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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Tuesday, April 23, 2013

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Tuesday, April 23, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Single, Female, Homeowner After married couples, the largest demographic buying homes is single women. In fact, their share of the market is twice that of single men. What's driving the growing market?
  • 1:00 am
  • 2:00 am
    It's Your World (a broadcast of the World Affairs Council) Economic Lessons From the Third World What can the U.S. and other large economies of the world learn from the fiscal policies of former Third World nations? The program's guest is Peter Blair Henry, dean of the Leonard N. Stern School of Business at New York University. Looking at income disparities in the Caribbean, "catch-up" economics from China and the wrangling of inflation in Latin America, Henry will discuss lessons of fiscal discipline that could lead to long-term prosperity.
  • 3:00 am
    Morning Edition The Cost of a Bride in the New China Women are now a minority in China, so it can be hard for men to find brides. They have to buy apartments for their new wives, and give their in-laws extravagant gifts.
  • 5:00 am
    Morning Edition
    The California Report 5:50am, 6:50am & 8:50am

    KQED News 6am, 6:30am, 7am, 7:30am, 8am, 8:30am, 9am, 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm & 4:30pm


    Perspectives 6:06am, 7:35am & 11:30pm

  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
  • 9:00 am
    Forum Will the Koch Brothers Buy the LA Times? Conservative businessmen Charles and David Koch are considering a bid to buy the Tribune Company's eight regional newspapers, including The Los Angeles Times. Liberal website the Daily Kos and progressive advocacy group Courage Campaign have collected thousands of signatures protesting the move. We discuss Koch Industries' bid, and explore how it fits in with the companies' libertarian political agenda.
  • 9:30 am
    Forum Furloughs, Mergers and the State of Air Travel Flights were delayed across the country on Monday, the first day of furloughs for air-traffic controllers under federal across-the-board budget cuts. Meanwhile, a bankruptcy court recently gave American Airlines approval to merge with US Airways, potentially creating the world's biggest airline. We'll examine what air travelers can expect in the coming busy summer travel season.
  • 10:00 am
    Forum Isabel Allende: 'Maya's Notebook' In Isabel Allende's new novel "Maya's Notebook," the 19-year-old protagonist journals about her happy childhood in Berkeley -- and her later escapades involving drugs, sex and crime in Las Vegas, as she hides out from her pursuers on an island off the coast of Chile. Allende joins us to talk about the book, and about how she weaves her passion for her home country into her writing. Allende recently won the Carl Sandburg Literary Award, given to authors who have made significant contributions to the written word.
  • 11:00 am
    Science Friday Syria: Has Assad Crossed a Red Line? Activists report at least 100 dead after six days of fighting near Damascus. Riots erupted in refugee camps over the border in Jordan, and American allies in Britain and France claim Syria has already used chemical weapons. What's next in Syria? Has the Assad regime crossed the red line?
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Science Friday Volunteer Fire Departments When fire erupted at a fertilizer plant in West, Texas, volunteer firefighters rushed to the scene. When that plant exploded, eight of them lost their lives. The show discusses volunteer fire departments across the U.S., from how they work and train to the responsibilities they shoulder.
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air Actor Matthew McConaughey Terry Gross talks with actor Matthew McConaughey. He's starring in the new film "Mud," recently starred in "Magic Mike," "Killer Joe" and "Bernie" -- and he co-stars in Martin Scorsese's next film.
  • 2:00 pm
    World Muslim Teens Face Increased Scrutiny College students are talking about the Boston Marathon bombings. That includes Muslim American students who see increased scrutiny of their families and friends. The show hears from Muslim teens on how they're coping with a new wave of anti-Muslim sentiment.
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace Designing Apple's New HQ Apple's new headquarters represent a disruptive force in Silicon Valley -- at least when it comes to architecture.
  • 4:30 pm
    All Things Considered
    KQED News 4:30pm, 5:04pm, 5:30pm, 6:04pm & 7:04pm


    Boston Bomb-Making Questions -- Authorities want to determine whether the men who carried out the bombing at the Boston Marathon acted on their own or operated with support from others, possibly a terrorist group. They'll be looking at the bombs used in the attack -- the more sophisticated the bomb design, the more likely the suspects would have needed help. But as the program reports, the pressure-cooker bombs used in Boston are not hard to make.
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Marketplace Designing Apple's New HQ Apple's new headquarters represent a disruptive force in Silicon Valley -- at least when it comes to architecture.
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air Actor Matthew McConaughey Terry Gross talks with actor Matthew McConaughey. He's starring in the new film "Mud," recently starred in "Magic Mike," "Killer Joe" and "Bernie" -- and he co-stars in Martin Scorsese's next film.
  • 8:00 pm
    City Arts & Lectures Remembering Jonathan Winters The late Jonathan Winters was an icon of American comedy. In the 1960s, Winters recorded many classic comedy albums based on his standup. His influence grew with the dawn of television, where his signature mimicry and wild spontaneity were frequently showcased on "The Steve Allen Show," "The Jack Paar Program" and Johnny Carson's "Tonight Show." In the '70s, he appeared as Mork's infant son Mearth on "Mork and Mindy" with Robin Williams. Williams has called Winters his mentor and greatest influence. Winters acted in many movies and cartoons, including roles in "It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World," "The Russians Are Coming!" and "The Adventures of Rocky and Bullwinkle." In addition to his pioneering work as a performer, Winters wrote the bestselling short story collection "Winters Tales" and was a passionate painter. He passed away on April 11, 2013. The program rebroadcasts a conversation with Winters, which took place at the Herbst Theatre on May 30, 2007.
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
    Forum Isabel Allende: 'Maya's Notebook' In Isabel Allende's new novel "Maya's Notebook," the 19-year-old protagonist journals about her happy childhood in Berkeley -- and her later escapades involving drugs, sex and crime in Las Vegas, as she hides out from her pursuers on an island off the coast of Chile. Allende joins us to talk about the book, and about how she weaves her passion for her home country into her writing. Allende recently won the Carl Sandburg Literary Award, given to authors who have made significant contributions to the written word.
  • 11:00 pm
    All Things Considered Artificial Photosynthesis A senior climate scientist says today's students should turn toward energy research, not climate scientists. The program meets with several students who've done exactly that. They're with a major project in California working on re-creating the leaf. Plants store energy they get from sunlight, but they aren't very efficient at it. A major project in California seeks to re-engineer photosynthesis, in order to produce fuels that would replace petroleum. If engineers can perfect this technology, it could help reduce our dependence on fossil fuels, and it would slow the rate of global warming. But it would come at a price: the artificial plants would command vast amounts of real estate.
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered AP's Twitter Hacked, Dow Drops A single tweet from the Associated Press sent Wall Street tumbling on Tuesday. The news organization's Twitter account was hacked and sent a notice that explosions at the White House had injured President Obama. As a result, the Dow Jones fell more than 150 points before recovering after it was learned the tweet was erroneous.
Tuesday, April 23, 2013

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