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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Sunday, September 8, 2013

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Sunday, September 8, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    Wait, Wait Don't Tell Me This quiz show takes a fresh, fast-paced and irreverent look at the week's events. NPR veteran newscaster Carl Kassell is the program's judge, scorekeeper, and quiz show impersonator extraordinaire.
  • 1:00 am
    Studio 360 American Icons: 'Native Son' The story of a young man in the ghetto who turns to murder was an overnight sensation. Richard Wright set out to confront white readers with the most brutal consequences of racism, and finally lay to rest the stereotype of the passive Uncle Tom -- "he literally wanted to create a bigger Thomas," one scholar argues. But some think "Native Son" exploited the worst stereotypes of black youth.
  • 2:00 am
    To the Best of Our Knowledge Alternative Endings What if our lives were like DVDs? What if we had alternative endings to look forward to, instead of death? The show explores our lust for immortality, and looks at the many alternative endings that Ernest Hemingway wrote for his classic novel, "A Farewell to Arms."
  • 3:00 am
    To the Best of Our Knowledge More Wonder! When's the last time you were wonder-struck? Would your life be richer for more wonder? The show explores what wonder is, how to make it, where to find it and what it does for us.
  • 4:00 am
    Living On Earth Fukushima's Wall of Ice Japanese authorities are unable to control the radioactive water leaking out of the damaged Fukushima nuclear power plant. Now the government plans to install a wall of ice around the facility to contain the contaminated water. Ed Lyman, from the Union of Concerned Scientists, tells host Steve Curwood that the new ice wall plan is likely an act of desperation, and that some American reactors are at risk for the same kind of flooding disaster.
  • 5:00 am
  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
    Weekend Edition
    Perspectives7:36am & 8:36am

  • 10:00 am
    Car Talk Click and Clack tackle the tougher questions of the automobile world.
  • 11:00 am
    A Prairie Home Companion One Last Repeat for Summer The show presents one final summer repeat - a program originally from November, 2011 at St. Olaf College in Northfield, Minnesota. The St. Olaf Orchestra and St. Olaf Choir team up for "Fields of Gold," Garrison and Philip Brunelle highlight a few lesser-known Choir pianists, and Heather Masse sings "A Distant Melody." In Lake Wobegon, exiles return home for Thanksgiving.
  • AFTERNOON
  • 1:30 pm
    City Arts & Lectures Daniel Kahneman: Thinking Fast and Slow Daniel Kahneman is one of the most influential living psychologists. Along with his late collaborator, Amos Tversky, Kahneman is credited with founding the study of behavioral economics. In 2002, Kahneman won the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences for his research on the irrational ways in which humans make decisions about risk. Based on his decades of study with Tversky, Kahneman's recent book, "Thinking Fast and Slow," is an exploration of the psychological basis for reactions, judgments, recognition, choices, conclusions, and much more. Kahneman is professor emeritus of psychology and public affairs at the Woodrow Wilson School, the Eugene Higgins Professor of Psychology Emeritus at Princeton University, and a fellow at the Center for Rationality at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem. He appeared in conversation with Jonathan Bass, a partner at the law firm of Coblentz, Patch, Duffy and Bass LLP, on April 2, 2013 at the Herbst Theatre.
  • 2:00 pm
    On the Media Iraq vs. Syria Coverage of the proposed military intervention in Syria is attracting inevitable comparisons to the run-up to the Iraq war, which began 10 years ago. But this time around, with Iraq still fresh in the country's collective memory, the media seem to be more careful. The program speaks to Max Fisher, foreign affairs blogger for the Washington Post, about the media's coverage of Syria, and how the inevitable comparison to Iraq may not be that useful.
  • 3:00 pm
    Latino USA Class of 2030: Dual Language in the South A demographic surge of young Latinos is making their way through school, and by the time they're out of college, the year will be 2030. In this first installment of our year-long series, Maria Hinojosa talks to teacher Elizabeth Bonitz about how dual language programs have become more popular in her town of Siler City, North Carolina.
  • 4:00 pm
    Says You! The witty word trivia game from member station WGBH in Boston.
  • 5:00 pm
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    Check, Please! Bay Area KQED Public Television's popular restaurant review program returns to the radio. In this episode, diners eat at Aslam's Rasoi and Poesia in San Francisco, and at encuentro cafe and wine bar in Oakland.
  • 6:30 pm
    Cambridge Forum Joss Whedon: Cultural Humanist Television writer and director Joss Whedon receives the 2009 Outstanding Lifetime Achievement Award in Cultural Humanism from the Harvard Humanist Chaplaincy. The creator of the long-running television series "Buffy the Vampire Slayer" explores the moral foundations of a humanistic universe.
  • 7:00 pm
    To the Best of Our Knowledge Alternative Endings What if our lives were like DVDs? What if we had alternative endings to look forward to, instead of death? The show explores our lust for immortality, and looks at the many alternative endings that Ernest Hemingway wrote for his classic novel, "A Farewell to Arms."
  • 8:00 pm
    To the Best of Our Knowledge More Wonder! When's the last time you were wonder-struck? Would your life be richer for more wonder? The show explores what wonder is, how to make it, where to find it and what it does for us.
  • 9:00 pm
    Marketplace Money Who You Are is How You Save There's nothing quite like retirement planning for a unique blend of math and magical thinking. We imagine everything will work out fine. That the money we invest will grow and will be there when we need it. Also, who we are affects how we decide to use our retirement dollars. Suzanne Shu, assistant professor at UCLA's Anderson School of Management, studies the consumer behavior of retirees. She joins guest host Lizzie O'Leary to talk about personality and personal finance choices.
  • 10:00 pm
    TED Radio Hour The Next Greatest Generation? Whether you call them Millennials, Generation Y or the Me Generation, one thing's for certain: these young people will change the world. But what will be its legacy? This hour, we hear TED speakers searching to define themselves and their generation.
  • 11:00 pm
    Tech Nation A weekly program focusing on the impact of technology in our lives.
  • 12:00 am
    On the Media Iraq vs. Syria Coverage of the proposed military intervention in Syria is attracting inevitable comparisons to the run-up to the Iraq war, which began 10 years ago. But this time around, with Iraq still fresh in the country's collective memory, the media seem to be more careful. The program speaks to Max Fisher, foreign affairs blogger for the Washington Post, about the media's coverage of Syria, and how the inevitable comparison to Iraq may not be that useful.
Sunday, September 8, 2013

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