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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Friday, October 11, 2013

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Friday, October 11, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Welfare vs. Work The CATO Institute finds that, in 35 states, it makes sense to stay on welfare rather than take a low-paying job. But welfare recipients say what's discouraging them from working isn't a possible loss of benefits, but a lack of jobs, transportation and child care.
  • 1:00 am
  • 2:00 am
    Radio Specials Climate One Corn, Cars and Cows -- Putting gasoline blended with corn in your gas tank can increase the cost of food on your kitchen table. That's the claim of farmers and ranchers who say federal policies mandating corn ethanol production raise the price of feed for American cattle, pork and poultry. Furthermore, transportation fuel including corn doesn't reduce carbon pollution much when its entire lifecycle is considered. Does corn have a place in powering America's future? How does it impact California's clean energy goals? The program hosts a discussion with Colin Carter, professor of agricultural economics at UC Davis; Neil Koehler, CEO of Pacific Ethanol; and Michael Marsh, CEO of Western United Dairymen.
  • 3:00 am
    Morning Edition Sharing the N.S.A.'s SecretsEdward Snowden has revealed some of the government's top secrets -- and so has the government. The Obama administration has declassified more secret material than ever before. The program discusses how some security analysts think it's too much.
  • 5:00 am
  • MORNING
  • 6:33 am
    The Do List Host Cy Musiker and San Francisco Chronicle Executive Datebook editor David Wiegand look ahead at the hottest tickets and most spectacular shows this coming week in Northern California.
  • 7:00 am
  • 8:33 am
    The Do List The Do List This week we're riding out a literary quake, and celebrating some young rascals.
  • 9:00 am
    Forum BART Dispute Update We'll get the latest on the BART labor dispute and ongoing negotiations.
  • 9:30 am
    Forum Foster Farms Chicken Linked to Salmonella Outbreak Foster Farms may be forced to close three California processing plants in the wake of a salmonella outbreak linked to its poultry that has sickened at least 278 people across 17 states. The U.S. Department of Agriculture issued a warning, but not a recall; Foster Farms blames the sicknesses on undercooked or improperly handled chicken. About 30 furloughed employees from the Centers for Disease and Control were called back to work to handle the investigation. We discuss the issue.
  • 10:00 am
    Forum Hip Hop as Therapy A decade ago, when social worker Tomás Alvarez III was working as a school counselor at Berkeley High, he assumed that as a man of color he would have more success than the other counselors -- mostly white and female -- in reaching African-American male students struggling with truancy and other problems. But, he found, they weren't any more interested in talking to him than the others. A search to find ways to get young black males to discuss the trauma in their lives led him to found the Oakland-based nonprofit Beats, Rhymes and Life, which uses rap and hip-hop as a form of therapy. We'll talk to the programs' co-founders and two participants about the positive effects of telling their stories through their lyrics and music.
  • 11:00 am
    Science Friday The Affordable Care Act and Our Health The Affordable Care Act opened its marketplace last week, but will the law actually make us healthier? The program looks at how Obamacare may affect patient health. Also, are there accurate pitching predictions and mathematical models for baseball's post-season?
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Science Friday This Year's Nobel Prize Winners The program has a roundup of this year's Nobel Prize winners. It also looks back to Paris during World War II, when biologist Jacques Monod and philosopher Albert Camus -- both Nobel Laureates themselves -- fought the Nazi occupation.
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air Andrew Solomon's 'Far From the Tree' What is it like for parents who have a child who is profoundly different, or likely to be stigmatized -- one born with Down syndrome, autism or dwarfism, or one who is conceived in rape? Writer Andrew Solomon's new book, "Far From the Tree: Parents, Children and the Search for Identity," explores such questions. The National Book Award winner and Pulitzer Prize finalist speaks with guest host David Bianculli.
  • 2:00 pm
    World Lego Grows Up The program discusses how Legos, the plastic bricks from Denmark, have become high-end construction toys for grownups.
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace The Costs and Consequences of Refinancing Refinancing has transformed home buying, home owning, spending and saving. But what are the costs and consequences for individuals, communities, and the overall economy?
  • 4:30 pm
    The California Report The California Report Magazine As the standoff continues in Washington, we talk about those feeling the impact of the federal government shutdown. We also discuss hunger in the Central Valley, as produce rots in the fields.
  • 5:00 pm
    All Things Considered
    KQED News 4:30pm, 5:04pm, 5:30pm, 6:04pm & 7:04pm


    Week in Politics -- The program talks with regular political commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and the Brookings Institution, and David Brooks with The New York Times. They discuss the federal government shutdown and the debt ceiling debates.
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    The California Report The California Report Magazine As the standoff continues in Washington, we talk about those feeling the impact of the federal government shutdown. We also discuss hunger in the Central Valley, as produce rots in the fields.
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air Andrew Solomon's 'Far From the Tree' What is it like for parents who have a child who is profoundly different, or likely to be stigmatized -- one born with Down syndrome, autism or dwarfism, or one who is conceived in rape? Writer Andrew Solomon's new book, "Far From the Tree: Parents, Children and the Search for Identity," explores such questions. The National Book Award winner and Pulitzer Prize finalist speaks with guest host David Bianculli.
  • 8:00 pm
    Commonwealth Club Producer Rebecca Eaton: Inside 'Downton Abbey' and 'Masterpiece' Get the behind-the-scenes scoop on "Downton Abbey" and PBS' "Masterpiece" series from Rebecca Eaton, the executive producer who has made it a hit for nearly 30 years. Eaton's credits include "Downton Abbey," "Prime Suspect," "Bleak House," "The Lost Prince," "Miss Marple," "Inspector Morse," "Cranford," "The Complete Jane Austen," "Little Dorrit," "Sherlock" and the remake of "Upstairs Downstairs," along with such films as "Jane Austen's Persuasion" and "Mrs. Brown." Eaton's honors include 44 Primetime Emmy Awards, 15 Peabody Awards, 4 Golden Globes, and two Academy Award nominations. Queen Elizabeth II has honored her with an honorary OBE (Officer, Order of the British Empire) and in 2011, she was one of Time Magazine's "100 Most Influential People in the World." She appeared in conversation with Dr. Mary Bitterman, president of The Bernard Osher Foundation, on August 7, 2013.
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
    Forum BART Dispute Update We'll get the latest on the BART labor dispute and ongoing negotiations.
  • 10:30 pm
    Forum Foster Farms Chicken Linked to Salmonella Outbreak Foster Farms may be forced to close three California processing plants in the wake of a salmonella outbreak linked to its poultry that has sickened at least 278 people across 17 states. The U.S. Department of Agriculture issued a warning, but not a recall; Foster Farms blames the sicknesses on undercooked or improperly handled chicken. About 30 furloughed employees from the Centers for Disease and Control were called back to work to handle the investigation. We discuss the issue.
  • 11:00 pm
    The California Report The California Report Magazine As the standoff continues in Washington, we talk about those feeling the impact of the federal government shutdown. We also discuss hunger in the Central Valley, as produce rots in the fields.
  • 11:30 pm
    All Things Considered Snowden's Life in Exile On Thursday, we saw the first image of former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden since he was granted temporary asylum in Russia in August. He's shown in a photograph taken in Moscow getting an award for being a whistle-blower. The program talks to one of the fellow whistle-blowers who gave him the award in Moscow to get a glimpse of Snowden's life of exile in Russia.
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Nobel Peace Prize Winner The Nobel Peace Prize is being awarded this year to chemical weapons inspectors involved in a dangerous mission in Syria. The Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical weapons is the guardian of the global ban on chemical weapons. The Norwegian Nobel Committee wanted to highlight its work not just in Syria but around the world, as it tries to get rid of an entire class of weapons.
Friday, October 11, 2013

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