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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Tuesday, May 7, 2013

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Tuesday, May 7, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Complications of Online Sales Tax The U.S. Senate is expected to pass a bill to allow states to collect sales tax from online sellers. Proponents say collection should be easy, despite rebuttals about how complicated it is to collect taxes from 9,600 jurisdictions. It's also not clear how far states will have to go to help small businesses. And some tax experts say it's an entirely new kind of tax that raises some issues for the future.
  • 1:00 am
  • 2:00 am
    It's Your World (a broadcast of the World Affairs Council) The Mirage of the Arab Spring The Arab Spring brought unprecedented changes across the Middle East and North Africa -- but the initial promise now seems to be fading. The political situation in Egypt remains uncertain, Syria continues to spiral out of control and Islamist rebels with ties to al-Qaida have wreaked havoc in North Africa. What future impact will we see from the Arab Spring in these regions? The program's guest is Seth Jones, associate director of the International Security and Defense Policy Center at the RAND Corporation.
  • 3:00 am
    Morning Edition A Truly Interactive Future Corinna Lathan has worked on innovations like gloves to control robots and hand-held devices to assess brain damage. She also imagines a time when computers help people share consciousness. The program shares a scientist's vision of a truly interactive future.
  • 5:00 am
    Morning Edition
    The California Report 5:50am, 6:50am & 8:50am

    KQED News 6am, 6:30am, 7am, 7:30am, 8am, 8:30am, 9am, 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm & 4:30pm


    Perspectives 6:06am, 7:35am & 11:30pm

  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
  • 9:00 am
    Forum Israeli Airstrikes on Syria Syria responded angrily to attacks believed to be from Israeli warplanes on Sunday, and accused Israel of coordinating with Syrian rebel groups. Its neighbor Iran also warned that it would respond to the aggression. We get the latest updates on what the airstrikes mean for the region.
  • 9:30 am
    Forum $2.25 Billion PG&E Fine Proposed for San Bruno Explosion California regulators want to penalize PG&E $2.25 billion for the 2010 San Bruno gas line explosion that killed eight people and injured 66. California Public Utility Commission staff recommended the hefty fine, which would be the largest penalty ever brought by a state regulator in the U.S., citing the severity of the damage and PG&E's "reprehensible" failures. Forum discusses the proposed penalty and what has changed since the deadly blast.
  • 10:00 am
    Forum Filmmaker William Friedkin Academy Award-winning filmmaker William Friedkin reached the Hollywood stratosphere in the 1970s with such groundbreaking films as "The French Connection" and "The Exorcist." But the success was not to last. As he writes in his new memoir, "I was at the edge of a cliff and my demons were standing by waiting to push me off." Today, Friedkin is still directing films -- including 2011's well-received "Killer Joe" -- and has even developed a second career as an opera director. He joins us in studio to discuss his new memoir, "The Friedkin Connection."
  • 11:00 am
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Science Friday The Musical Heritage of New Orleans The program visits New Orleans with Gwen Thompkins and discusses the city's musical heritage, this year's Jazz Fest, and the long recovery from Hurricane Katrina.
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air 'Shocked: My Mother, Schiaparelli, and Me' Author Patricia Volk talks to host Terry Gross about her coming-of-age memoir, "Shocked: My Mother, Schiaparelli, and Me," which juxtaposes the life of her mother with the fashion designer Elsa Schiaparelli. Both women had a profound effect on Volk's development as a young girl. The program also airs an excerpt of a recent lecture by Martin Scorsese on film and film history.
  • 2:00 pm
    World A Story from Both Sides of the Border Santiago Dominguez has been singing a love ballad to his daughter, Rosa, over the phone for the past 18 years. She left Mexico illegally when she was a young woman and he hasn't seen her since. But they're both hopeful that immigration reform will make a reunion possible. The program shares their story - from both sides of the border.
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace Campaigning for Presidential Libraries The George W. Bush Presidential Center just opened, and Hawaii is already campaigning to host Obamas presidential library -- even though many expect Chicago will be its home. The program discusses that story, and the days business news.
  • 4:30 pm
    All Things Considered
    KQED News 4:30pm, 5:04pm, 5:30pm, 6:04pm & 7:04pm


    Climate Education Tour -- Most American students are taught very little about climate change, even though it will have a big impact on their future. The program discusses how, to fill the gap, a non-profit group has been putting on multimedia presentations across the country, asserting that young people have a right to know what's in store for them.
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Marketplace Campaigning for Presidential Libraries The George W. Bush Presidential Center just opened, and Hawaii is already campaigning to host Obamas presidential library -- even though many expect Chicago will be its home. The program discusses that story, and the days business news.
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air 'Shocked: My Mother, Schiaparelli, and Me' Author Patricia Volk talks to host Terry Gross about her coming-of-age memoir, "Shocked: My Mother, Schiaparelli, and Me," which juxtaposes the life of her mother with the fashion designer Elsa Schiaparelli. Both women had a profound effect on Volk's development as a young girl. The program also airs an excerpt of a recent lecture by Martin Scorsese on film and film history.
  • 8:00 pm
    City Arts & Lectures Calvin Trillon and Garrison Keillor Garrison Keillor revitalized radio in 1974 with "A Prairie Home Companion." The weekly broadcasts showcase Keillor's gifts as a writer, storyteller, producer and performer, and are listened to by over 4 million Americans. Humorist and long-time New Yorker staff writer Calvin Trillin is a beloved chronicler of culture. Though his writing about food began as comic relief from his more serious pieces, it has earned him a dedicated readership and has been collected in three books including "American Fried," "Alice Let's Eat" and "Third Helpings." Trillin's other works include "Messages From My Father," "Remembering Denny" and "About Alice." His most recent book is "Dogfight: The 2012 Presidential Campaign in Verse." Both Keillor and Trillin celebrated 32 years of City Arts & Lectures broadcasts from the Herbst Theater, on April 30, 2013.
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
    Forum Filmmaker William Friedkin Academy Award-winning filmmaker William Friedkin reached the Hollywood stratosphere in the 1970s with such groundbreaking films as "The French Connection" and "The Exorcist." But the success was not to last. As he writes in his new memoir, "I was at the edge of a cliff and my demons were standing by waiting to push me off." Today, Friedkin is still directing films -- including 2011's well-received "Killer Joe" -- and has even developed a second career as an opera director. He joins us in studio to discuss his new memoir, "The Friedkin Connection."
  • 11:00 pm
    All Things Considered Dwindling Bee Population On Tuesday, Government researchers released results from their annual survey of honeybee colonies -- and the numbers are discouraging. One-third of all colonies failed to survive the winter and the numbers were even worse among large beekeepers who travel the country with their bees, providing pollination services to crops like almonds and blueberries. The program discusses how researchers are still looking for solutions to the problem
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Fake Missiles in North Korea? North Korea appears to soon be ready to test its most advanced missile yet. Pentagon officials are worried about an even more powerful missile that appeared in a parade last year, called the KN-08. But the missile on display was a fake. The open intelligence community is divided as to whether the KN-08 really exists -- or if it's just an elaborate decoy.
Tuesday, May 7, 2013

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