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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Tuesday, February 25, 2014

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Tuesday, February 25, 2014
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Remembering Harold Ramis Bob Mondello remembers writer and actor Harold Ramis, who wrote the hit comedies "Ghostbusters," "Groundhog Day," "Animal House" and "Caddyshack."
  • 1:00 am
  • 2:00 am
    It's Your World (a broadcast of the World Affairs Council) Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew Jacob J. Lew, secretary of the Treasury of the United States, provides insight into the state of the U.S. economy and touches upon many of the issues that are affected by it. Lew advocates for the role that government plays to create opportunity and shares his thoughts on small business investment, the skills gap, minimum wage and immigration. Taking a global view, Treasury Secretary Lew anticipates the annual G20 Summit and states the U.S. priorities for this important international gathering of finance ministers and central bank governors across the globe.
  • 3:00 am
    Morning Edition Beck's Rocky Road to His New Album It's been almost six years since Beck's last album - and they haven't been easy ones. He was recovering from a serious back injury, and two other albums he started didn't work out. The show gets the story on the rocky road to Beck's serene new album, "Morning Phase."
  • 5:00 am
    Morning Edition
    The California Report 5:50am, 6:50am & 8:50am

    KQED News 6am, 6:30am, 7am, 7:30am, 8am, 8:30am, 9am, 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm & 4:30pm


    Perspectives 6:06am, 7:35am & 11:30pm

  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
  • 9:00 am
    Forum Former Governors Fight to Speed Up California Executions Former California governors George Deukmejian, Pete Wilson and Gray Davis are backing a proposed ballot initiative to streamline the death penalty process. The proposal would put a five-year limit on death penalty appeals and make other changes to the way the state manages condemned prisoners. Opponents say the measure would lead to more expensive legal battles and increase the chances that an innocent person could be put to death.
  • 10:00 am
    Forum Physicist Argues Reality is Simply a Mathematical Structure Scientists have long pondered why it is that mathematics so effectively explain how the world works. M.I.T. physicist Max Tegmark has a theory -- he argues that the universe is actually a mathematical structure. Tegmark joins us to discuss that theory, his belief in parallel universes and his book, "Our Mathematical Universe: My Quest for the Ultimate Nature of Reality."
  • 11:00 am
    Here & Now NYPD Chief Bill Bratton The show talks with "tough-on-crime" Police Commissioner Bill Bratton as he takes charge of the NYPD for the second time in his career. What has he learned from his experience in combating crime in the nation's largest cities?
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    The Takeaway Will Hagel Succeed in Shrinking the Army? Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel has announced a drastic reduction in the size of the U.S. Army, bringing down the number of forces to pre-World War II levels. Several Pentagon officials have tried and failed to do this in the past. The show looks at the history of these proposals and what Hagel's proposed budget would mean for the future of the U.S. military.
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air Germany's Secret War Against the U.S. in 1915 Even though the United States took a stance of neutrality when World War I began, the German government quickly initiated a campaign of sabotage in the U.S. including bombings of factories and ships, an Anthrax attack and a daring attempt on the life of J.P. Morgan. Howard Blum joins guest host Dave Davies to tell the story. His book is "Dark Invasion: Germany's Secret War Against America."
  • 2:00 pm
    World German Mining Town a Time Capsule in African Desert There's a 100-year-old mining town built by Germans in Southern Namibia. Now it's a ghost town covered with sand dunes - and it's remarkably well preserved. The show talks with a photographer who spent a week there.
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace Tech Privacy Boom? With all these credit card hackings and security breaches happening, the business of privacy protection companies is growing.
  • 4:30 pm
    All Things Considered
    KQED News 4:30pm, 5:04pm, 5:30pm, 6:04pm & 7:04pm


    Voice-Banking Program Helps Those About to Lose Their Ability to Speak -- If you knew you were soon to lose your ability to speak, what messages would you save in your own voice? That's a question confronting ALS patients, most of whom lose their ability to communicate except through artificial means. The show reports on a program at a Seattle hospital that encourages patients to "bank" their voices. Then, using devices later, they'll be able to speak with their own voices, mannerisms and personalities.
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Marketplace Tech Privacy Boom? With all these credit card hackings and security breaches happening, the business of privacy protection companies is growing.
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air Germany's Secret War Against the U.S. in 1915 Even though the United States took a stance of neutrality when World War I began, the German government quickly initiated a campaign of sabotage in the U.S. including bombings of factories and ships, an Anthrax attack and a daring attempt on the life of J.P. Morgan. Howard Blum joins guest host Dave Davies to tell the story. His book is "Dark Invasion: Germany's Secret War Against America."
  • 8:00 pm
    City Arts & Lectures B.J. Novak B.J. Novak is an actor, stand-up comedian, screenwriter and director. He worked on the television series "The Office," first as a writer and co-executive producer and later as an actor. Novak's other television and film credits include "Saving Mr. Banks," "Inglourious Basterds" and the TV series "The Mindy Project." Novak's new book is "One More Thing: Stories and Other Stories." Naturally, the stories are quite funny. They also showcase Novak's astonishing range and genuine curiosity, drawing comparisons to David Sedaris, Steve Martin and George Saunders. Novak talks about the collection with KQED's Paul Lancour.
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
    Forum Physicist Argues Reality is Simply a Mathematical Structure Scientists have long pondered why it is that mathematics so effectively explain how the world works. M.I.T. physicist Max Tegmark has a theory -- he argues that the universe is actually a mathematical structure. Tegmark joins us to discuss that theory, his belief in parallel universes and his book, "Our Mathematical Universe: My Quest for the Ultimate Nature of Reality."
  • 11:00 pm
    All Things Considered Boeing's Dreamliner Woes Continue One year after Boeing's entire fleet of 787 Dreamliner jets was grounded for battery fires, the high-tech planes are back in the air. They're not without significant reliability problems, though. Complaints are streaming in from airlines throughout the world, expressing frustration with software and production failures. Boeing describes these issues as "growing pains" common to any new plane and says that steps are being taken to correct them.
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Venezuela Demonstrations Students and members of the middle class have taken to the streets in Venezuela, protesting a worsening economy and food shortages. AP bureau chief Joshua Goodman reports on the unrest from Caracas.
Tuesday, February 25, 2014

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