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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Wednesday, February 26, 2014

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Wednesday, February 26, 2014
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Venezuela Demonstrations Students and members of the middle class have taken to the streets in Venezuela, protesting a worsening economy and food shortages. AP bureau chief Joshua Goodman reports on the unrest from Caracas.
  • 1:00 am
  • 2:00 am
    City Arts & Lectures B.J. Novak B.J. Novak is an actor, stand-up comedian, screenwriter and director. He worked on the television series "The Office," first as a writer and co-executive producer and later as an actor. Novak's other television and film credits include "Saving Mr. Banks," "Inglourious Basterds" and the TV series "The Mindy Project." Novak's new book is "One More Thing: Stories and Other Stories." Naturally, the stories are quite funny. They also showcase Novak's astonishing range and genuine curiosity, drawing comparisons to David Sedaris, Steve Martin and George Saunders. Novak talks about the collection with KQED's Paul Lancour.
  • 3:00 am
    Morning Edition Is the International Community Doing Enough to Help Syrians? Millions of Syrian refugees have crossed the border into other countries to escape civil war. Critics say the U.S. and its allies haven't done enough to help. The show examines the international community's response to the Syrian refugee crisis.
  • 5:00 am
    Morning Edition
    The California Report 5:50am, 6:50am & 8:50am

    KQED News 6am, 6:30am, 7am, 7:30am, 8am, 8:30am, 9am, 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm & 4:30pm


    Perspectives 6:06am, 7:35am & 11:30pm

  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
  • 9:00 am
    Forum The Ethics of Cybersecurity The cybersecurity trade show known as the RSA conference kicked off in San Francisco this week. The conference begins two months after revelations that the RSA Corporation allegedly accepted $10 million from the National Security Agency to engineer a "back door" allowing NSA access to its encryption products. In the resulting backlash, some of the scheduled speakers are boycotting the RSA conference and have created their own spinoff conference, TrustyCon, which opens Thursday. We discuss cyber ethics and what this rift means for hackers and the online security industry in the Bay Area.
  • 10:00 am
    Forum What's the Best Way to Treat Back Pain? More than one in four adults in the U.S. say they have recently suffered from low-back pain. Americans spend at least $50 billion a year trying to make their backs feel better, but research has raised questions about the effectiveness of common medical approaches like surgery and steroid injections. We examine the latest research and treatment options for bad backs.
  • 11:00 am
    Here & Now Obamacare's Problems With Latino Engagement Obamacare sign-ups are lagging among Latinos. A California congresswoman says the reasons are predictable.
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    The Takeaway Obesity Rates Drop Sharply for Young Children A stunning new report shows that childhood obesity rates have dropped by 43 percent for kids two to five years old. What has changed in the last decade and what does this mean for older Americans and the country's obesity epidemic?
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air Egypt's Ongoing Government Crackdown The New York Times' Cairo bureau chief and Middle East correspondent David Kirkpatrick talks about his investigation into the attack on the American mission in Benghazi. He'll also discuss events in Egypt, where he says the government crackdown on protests and political opposition is unlike anything in modern Egyptian history.
  • 2:00 pm
    World How Mexican Mole Was Invented Mexican mole was not invented by restaurant chefs, but by sisters in Mexican convents who mixed up what they had on hand. The show talks with chef Barbara Sibley, who grew up in Mexico and connects Mexican history with today's Mexican food.
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace The First African-American Cartoonist The first African-American female cartoonist, Jackie Ormes, used her drawing pen as a weapon to take on topics like racism, education and foreign policy, in the newsroom.
  • 4:30 pm
    All Things Considered
    KQED News 4:30pm, 5:04pm, 5:30pm, 6:04pm & 7:04pm


    As Drought Continues, Calif. Looks to Desalination -- As California suffers from a major drought, some climate scientists are saying this may be the new normal. That's prompted state officials to look for alternative water sources like desalination plants. Some argue that the technology hurts the environment and is too expensive; others say it's a small price to pay for a reliable, drought-proof water source.
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Marketplace The First African-American Cartoonist The first African-American female cartoonist, Jackie Ormes, used her drawing pen as a weapon to take on topics like racism, education and foreign policy, in the newsroom.
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air Egypt's Ongoing Government Crackdown The New York Times' Cairo bureau chief and Middle East correspondent David Kirkpatrick talks about his investigation into the attack on the American mission in Benghazi. He'll also discuss events in Egypt, where he says the government crackdown on protests and political opposition is unlike anything in modern Egyptian history.
  • 8:00 pm
    Radio Specials Intelligence Squared U.S. Are We Meant to be Carnivores? -- According to a 2009 poll, around 1 percent of American adults reported eating no animal products. In 2011 that number rose to 2.5 percent -- more than double, but still dwarfed by the 48 percent who reported eating meat, fish or poultry at all of their meals. In the U.S., most of us are blessed with an abundance of food and food choices. So taking into account our health, the environment and ethical concerns, which diet is best? Are we or aren't we meant to be carnivores?
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
    Forum What's the Best Way to Treat Back Pain? More than one in four adults in the U.S. say they have recently suffered from low-back pain. Americans spend at least $50 billion a year trying to make their backs feel better, but research has raised questions about the effectiveness of common medical approaches like surgery and steroid injections. We examine the latest research and treatment options for bad backs.
  • 11:00 pm
    All Things Considered Cybersecurity Experts Worry About Third-Party Vendors Following several high-profile data breaches at retailers, Americans are understandably wary of being victimized by high-tech crimes. As KQED's Aarti Shahani reports, data is more vulnerable when companies outsource technology jobs to third-party vendors with lax security.
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered School Discipline Changes Since the mid-1990s, schools have increasingly disciplined students with harsh tactics like suspensions and even the criminal courts. Now, the pendulum is swinging in the other direction. The program reports that even in Texas -- one of the most aggressive states in criminalizing students' misbehavior -- there is a movement for change.
Wednesday, February 26, 2014

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