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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Wednesday, April 24, 2013

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Wednesday, April 24, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered AP's Twitter Hacked, Dow Drops A single tweet from the Associated Press sent Wall Street tumbling on Tuesday. The news organization's Twitter account was hacked and sent a notice that explosions at the White House had injured President Obama. As a result, the Dow Jones fell more than 150 points before recovering after it was learned the tweet was erroneous.
  • 1:00 am
  • 2:00 am
    City Arts & Lectures Remembering Jonathan Winters The late Jonathan Winters was an icon of American comedy. In the 1960s, Winters recorded many classic comedy albums based on his standup. His influence grew with the dawn of television, where his signature mimicry and wild spontaneity were frequently showcased on "The Steve Allen Show," "The Jack Paar Program" and Johnny Carson's "Tonight Show." In the '70s, he appeared as Mork's infant son Mearth on "Mork and Mindy" with Robin Williams. Williams has called Winters his mentor and greatest influence. Winters acted in many movies and cartoons, including roles in "It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World," "The Russians Are Coming!" and "The Adventures of Rocky and Bullwinkle." In addition to his pioneering work as a performer, Winters wrote the bestselling short story collection "Winters Tales" and was a passionate painter. He passed away on April 11, 2013. The program rebroadcasts a conversation with Winters, which took place at the Herbst Theatre on May 30, 2007.
  • 3:00 am
    Morning Edition The Cook Your Cupboard Challenge The program is asking listeners what's in their cupboard -- and challenging famous chefs to use it all in a meal. Vinegar, almond milk and dried beans? Cookbook author Nigella Lawson suggests vegetarian chili with cornbread and chutney.
  • 5:00 am
    Morning Edition
    The California Report 5:50am, 6:50am & 8:50am

    KQED News 6am, 6:30am, 7am, 7:30am, 8am, 8:30am, 9am, 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm & 4:30pm


    Perspectives 6:06am, 7:35am & 11:30pm

  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
  • 9:00 am
    Forum The CIA and 'The Way of the Knife' Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times reporter Mark Mazzetti reveals how the CIA transformed from a spy outfit into a paramilitary organization focused on controversial targeted killings. In his new book "The Way of the Knife," Mazzetti talks about the increased use of drone strikes, and how the U.S. military is taking on more of the CIA's intelligence and information-gathering role.
  • 10:00 am
    Forum Warm Weather Getaways This week's surprisingly hot weather has a lot of people in the Bay Area daydreaming at their desks about redwood hikes, remote campsites and lakeside lounging. We gather a panel of experts on the best camping and weekend getaways in or near the Bay Area. Where is your favorite weekend getaway destination?
  • 11:00 am
    Science Friday The Political Junkie The president mourns victims in West, Texas. In Washington, both sides look for lessons after the gun bill goes down in Congress. Montana Democrat Max Baucus announces his retirement -- and the Boston bombing reverberates through the immigration debate. Political junkie Ken Rudin joins host Neal Conan.
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Science Friday The Scars of Surviving Tragedy The country continues to mourn the loss of too many lives in recent days, in Boston and in the massive fire and explosion in Texas. Much of our focus is on the victims. But, there are also many survivors -- and surviving can leave its own kind of scars.
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air David Sedaris Terry Gross talks with humorist David Sedaris about his new book of essays, "Let's Explore Diabetes with Owls." Some of the stories are based on his journal writing which he began in 1977. His other books include "When You Are Engulfed in Flames" and the bestsellers "Me Talk Pretty One Day," "Naked" and "Barrel Fever." Sedaris first became known for the "Santaland Diaries," broadcast on NPR in the early 1990s. He is a frequent contributor to This American Life, Esquire and The New Yorker.
  • 2:00 pm
    World Immigrant Students and Assimilation The attention being paid to the two Tsarnaev brothers raises important questions about assimilation. Researchers have found that immigrants who arrive in the U.S. as children or teens often have a tough adjustment. If they came from a region beset by war, their challenges are even greater. The show takes a fresh look at immigrant students, and how they become Americans.
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace In Britain, an Immigrant Group's Success Story
  • 4:30 pm
    All Things Considered
    KQED News 4:30pm, 5:04pm, 5:30pm, 6:04pm & 7:04pm


    Twitter's Vulnerability -- When hackers posted a false tweet on the AP's Twitter account Tuesday, it caused the Dow Jones Industrial Average to tumble 145 points in two minutes .The market recovered, but the incident highlighted Twitter's vulnerability. The program discusses how the stakes are high as companies and government agencies increasingly use Twitter to disclose important information. What is Twitter doing to thwart hackers and what should Twitter users do to protect their accounts?
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Marketplace In Britain, an Immigrant Group's Success Story
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air David Sedaris Terry Gross talks with humorist David Sedaris about his new book of essays, "Let's Explore Diabetes with Owls." Some of the stories are based on his journal writing which he began in 1977. His other books include "When You Are Engulfed in Flames" and the bestsellers "Me Talk Pretty One Day," "Naked" and "Barrel Fever." Sedaris first became known for the "Santaland Diaries," broadcast on NPR in the early 1990s. He is a frequent contributor to This American Life, Esquire and The New Yorker.
  • 8:00 pm
    Radio Specials Computer History Museum Presents SRI: Innovating the Future The non-profit Stanford Research Institute (SRI) International's pioneering contributions to computing are legendary, from the invention of the computer mouse and interactive computing in the 1960s, to the first internetworked and wireless connections in the 1970s. In 2010, SRI created the first-generation virtual personal assistant, and sold Siri to Apple. John Markoff of The New York Times will explore SRI, beginning with a conversation with William Mark, vice president of information and computing sciences. Mark and his researchers are working on next-generation textbooks that use artificial intelligence, and human-machine interfaces that anticipate your moves. SRI's President and CEO Curt Carlson will also join the conversation to offer a unique definition of innovation and discuss its importance in government policy, education, and U.S. competitiveness. How does SRI do it, while many powerhouse corporate research labs have disappeared?
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
    Forum Warm Weather Getaways This week's surprisingly hot weather has a lot of people in the Bay Area daydreaming at their desks about redwood hikes, remote campsites and lakeside lounging. We gather a panel of experts on the best camping and weekend getaways in or near the Bay Area. Where is your favorite weekend getaway destination?
  • 11:00 pm
    All Things Considered Syrian Chemical Weapon Allegations The Syrian regime is facing more allegations that it has used chemical weapons in its ongoing civil war. A top Israeli intelligence official on Tuesday cited photographs of victims as evidence of Sarin gas. But the Obama administration says it's looking for more "conclusive evidence" before deciding to take action. The program discusses what's involved in verifying the use of chemical weapons.
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered President Obama and Terrorism The program reviews the terrorist attacks that have punctuated President Obama's time in office, and how they have changed his presidency.
Wednesday, April 24, 2013

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