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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Saturday, September 7, 2013

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, September 7, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered The NSA and Encryption Documents revealed by former government contractor Edward Snowden show the National Security Agency has the ability to crack encryption that is supposed to keep communications and data private. The NSA has also worked with companies to insert vulnerabilities into their products to make them hackable by the NSA. Robert Siegel talks with Stuart Millar, U.S. deputy editor for The Guardian.
  • 1:00 am
    This Week in Northern California America's Cup Finals The America's Cup finals begin on Saturday, pitting Larry Ellison's Oracle Team USA against Emirates Team New Zealand in a best-of-17 series that could last two weeks. Meanwhile, illegal weights on a Team USA catamaran have resulted in what are being described as the harshest penalties in the history of the sailing competition. The team was docked two points and fined $250,000 and a jury banned three team members from further participation in this year's races.
  • 1:30 am
    Washington Week Attacking Syria: The Risks and Consequences The debate over U.S. intervention in Syria played out in Washington and on the global stage this week. There were hearings on Capitol Hill and President Obama presented his arguments for military involvement during an overseas news conference ahead of the G-20 meetings in Russia.President Obama insists that the credibility of the United States, Congress and the international community is on the line over any response to Syria's alleged use of chemical weapons. Host Gwen Ifill examines the high-stakes risks and consequences of a U.S.-led attack on Syria.
  • 2:00 am
    Commonwealth Club Iraq's Ambassador to the United States Iraq's new ambassador to the U.S., Lukman Faily, represents a rising generation of professionals, business leaders and civic activists who have returned home to build a free-market democracy in their native land. Faily brings extensive experience in diplomacy, business organization management, information technology and civic activism, as well as a familiarity with Anglo-American traditions and institutions, to his new role in Washington. He appears in conversation with Robert Rosenthal, executive director of the Center for Investigative Reporting.
  • 3:00 am
    Inside Europe Syrian Refugees Now Number 2 Million The crisis in Syria reached a critical juncture this week. After two and a half years of war, more than 2 million people have now fled Syria. Over 4 million are internally displaced. Officials in Cyprus, which lies off the Syrian coast, have begun the challenging task of planning to take care of evacuated foreign nationals fleeing the conflict. The plan comes as Nicosia continues to insist that the island remains a safe haven and is not a target for Syrian missile attacks, despite a massive western military presence in the Mediterranean.
  • 4:00 am
    It's Your World (a broadcast of the World Affairs Council) Left-Leaning Latin America: Understanding U.S. Policy in the Region In 2004, the Bolivarian Alliance of the Americas was established under the leadership of late Venezuelan president Hugo Chavez. Several countries from Latin America and the Caribbean signed on, including Cuba, Bolivia, Ecuador, and Nicaragua. This seemed to have ushered in the era of a left-leaning Latin America that is a greater challenge for U.S. policy in the region. How have these leftist governments in Latin America fared, and how has U.S. policy toward the region adapted? Speakers include: Michael Shifter, president of the Inter-American Dialogue; and Julia Sweig, director of Latin America Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations.
  • 5:00 am
  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
    Weekend Edition
    Perspectives7:36am & 8:36am

  • 9:00 am
  • 10:00 am
    The Best of Car Talk Click and Clack tackle the tougher questions of the automobile world.
  • 11:00 am
    Wait, Wait Don't Tell Me This quiz show takes a fresh, fast-paced and irreverent look at the week's events. NPR veteran newscaster Carl Kassell is the program's judge, scorekeeper, and quiz show impersonator extraordinaire.
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    This American Life Rest Stop Nine radio producers. Two days. One rest stop on the New York State Thruway. The show presents stories of people who are just passing through, and people who are at the rest stop every day, working. One of them has worked there since 1969. A bunch of others came from Asia and Eastern Europe to pour coffee for travelers.
  • 1:30 pm
    Radiolab Radiolab Colors -- Our world is saturated in color, from soft hues to violent stains. How does something so intangible pack such a visceral punch? This hour, in the name of science and poetry, Jad and Robert tear the rainbow to pieces.
  • 2:30 pm
    Radio Specials Here's the Thing with Alec Baldwin Lena Dunham and Elaine Stritch -- As host of WNYC's "Here's the Thing," actor Alec Baldwin sidesteps the predictable in intimate conversations with notable individuals from the worlds of art, culture, policy, sports and more. Decades apart in age, both of Alec's guests have broken barriers and blazed new trails in how women are depicted on stage and screen. Alec visits first with Lena Dunham, creator and co-executive producer of the HBO hit series "Girls." Alec then speaks with actress Elaine Stritch, who after performing for nearly 70 years, recently moved home to Birmingham, Michigan. Stritch details her transition from the Sacred Heart Convent to New York theater classes sitting between Walter Matthau and Marlon Brando.
  • 3:30 pm
    Moyers & Company What Are We Doing in Syria? With the probability of American intervention, Syria is everywhere in the news. On this week's "Moyers & Company," Phil Donahue, filling in for Bill Moyers, speaks with NPR's Middle East correspondent Deborah Amos and historian and Vietnam veteran Andrew Bacevich about the possible repercussions of our actions in the Middle East.
  • 4:00 pm
    Living On Earth Fukushima's Wall of Ice Japanese authorities are unable to control the radioactive water leaking out of the damaged Fukushima nuclear power plant. Now the government plans to install a wall of ice around the facility to contain the contaminated water. Ed Lyman, from the Union of Concerned Scientists, tells host Steve Curwood that the new ice wall plan is likely an act of desperation, and that some American reactors are at risk for the same kind of flooding disaster.
  • 5:00 pm
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    A Prairie Home Companion One Last Repeat for Summer The show presents one final summer repeat - a program originally from November, 2011 at St. Olaf College in Northfield, Minnesota. The St. Olaf Orchestra and St. Olaf Choir team up for "Fields of Gold," Garrison and Philip Brunelle highlight a few lesser-known Choir pianists, and Heather Masse sings "A Distant Melody." In Lake Wobegon, exiles return home for Thanksgiving.
  • 8:00 pm
    Selected Shorts Expect the Unexpected Guest host Neil Gaiman presents tales with surprises. Jane Yolen's "The Babysitter" is a contemporary Gothic with a twist; James Thurber's classic "The Secret Life of Walter Mitty" introduces a milquetoast with attitude; Ray Bradbury's "The Pedestrian" anticipated our media-driven lives; and Thurber's "The Wood Duck" seems to have nine lives. The readers are Isaiah Sheffer, Dick Cavett, Jamey Sheridan, and Malachy McCourt.
  • 9:00 pm
    This American Life Rest Stop Nine radio producers. Two days. One rest stop on the New York State Thruway. The show presents stories of people who are just passing through, and people who are at the rest stop every day, working. One of them has worked there since 1969. A bunch of others came from Asia and Eastern Europe to pour coffee for travelers.
  • 10:00 pm
    The Moth Radio Hour Tattoos and Two Southern Gothics The Moth's founder, George Dawes Green, details the fireworks when his mother learns that her family plantation is slated to be turned into a theme park; a spectacularly eccentric mother and Savannah, GA work in tandem to create a true bohemian; and a guard at Sing Sing is intrigued by a prisoner's mysterious tattoo.
  • 11:00 pm
    Snap Judgment This quiz show takes a fresh, fast-paced and irreverent look at the week's events. NPR veteran newscaster Carl Kassell is the program's judge, scorekeeper, and quiz show impersonator extraordinaire.
  • 12:00 am
    Wait, Wait Don't Tell Me This quiz show takes a fresh, fast-paced and irreverent look at the week's events. NPR veteran newscaster Carl Kassell is the program's judge, scorekeeper, and quiz show impersonator extraordinaire.
Saturday, September 7, 2013

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