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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Wednesday, July 17, 2013

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Wednesday, July 17, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered The Growth of an Electronic Medical Records Company Cerner is one of the two large electronic medical records companies. It started out as a small company in Kansas City -- now it employs 12,000 people and can't hire engineers fast enough. The program looks at the growth of Cerner and the challenges it faces as it competes for business and tries to keep innovating.
  • 1:00 am
  • 2:00 am
    City Arts & Lectures Temple Grandin Temple Grandin is one of the world's most accomplished and well known adults with autism. She has a PhD in animal science from the University of Illinois and is a professor at Colorado State University. She is the author of four previous books, including the national bestsellers "Thinking in Pictures" and "Animals in Translation." Dr. Grandin is a past member of the board of directors of the Autism Society of America, and lectures to parents and teachers throughout the U.S. on her experiences with autism. Her work has been covered in the New York Times, People, National Public Radio, and 20/20. Most recently she was named one of Time Magazine's 100 most influential people of the year. The HBO movie based on her life, "Temple Grandin," received seven Emmy Awards. She spoke with Adam Savage on June 5, 2013.
  • 3:00 am
    Morning Edition The Increasing Market for Goth Dolls Barbie can be a veterinarian, a cheerleader, or a princess. The dolls of Monster High, however, can be vampires, werewolves, and ghouls -- and they're starting to cut into Barbie's market share. The program discusses how lots of children are now playing with Goth dolls.
  • 5:00 am
    Morning Edition
    The California Report 5:50am, 6:50am & 8:50am

    KQED News 6am, 6:30am, 7am, 7:30am, 8am, 8:30am, 9am, 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm & 4:30pm


    Perspectives 6:06am, 7:35am & 11:30pm

  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
  • 9:00 am
    Forum Congressman Doug LaMalfa on Representing Northeast California Republican freshman Congressman Doug LaMalfa joins us to talk about his first year on Capitol Hill. He represents California's 1st Congressional District, which covers Butte, Shasta, and the northeastern part of the state. The freshman congressman is a fourth generation rice farmer who recently helped pass regulatory relief to farms and ranches.
  • 9:30 am
    Forum Higher Mental Illness Rates Among Low-Income Californians A new mental health care study by the California HealthCare Foundation finds that serious mental illness shows up at much higher rates among lower-income children and adults in California than other income brackets. We'll discuss the report and what it can tell us about the prevalence of disease, access to care, and more.
  • 10:00 am
    Forum Niall Ferguson on the Degeneration of the West Harvard University historian Niall Ferguson, prized by many conservative economists and politicians, joins us to discuss his latest book, "The Great Degeneration". Ferguson recounts what he sees as the decline of the era of Western progress and power. We'll also get Ferguson's thoughts on recent news from unrest in Egypt to impediments to the Affordable Care Act.
  • 11:00 am
    Here & Now Georgia Congressman John Lewis on the Future of the Voting Rights Act The program speaks with Georgia congressman and civil rights leader John Lewis about the future of the Voting Rights Act. He has a message for his colleagues who think it's no longer necessary.
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    The Takeaway Congressional Leaders or Problems? The program asks: Are Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid and House Speaker John Boehner Congressional leaders, or problems that need to go away?
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air Musician Jason Isbell Host Terry Gross speaks with singer, songwriter, and guitarist Jason Isbell. Formerly with the band The Drive-by Truckers, he now has a new solo album, "Southeastern," with songs he wrote since he entered rehab and quit drinking. Critic Ken Tucker says the album "combines rock, folk and country music in a manner that permits Isbell to be as literary as he aspires to be, while also keeping him rooted in pop-music."
  • 2:00 pm
    World A Second Chance for Justice in Kenya In Kenya, very few prison inmates can afford a lawyer -- but now some are learning to be paralegals. The show discusses a new paralegal program in Kenya that is responsible for thousands of successful appeals.
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace Government Employees Gone Wild Freakonomics Radio's Stephen Dubner joins the program to discuss government employees gone wild. The show also reviews all the day's business headlines.
  • 4:30 pm
    All Things Considered
    KQED News 4:30pm, 5:04pm, 5:30pm, 6:04pm & 7:04pm


    North Korea and Cuba: Ties That Bind -- Many questions have been raised by the discovery of missile parts in a North Korean ship coming from Cuba and passing through the Panama Canal. Cuban authorities acknowledged sending the parts, but they have not explained why they are doing business with North Korea. The program discusses how the incident sheds some light on two of the most isolated regimes on the planet --and what political and commercial ties may bind them.
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Marketplace Government Employees Gone Wild Freakonomics Radio's Stephen Dubner joins the program to discuss government employees gone wild. The show also reviews all the day's business headlines.
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air Musician Jason Isbell Host Terry Gross speaks with singer, songwriter, and guitarist Jason Isbell. Formerly with the band The Drive-by Truckers, he now has a new solo album, "Southeastern," with songs he wrote since he entered rehab and quit drinking. Critic Ken Tucker says the album "combines rock, folk and country music in a manner that permits Isbell to be as literary as he aspires to be, while also keeping him rooted in pop-music."
  • 8:00 pm
    Radio Specials Intelligence Squared U.S. Is Cutting the Pentagon's Budget a Gift to Our Enemies? -- Political gridlock in Washington triggered across-the-board spending cuts, known as the sequester, in March. As a result, the Pentagon was given six months to eliminate $41 billion from the current year's budget, and unlike past cuts, this time everything is on the table. In 2011, America spent $711 billion dollars on its defense -- more than the next 13 highest spending countries combined. But the burdens the U.S. military shoulders, both at home and abroad, are unprecedented. Could the sequester be a rare opportunity to overhaul the armed forces, or will its impact damage military readiness and endanger national security?
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
    Forum Congressman Doug LaMalfa on Representing Northeast California Republican freshman Congressman Doug LaMalfa joins us to talk about his first year on Capitol Hill. He represents California's 1st Congressional District, which covers Butte, Shasta, and the northeastern part of the state. The freshman congressman is a fourth generation rice farmer who recently helped pass regulatory relief to farms and ranches.
  • 10:30 pm
    Forum Higher Mental Illness Rates Among Low Income Californians A new mental health care study by the California Healthcare Foundation finds that serious mental illness shows up at much higher rates among lower-income children and adults in California than other income brackets. We'll discuss the report and what it can tell us about the prevalence of disease, access to care, and more. Guests include: Neal Adams, deputy director of the California Institute for Mental Health; and Sandra Shewry, director for state health policy at the California HealthCare Foundation.
  • 11:00 pm
    All Things Considered Programs to Stop Sexual Assault in the Air Force The program speaks with Maj. Gen. Margaret Woodward, director of the U.S. Air Force Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Office. She's developing training and other programs to help stop sexual assault in the Air Force.
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Do Secret Courts Have to be So Secret? Do secret courts have to be so secret? The Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, or FISA Court, is the legal body that decides whether wiretaps and other surveillance methods used by the intelligence community are legal. Officials seem to agree that the procedures need to be more transparent, but how that would happen, the program discusses, is anything but clear.
Wednesday, July 17, 2013

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