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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Monday, April 22, 2013

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Monday, April 22, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    Tech Nation Japan's 'Supersubs' Moira Gunn speaks with John Geoghegan, whom you may know from his PBS documentary "Japanese Supersub," about Japan's surprise underwater aircraft carrier. He's the author of "Operation Storm: Japan's Top Secret Submarines and Its Plan to Change the Course of World War II."
  • 1:00 am
    Latino USA Latinos and Mental Health Growing up can be an emotional rollercoaster. Where do Latino youth caught up between culture and challenges to emotional well-being go for support? The show hears from three young Latinos and how they cope with anxiety, depression, peer pressure and relationships. The program also hears from Dr. Sergio Aguilar-Gaxiola, a professor and founding director of the UC Davis Center for Reducing Health Disparities.
  • 1:30 am
    Cambridge Forum Writing on the Walls A panel of authors discusses writing to, from and about prison. Former inmate Dwayne Betts, journalist Jennifer Gonnerman and educator Jean Trounstine talk about their experiences with H. Bruce Franklin, author of "Prison Writings in 20th Century America." How do writers in prison experience the discipline that writing imposes? How do they sense the power of verbal creativity in an environment designed to limit their personal agency?
  • 2:00 am
    Marketplace Money Revamping Your Portfolio While cleaning up our finances, it's a good idea to take a hard look at your savings and investments. For some advice on how to revamp your portfolio, guest host Barbara Bogaev talks with investment adviser and psychiatrist Dr. Richard Peterson.
  • 3:00 am
    Morning Edition The Latest From Boston The investigation into the Boston bombings continues, across the city, across the U.S. and now across the Atlantic. NPR reporters will present the latest information on the investigation, the suspects and how the city of Boston is recovering.
  • 5:00 am
    Morning Edition
    The California Report 5:50am, 6:50am & 8:50am

    KQED News 6am, 6:30am, 7am, 7:30am, 8am, 8:30am, 9am, 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm & 4:30pm


    Perspectives 6:06am, 7:35am & 11:30pm

  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
  • 9:00 am
    Forum Update on the Boston Bombing Investigation After placing the city of Boston on lockdown, police captured the second suspect in the Boston Marathon bombings late on Friday. Nineteen-year-old Dzhokhar Tsarnaeva was found hiding in a boat docked in a backyard after a citywide sweep by SWAT teams, military Humvees and police dogs. The other suspect, his older brother, died after a car chase and police shootout. We get the latest news from Boston, and discuss how the brothers' suspected involvement in the bombings and their Chechen roots will affect homeland security and beyond.
  • 10:00 am
    Forum Hedrick Smith: 'Who Stole the American Dream?' Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative journalist Hedrick Smith argues that over the past 40 years, aggressive deregulation, pro-business tax policy and the demise of corporate responsibility have undermined the American dream. Smith discusses what he sees as the growing concentration of wealth in the hands of a few, its implications for the middle class and what it would take to restore shared prosperity in the U.S.
  • 11:00 am
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air Animals, Humans and 'Zoobiquity' What does the animal world have to tell us about human health and sexuality? Terry Gross talks with Barbara Natterson-Horowitz, cardiology professor at UCLA and cardiovascular consultant for the Los Angeles Zoo. She is co-author of the new book "Zoobiquity: The Astonishing Connection Between Human and Animal Health." Called in to help treat a small monkey with heart trouble, Natterson-Horowitz saw a link between something veterinarians call "capture myopathy" in animals and something she's seen diagnosed in humans. She began to research what other conditions or diseases are found in common among humans and animals, and what can we learn about how they are treated.
  • 2:00 pm
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace The Dark Side of Personal Finance The folks entrusted to invest your money may not have your best interests in mind. The show peeks into the dark side of the personal finance industry.
  • 4:30 pm
    All Things Considered
    KQED News 4:30pm, 5:04pm, 5:30pm, 6:04pm & 7:04pm


    Charges Against Boston Bombing Suspect -- The program discusses the charges against Boston bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev. He has been charged with using a weapon of mass destruction that killed three people and injured more than 200 at the Boston Marathon. He could be eligible for the death penalty.
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Marketplace The Dark Side of Personal Finance The folks entrusted to invest your money may not have your best interests in mind. The show peeks into the dark side of the personal finance industry.
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air Animals, Humans and 'Zoobiquity' What does the animal world have to tell us about human health and sexuality? Terry Gross talks with Barbara Natterson-Horowitz, cardiology professor at UCLA and cardiovascular consultant for the Los Angeles Zoo. She is co-author of the new book "Zoobiquity: The Astonishing Connection Between Human and Animal Health." Called in to help treat a small monkey with heart trouble, Natterson-Horowitz saw a link between something veterinarians call "capture myopathy" in animals and something she's seen diagnosed in humans. She began to research what other conditions or diseases are found in common among humans and animals, and what can we learn about how they are treated.
  • 8:00 pm
    It's Your World (a broadcast of the World Affairs Council) Economic Lessons From the Third World What can the U.S. and other large economies of the world learn from the fiscal policies of former Third World nations? The program's guest is Peter Blair Henry, dean of the Leonard N. Stern School of Business at New York University. Looking at income disparities in the Caribbean, "catch-up" economics from China and the wrangling of inflation in Latin America, Henry will discuss lessons of fiscal discipline that could lead to long-term prosperity.
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
    Forum Hedrick Smith: 'Who Stole the American Dream?' Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative journalist Hedrick Smith argues that over the past 40 years, aggressive deregulation, pro-business tax policy and the demise of corporate responsibility have undermined the American dream. Smith discusses what he sees as the growing concentration of wealth in the hands of a few, its implications for the middle class and what it would take to restore shared prosperity in the U.S.
  • 11:00 pm
    All Things Considered 'In-Group' Favoritism and Prejudice A Yale University professor realized in the emergency room of a Yale hospital that she was treated very differently when the doctors realized she was their colleague. A new book, "Blindspot," by Mahzarin Banaji and Tony Greenwald, asks us to think about prejudice differently. They ask whether "in-group" favoritism -- where we do nice things for members of our racial, professional, religious and ethnic tribes -- can better explain the disparities we see in society rather than out-group discrimination.
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Single, Female, Homeowner After married couples, the largest demographic buying homes is single women. In fact, their share of the market is twice that of single men. What's driving the growing market?
Monday, April 22, 2013

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