealing and Other Crimes A federal grand jury has indicted five San Francisco police officers and one former officer on charges including extortion, drug dealing and theft. The indictments follow a broad federal investigation initiated after San Francisco Public Defender Jeff Adachi released a series of surveillance videos in 2011 that he says showed a pattern of misconduct by officers. We discuss the charges and the fallout from the indictments.
  • 9:30 am
    Forum Digging up Treasure Island's Radioactive Past A story published on Tuesday by the Center for Investigative Reporting looks at recent findings of radioactive contamination on Treasure Island, and examines the legacy of radioactive materials used by the U.S. Navy. The report also questions whether the island is safe for current residents and explores the implications for San Francisco's plans to build thousands of new units on the former base. We talk to the reporters about the Center's yearlong investigation.
  • 10:00 am
    Forum San Francisco's Grammy-Winning Pacific Mambo Orchestra The Bay Area-based Pacific Mambo Orchestra snagged a Grammy in January, beating out singer Marc Anthony for Best Tropical Latin Album, even though the group had no major-label recording contract. The 19-piece band, founded by pianist Christian Tumalan and trumpeter Steffen Kuehn, takes inspiration from the Latin big bands from the 1940s through 1960s. They join us for a live performance, and talk about funding their first album with Kickstarter and their work with school music programs.
  • 11:00 am
    Science Friday The Online Lives of Teenagers Today's networked teens have been called digital natives, digital zombies, bullies and victims. Researcher Danah Boyd calls them fine. Host Ira Flatow takes a look at the online lives of teenagers. The show also looks at your brain under the influence of jazz.
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Science Friday The Highs and Lows of Bitcoin This week, one of Bitcoin's largest currency exchanges disappeared overnight, along with over 700,000 coins. Could this be the end for the cryptocurrency? Host Ira Flatow takes a look at the highs and lows of Bitcoin. Also, Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz talks about our energy future.
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air Colm Toibin and 'The Testament of Mary' In a rebroadcast from December 3, 2012, host Terry Gross speaks with Irish novelist, essayist, and short-story writer Colm Toibin. He's the author of the bestseller "Brooklyn," about a young girl's emigration from Ireland to the U.S. in the 1950s. His book "The Testament of Mary" is out in paperback. It imagines how Mary would remember her son Jesus, 20 years after his crucifixion. Toibin is the author of a number of novels including "The Heather Blazing," "The Blackwater Lightship," "The Master," and the short story collection, "Mothers and Sons."
  • 2:00 pm
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace Innovators: Meeting Oscar Micheaux For the next installment of their "Innovators" series, the show travels back in time to the 1920s to meet Oscar Micheaux, the first African-American feature filmmaker in the U.S.
  • 4:30 pm
    The California Report The California Report Magazine The Academy Awards are all about glitz and glamour -- but it takes real people to build all that fantasy. As film and TV productions are lured out of state by tax and other incentives, awards season is a real injection for the carpenters, welders and sculptors who build the stages and props. Reporter Caitlin Esch took a trip behind the scenes to see how Hollywood prepares for the biggest night of the year.
  • 5:00 pm
    All Things Considered
    KQED News 4:30pm, 5:04pm, 5:30pm, 6:04pm & 7:04pm


    Week in Politics -- Melissa Block speaks with regular political commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and Brookings Institution and David Brooks of The New York Times. They discuss President Obama's new initiative to support young boys and men of color, the ongoing turmoil in Ukraine and Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer's decision to veto a controversial Arizona bill that would have allowed businesses to refuse service to the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community.
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    The California Report Behind the Scenes at the Academy Awards The Academy Awards are all about glitz and glamour -- but it takes real people to build all that fantasy. As film and TV productions are lured out of state by tax and other incentives, awards season is a real injection for the carpenters, welders and sculptors who build the stages and props. Reporter Caitlin Esch took a trip behind the scenes to see how Hollywood prepares for the biggest night of the year.
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air Colm Toibin and 'The Testament of Mary' In a rebroadcast from December 3, 2012, host Terry Gross speaks with Irish novelist, essayist, and short-story writer Colm Toibin. He's the author of the bestseller "Brooklyn," about a young girl's emigration from Ireland to the U.S. in the 1950s. His book "The Testament of Mary" is out in paperback. It imagines how Mary would remember her son Jesus, 20 years after his crucifixion. Toibin is the author of a number of novels including "The Heather Blazing," "The Blackwater Lightship," "The Master," and the short story collection, "Mothers and Sons."
  • 8:00 pm
    Commonwealth Club R&D, Innovation Labs and Channeling Your Inner Startup With constantly evolving technology and the challenge to think outside the box, the trend of separate innovation "labs" has spread amongst big name businesses. Companies that have shed their "startup" classification are keeping their crews nimble by designating teams to experiment - try and fail and try, try again - in an effort to go toe-to-toe with each new startup. You wouldn't immediately connect nimble, tech-savvy creators with big standalone brands; yet these companies are able to give creative minds what they need most - the opportunity to fail without long-term damage. So how do these teams fit within the larger corporate structure? What's the difference between an R&D team and an innovations lab? How do these teams keep a startup mentality working for established brands and products? And how do they use technology and new ideas to reach the perfect consumer for their brand? The show's panelists discuss the importance of innovation within large companies and how corporate teams are thinking like startups and projects that have both succeeded and failed in the labs. Panelists include: Will Young, director of Zappos Labs; Brian Luerssen, GM of OKCupid Labs; Mark Randall, chief strategist and VP of creativity at Adobe; and James Temple, senior editor for Re/code.
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
    Forum San Francisco's Grammy-Winning Pacific Mambo Orchestra The Bay Area-based Pacific Mambo Orchestra snagged a Grammy in January, beating out singer Marc Anthony for Best Tropical Latin Album, even though the group had no major-label recording contract. The 19-piece band, founded by pianist Christian Tumalan and trumpeter Steffen Kuehn, takes inspiration from the Latin big bands from the 1940s through 1960s. They join us for a live performance, and talk about funding their first album with Kickstarter and their work with school music programs.
  • 11:00 pm
    The California Report Behind the Scenes at the Academy Awards The Academy Awards are all about glitz and glamour -- but it takes real people to build all that fantasy. As film and TV productions are lured out of state by tax and other incentives, awards season is a real injection for the carpenters, welders and sculptors who build the stages and props. Reporter Caitlin Esch took a trip behind the scenes to see how Hollywood prepares for the biggest night of the year.
  • 11:30 pm
    All Things Considered The Picky Eaters Project The program talks with cookbook author Sally Sampson and obesity specialist Dr. David Ludwig about their Picky Eater Project, which aims to learn why some children have picky eating habits and what some remedies may be. Sampson has been blogging about picky eaters on The New York Times website.
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Syria's Refugee Crisis The program discusses how Syrians are soon to become the world's largest refugee population. The exodus is straining the stability of neighbors who don't have the infrastructure to support both their own citizens and refugees.
Friday, February 28, 2014

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